If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Sun News Network)   Good news: You can get a 3D-printed skull when a bullet fired from a 3D-printed gun pierces your original boring one   (sunnewsnetwork.ca) divider line 56
    More: Cool, 3D printing  
•       •       •

4132 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Mar 2014 at 12:09 PM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



56 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-03-27 02:42:37 PM  
If my skull has to be replaced I'm asking for upgrades. Gimmie a pair of horns or something... perhaps emphasize the brow ridges and chin...

i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-27 04:09:46 PM  
I had a character use a 3D printed gun in my second novel...wonder if I'm the first author to do so?

/seems unlikely
 
2014-03-27 04:59:38 PM  
It will be sweet when we can print clothes at home, custom size, style and color. Then I would get a machine for my garage.
 
2014-03-27 07:10:14 PM  

LazyMedia: tennyson: LazyMedia: Wow, they used the miracle of 3D printing to make a plastic thing that could have been cast a hundred years ago or vacuformed in the '50s. What other wonders will 3D printing perform today?

I'm all with you on the skepticism about 3D printing, which hasn't come anywhere near the hype and doesn't appear to be getting there fast.

But bone replacements are one pretty good use of it. It's a case where the only structural property you need is "hard", and the shape matters more than anything. It doesn't need to be flexible, or conductive, or heat-resistant, or squishy, or reflective, or a combination of various properties in various parts. Maybe some day 3D printers will give us those things, but it doesn't appear to be any time soon.

Meantime, I do appreciate the few things it's good at, most especially its ability to do one-offs inexpensively. Something you can't get with anything that requires a mold. (But it can be good for making molds!)

Oh, I'm totally down with 3D printing (or additive manufacturing, which is a more descriptive name). It's quite cool, and certainly has it's place among a lot of other ways to make stuff. But the 3D printer fanboys swooning over how they're going to bittorrent a free Tesla make me tired, so I exaggerate for effect.


If Farkers were actually saying anything remotely like that without it being sarcasm you'd have a point. The overwhelming majority of people, at least on this site, realize that the technology has a ways to go before it's practical for any kind of real major home use. The medical field has been coming up with great stuff for the technology though, and the tech has been some progress in the prototyping field as well.
 
2014-03-27 07:40:46 PM  

Dingleberry Dickwad: If Farkers were actually saying anything remotely like that without it being sarcasm you'd have a point. The overwhelming majority of people, at least on this site, realize that the technology has a ways to go before it's practical for any kind of real major home use. The medical field has been coming up with great stuff for the technology though, and the tech has been some progress in the prototyping field as well.


The excitement and speculation on possible future uses can get a little on the extreme side at times, but I tend to just let it slide personally. There's a lot of wishful thinking that I doubt will ever come to pass, but I'd rather see people overly excited than overly pessimistic. Will I ever be able to 3D print a Tesla in my garage? Probably not. But the guys trying to make that happen will undoubtedly come up with something else really cool. So while I agree the extreme enthusiasm is can on occasion get a little tiresome, I hate to quash it as it's the enthusastic people who make my life better.

/One of the coolest 3D printing projects I've seen involves a little girl with some sort of skeletal/muscular problem and can barely move her arms. Her doctor is 3D printing a custom lightweight plastic and rubber band exoskeleton that allows her to do things like play and feed herself. He said it wouldn't be nearly as effective without the 3D printer due to how often it has to change to keep up with redesigns and her growth.
 
2014-03-28 12:32:32 PM  
Woohoo! A life extended by 3D printing!
 
Displayed 6 of 56 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report