If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NPR)   "Mmmmmm....This strawberry shortcake is delicious. You can really taste the beaver ass"   (npr.org) divider line 43
    More: Sick, glands, taste, technical term  
•       •       •

2795 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Mar 2014 at 4:05 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-27 02:17:35 PM
But the chance of encountering eau de beaver in foods today is actually slim to none, Reineccius says. It's simply too expensive. So companies have pretty much stopped using it.
 
2014-03-27 02:18:14 PM

www.rantlifestyle.com

 
2014-03-27 02:35:02 PM
The beaver's scent contains hundreds of compounds, including ones that smell like honey, anus and even raspberry.
 
2014-03-27 02:52:57 PM

Theaetetus: The beaver's scent contains hundreds of compounds, including ones that smell like honey, anus and even raspberry.


Hehe
 
2014-03-27 02:56:58 PM

Theaetetus: The beaver's scent contains hundreds of compounds, including ones that smell like honey, anus and even raspberry.


I guess it's a crap shoot which one you get.
 
2014-03-27 03:09:27 PM
Wait till they find out what Foie Gras, Squab, and Veal are made out of....
 
2014-03-27 03:31:02 PM
Ah, yes, castoreum. Anal beaver juice.

/Thank you GJB
 
2014-03-27 03:51:23 PM
man, now I want to go find a beaver to sniff
 
2014-03-27 04:12:19 PM
I want the Jerry Mathews opinion..............
 
2014-03-27 04:14:35 PM
FTA:  Turns out, the scent of beaver is not only pleasant but downright wonderful, wildlife ecologist Joanne Crawford National Geographic in October.

 I agree.
 
2014-03-27 04:20:51 PM
The chemistry of smell and taste is pretty bizarre actually.  One of my favorites, from organic synth lab

chemwiki.ucdavis.edu

One of these molecules smells like spearmint.  One of them smells like caraway seeds.  Can you see the difference? Can you guess which is which?

(The R- isomer is spearmint)
 
2014-03-27 04:24:51 PM

unlikely: But the chance of encountering eau de beaver in foods today is actually slim to none, Reineccius says. It's simply too expensive. So companies have pretty much stopped using it.


So, really, beaver butt juice flavoring is too good for the common rabble.
 
2014-03-27 04:25:39 PM
Better than the strawberry tart.

/without so much rat in it.
 
2014-03-27 04:26:48 PM

Glockenspiel Hero: The chemistry of smell and taste is pretty bizarre actually.  One of my favorites, from organic synth lab

[chemwiki.ucdavis.edu image 548x404]

One of these molecules smells like spearmint.  One of them smells like caraway seeds.  Can you see the difference? Can you guess which is which?

(The R- isomer is spearmint)


It's really neat how much chirality affects the actions of chemicals
 
2014-03-27 04:33:27 PM

Glockenspiel Hero: The chemistry of smell and taste is pretty bizarre actually.  One of my favorites, from organic synth lab

[chemwiki.ucdavis.edu image 548x404]

One of these molecules smells like spearmint.  One of them smells like caraway seeds.  Can you see the difference? Can you guess which is which?

(The R- isomer is spearmint)


Double Carbon chains?.
 
2014-03-27 04:34:14 PM

CygnusDarius: Glockenspiel Hero: The chemistry of smell and taste is pretty bizarre actually.  One of my favorites, from organic synth lab

[chemwiki.ucdavis.edu image 548x404]

One of these molecules smells like spearmint.  One of them smells like caraway seeds.  Can you see the difference? Can you guess which is which?

(The R- isomer is spearmint)

Double Carbon chains bonds?.


FTFM.
 
2014-03-27 04:56:41 PM

Theaetetus: The beaver's scent contains hundreds of compounds, including ones that smell like honey, anus and even raspberry.


reactiongifs.me
 
2014-03-27 05:02:36 PM
Tasty-ass food trifecta in play

/ xkcd.jpg
 
2014-03-27 05:14:24 PM
Maybe I'm just gutter-minded, but I laughed all the way through that article.
 
2014-03-27 05:29:03 PM
Get down there, and stick your nose near its bum,' " she said, adding, "People think I'm nuts. I tell them, 'Oh, but it's beavers; it smells really good.' "

i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-03-27 05:34:31 PM
""I lift up the animal's tail and I'm like, 'Get down there, and stick your nose near its bum,' " she said, adding, "People think I'm nuts. I tell them, 'Oh, but it's beavers; it smells really good. "

Actually NO!.. you are FREAKING LIEING!

as someone who grew up with the trappers who are the ones who harvest this from the animals and hung them in huge batches to dry all winter, usually in the entry way of their domicile, I can tell you quite clearly that IT SMELLS DISGUSTING
 
2014-03-27 05:34:49 PM
 
2014-03-27 05:39:51 PM
"I lift up the animal's tail and I'm like, 'Get down there, and stick your nose near its bum,' " she said, adding, "People think I'm nuts. I tell them, 'Oh, but it's beavers; it smells really good.' "

OK, I couldn't read past that part, it was too goddamn funny.
 
2014-03-27 06:41:34 PM

Mentat: Theaetetus: The beaver's scent contains hundreds of compounds, including ones that smell like honey, anus and even raspberry.

I guess it's a crap shoot which one you get.


It's Bertie Bott's on an epic scale.

Maybe they're made of beaver anuses.
 
2014-03-27 07:22:50 PM

kvinesknows: ""I lift up the animal's tail and I'm like, 'Get down there, and stick your nose near its bum,' " she said, adding, "People think I'm nuts. I tell them, 'Oh, but it's beavers; it smells really good. "

Actually NO!.. you are FREAKING LIEING!

as someone who grew up with the trappers who are the ones who harvest this from the animals and hung them in huge batches to dry all winter, usually in the entry way of their domicile, I can tell you quite clearly that IT SMELLS DISGUSTING


I think you are missing the point. If I were an ecologist I'd laugh myself silly at the thought of people trying to sniff a beaver's ass based on this article. I think this is a well played joke.
 
2014-03-27 07:27:54 PM
Shortcake: it really milks the beaver's ass.
 
2014-03-27 07:53:26 PM
FTA: "In the flavor industry, you need tons and tons of material to work with," Reineccius tells The Salt. "It's not like you can grow fields of beavers to harvest. There aren't very many of them. So it ends up being a very expensive product - and not very popular with food companies."

I now have in my mind an image of beaver butts sticking out of a farm field.  WOULD SOMEONE PLEASE POST AN IMAGE TO GET THAT ONE OUT OF MY MIND!!!
 
2014-03-27 08:16:11 PM
And in 2011, the Vegetarian Resource Group five companies that make vanilla flavoring if they used any beaver extract. All of them said no.

You mean they heard a rumor and didn't run to Facebook and 'OMG!1! Ice cream contains beaver toxin!11!' all over themselves?
Color me shocked!
 
2014-03-27 08:32:20 PM
img1.etsystatic.com

Not available for comment.
 
2014-03-27 09:02:40 PM
Dut dada DAH! biatch Pudding!

/Y'all just got a taste of the biatch Pudding.
 
2014-03-27 09:48:03 PM
I think beaver smells wonderful.
I eat them too.

4-legged kind too
 
2014-03-27 10:10:17 PM

CygnusDarius: CygnusDarius: Glockenspiel Hero: The chemistry of smell and taste is pretty bizarre actually.  One of my favorites, from organic synth lab

[chemwiki.ucdavis.edu image 548x404]

One of these molecules smells like spearmint.  One of them smells like caraway seeds.  Can you see the difference? Can you guess which is which?

(The R- isomer is spearmint)

Double Carbon chains bonds?.

FTFM.


Nope, they both have the same number of double bonds.
 
2014-03-27 11:08:37 PM

entropic_existence: CygnusDarius: CygnusDarius: Glockenspiel Hero: The chemistry of smell and taste is pretty bizarre actually.  One of my favorites, from organic synth lab

[chemwiki.ucdavis.edu image 548x404]

One of these molecules smells like spearmint.  One of them smells like caraway seeds.  Can you see the difference? Can you guess which is which?

(The R- isomer is spearmint)

Double Carbon chains bonds?.

FTFM.

Nope, they both have the same number of double bonds.


Damn it :(.
 
2014-03-27 11:33:50 PM

CygnusDarius: Glockenspiel Hero: The chemistry of smell and taste is pretty bizarre actually.  One of my favorites, from organic synth lab

[chemwiki.ucdavis.edu image 548x404]

One of these molecules smells like spearmint.  One of them smells like caraway seeds.  Can you see the difference? Can you guess which is which?

(The R- isomer is spearmint)

Double Carbon chains?.


They're stereoisomers.  The bond connectivity is the same, they have a different chirality at the one atom where chirality is relevant (the low-center atom on the ring).  The solid triangle represents a bond coming out of the page toward the viewer, the dotted triangle represents the opposite (also not the triangles point different directions, that's the functional part of the notation, the dot/solid bit is mostly for contrast).

// You're welcome for the review of high-school science.
 
2014-03-27 11:48:36 PM

real_headhoncho: FTA: "In the flavor industry, you need tons and tons of material to work with," Reineccius tells The Salt. "It's not like you can grow fields of beavers to harvest. There aren't very many of them. So it ends up being a very expensive product - and not very popular with food companies."

I now have in my mind an image of beaver butts sticking out of a farm field.  WOULD SOMEONE PLEASE POST AN IMAGE TO GET THAT ONE OUT OF MY MIND!!!


Tom Pendergast and his family have farmed beaver ass on this land for five generations.  But his livelihood and those of beaver ass farmers like him are in danger due to cheap foreign beaver ass flowing in from China.
 
2014-03-28 12:07:57 AM

Tax Boy: Get down there, and stick your nose near its bum,' " she said, adding, "People think I'm nuts. I tell them, 'Oh, but it's beavers; it smells really good.' "


"Thank you. I just had it stuffed."

www.elvisblog.net
 
2014-03-28 12:15:08 AM
So, let me get this straight - he's right, more or less, on all accounts, even according to the article?

As to the usage, the article agrees that about 300 pounds of castoreum was used in a given year - but, that amount was extracted from thousands of beavers (which are, actually, farmed) and given that only tiny amounts are used for various products, using just that figure without providing other information (like, how much castoreum is used in a given volume of various products) is misleading.
As to the location, he wasn't quite as clear as he perhaps should've been, but given the show's format and the fact he had to shout it over an audience, I can't fault him for the imprecision. It's not commonly used because it's now simply too expensive - in other words, you're seeing it used in high-end products that require certain scent or flavor notes.

The whole article looks like a "please don't stop consuming products that might contain castoreum" pitch. I'd start asking who's still using it - 292 pounds a year on average.
 
2014-03-28 12:21:07 AM
It's not like you can grow fields of beavers to harvest.

Challenge accepted.
 
2014-03-28 06:58:35 AM

HotWingAgenda: It's not like you can grow fields of beavers to harvest.

Challenge accepted.


Ihavetheweirdestboner.jpg
 
2014-03-28 07:12:57 AM
I only use the juice from free range, grass-fed beavers...extracted, of course, with my Williams-Sonoma Castor Presse-Agrumes


/come on Google Translate....don't fail me now
 
2014-03-28 08:26:01 AM

TwistedIvory: Ah, yes, castoreum. Anal beaver juice.

/Thank you GJB


Exact same thought I had
 
2014-03-28 10:19:39 AM

FormlessOne: So, let me get this straight - he's right, more or less, on all accounts, even according to the article?

As to the usage, the article agrees that about 300 pounds of castoreum was used in a given year - but, that amount was extracted from thousands of beavers (which are, actually, farmed) and given that only tiny amounts are used for various products, using just that figure without providing other information (like, how much castoreum is used in a given volume of various products) is misleading.
As to the location, he wasn't quite as clear as he perhaps should've been, but given the show's format and the fact he had to shout it over an audience, I can't fault him for the imprecision. It's not commonly used because it's now simply too expensive - in other words, you're seeing it used in high-end products that require certain scent or flavor notes.

The whole article looks like a "please don't stop consuming products that might contain castoreum" pitch. I'd start asking who's still using it - 292 pounds a year on average.


Flavor chemist here, I will clarify albiet late.

Most castoreum used today is in the fragrance industry.  Flavors and fragrance are extremely close in the sense of what materials are used.  This is because the same organ is responsible for both smell and flavor (flavor is everything that is not sour, sweet, bitter, salty, umami/savory as these are more considered "taste").  As for the beaver castoreum, the cost is extremely high and most foods cannot absorb this cost making it next to never used.  Fragrances however have an enourmous markup and CAN and DO use this type of material, usually in small quantities.  To be fair and honest to the article, castoreum might be in some food somewhere, but in my career I have never seen the Neat/pure material, and don't expext to.  I choke when I see the prices of rose oils or rum fractions, castoreum makes them look like hobo swill.

 In the scale of under 300 lbs produced this is actually pretty small.  I am willing to bet that there is a beaver farm in some part of China producing this stuff as well as selling the pelts.  I was lucky enough to talk to an engineer who produces high end shaving products and he told me of a Badger farm in china for those nifty brushes used in lathering shave soaps.  A badger farm will always seem like the worst kind of farm in my imagination.  So apparently if we need large quantities of an animal product, chinese farmers are willing to do it.
 
2014-03-28 09:45:40 PM

kicksmile: FormlessOne: So, let me get this straight - he's right, more or less, on all accounts, even according to the article?

As to the usage, the article agrees that about 300 pounds of castoreum was used in a given year - but, that amount was extracted from thousands of beavers (which are, actually, farmed) and given that only tiny amounts are used for various products, using just that figure without providing other information (like, how much castoreum is used in a given volume of various products) is misleading.
As to the location, he wasn't quite as clear as he perhaps should've been, but given the show's format and the fact he had to shout it over an audience, I can't fault him for the imprecision. It's not commonly used because it's now simply too expensive - in other words, you're seeing it used in high-end products that require certain scent or flavor notes.

The whole article looks like a "please don't stop consuming products that might contain castoreum" pitch. I'd start asking who's still using it - 292 pounds a year on average.

Flavor chemist here, I will clarify albiet late.

Most castoreum used today is in the fragrance industry.  Flavors and fragrance are extremely close in the sense of what materials are used.  This is because the same organ is responsible for both smell and flavor (flavor is everything that is not sour, sweet, bitter, salty, umami/savory as these are more considered "taste").  As for the beaver castoreum, the cost is extremely high and most foods cannot absorb this cost making it next to never used.  Fragrances however have an enourmous markup and CAN and DO use this type of material, usually in small quantities.  To be fair and honest to the article, castoreum might be in some food somewhere, but in my career I have never seen the Neat/pure material, and don't expext to.  I choke when I see the prices of rose oils or rum fractions, castoreum makes them look like hobo swill.

 In the scale of under 300 lbs produced this is actually prett ...


What I just read was a market need for a new breed of 'juicing' beavers.

/don't worry about the badgers...they don't get a shiat.
 
Displayed 43 of 43 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report