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(Anchorage Daily News)   Anchorage Daily News asks, "Are we ready for the Great Alaska Earthquake of 2014?". Well, ARE you?   (adn.com) divider line 68
    More: Scary, Anchorage Daily News, Alaska Earthquake, Alaskans, Anchorage, emergency operations center, United Way, oil depot, aid agency  
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3781 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Mar 2014 at 1:25 PM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-27 03:59:05 PM
media.adn.commedia.adn.commedia.adn.commedia.adn.com


Uncle Bester: yakmans_dad: dittybopper: StrikitRich: My Dad was there during the 1964 Good Friday earthquake.  Story was he had was suffering from a really bad case of the flu and when woken by 'quake he thought it was just the illness and went back to sleep.  Somewhere there are slides of the damage and the trench caused by the fault movement.

True story.

I don't believe it.  No way are there slides of the damage and the trench.  That's just impossible.

Wasn't the quake epicenter well out to sea?

Not sure, but it split 4th avenue down the center of Anchorage in two.
It also caused a massive tsunami that pretty much destroyed the town of Girdwood (which was rebuilt much further inland).
It didn't cause huge casualties because Anchorage in 1964 wasn't exactly San Francisco.


There is a link in the article to some pictures.

http://www.adn.com/2014/03/25/3384900/50th-anniversary-of-1964-earth qu ake.html
 
2014-03-27 04:04:44 PM

NotARocketScientist: yakmans_dad: dittybopper: StrikitRich: My Dad was there during the 1964 Good Friday earthquake.  Story was he had was suffering from a really bad case of the flu and when woken by 'quake he thought it was just the illness and went back to sleep.  Somewhere there are slides of the damage and the trench caused by the fault movement.

True story.

I don't believe it.  No way are there slides of the damage and the trench.  That's just impossible.

Wasn't the quake epicenter well out to sea?

Yes it was. The resulting Tsunami washed away small coastal towns. It also broke the fuel tanks that were close to the shore (for ease of loading and unloading from ships) which then caught fire. So now you have the earth moving up and down and sideways, and walls of flaming water coming at you, trying to suck you out to sea when it passes. You can't even get to high ground because the ground is moving to much and you don't know that high ground will stay that way.  A special kind of hell.


No, it wasn't. It was 12 miles north of the coast of Prince William Sound.

i262.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-27 04:05:20 PM

Jument: Zasteva: Yes, we're ready!

Here in Charlottesville, Virginia we recently survived an earthquake much closer to us.

[img.fark.net image 441x314]

I think we can withstand one in Alaska.

Ok fine, I will be the guy that points out that it would actually take a fairly destructive earthquake to knock over a patio chair. I'm not earthquakologist but I would hazard a guess that the average building would suffer quite significant damage before a patio chair would fall over.


It was a 5.8. A few houses really close to the epicenter in Mineral, VA had some damage to brickwork. The quake triggered automatic shut down of the Lake Anna nuclear reactor 10 miles from the epicenter, and it stayed shut down for 3 or 4 months while they inspected it. All damage there was cosmetic.

/so why don't we make buildings out of patio chairs?

Because people would lean back in them too often?
 
2014-03-27 04:07:22 PM

Zasteva: Yes, we're ready!

Here in Charlottesville, Virginia we recently survived an earthquake much closer to us.

[img.fark.net image 441x314]

I think we can withstand one in Alaska.


That thing actually did some damage in Fairfax Co. and i didn't even feel it.

(working around trucks)
 
2014-03-27 04:17:53 PM

dittybopper: StrikitRich: My Dad was there during the 1964 Good Friday earthquake.  Story was he had was suffering from a really bad case of the flu and when woken by 'quake he thought it was just the illness and went back to sleep.  Somewhere there are slides of the damage and the trench caused by the fault movement.

True story.

I don't believe it.  No way are there slides of the damage and the trench.  That's just impossible.


In this footage (same link I posted above), you can see the trench opening up into Prince William Sound. The men onboard the Cheena were filming the ship's unloading when the quake struck.

You can watch all the water draining from PWS into the trench before the wave comes back and destroys Valdez.
 
2014-03-27 04:19:38 PM
was in Alexandria home depot when it hit
people were screaming

..I'm from san francisco so it was just a bit of fun for me but my galpal froze
I had to talk to her to get her out
 
2014-03-27 04:36:18 PM

Ivo Shandor: yakmans_dad: Is a 9.2 quake even possible? (I ask because I don't know not to be a smart ass.)

Considering that it has actually happened, I would have to say that it is indeed possible. It does, however, depend on which scale you are using when you say "9.2". The older Richter scale was only valid up to about 7.0, but the moment magnitude scale is open-ended and can be used to describe an arbitrarily large event.


I just figured that rock has a finite amount of strength. 9.2 is a huge amount of stress.
 
2014-03-27 05:19:13 PM
Hogwash.

Earthquakes run in cycles of 83 years and no one knows why, but they cannot be predicted with any accuracy.
 
2014-03-27 05:32:12 PM
IIRC the MM7.9 2002 Denali earthquake caused an elderly woman to be injured trying to go down stairs, and they had to readjust the supports for the Alaska oil pipeline afterwards (no leaks). The great 1906 San Francisco quake was a M7.8.

I'd guess they're probably as ready for it as anywhere. But I'd put the chance the Anchorage area subduction zone has built up M9+ worth of moment energy at zilch. Maybe a 2064 quake, but I doubt it (the west half of the Denali fault from where the last started to the Pacific would be my guess, even less populated and built than the east part that broke in 2002)
 
2014-03-27 05:50:13 PM

SwiftFox: IIRC the MM7.9 2002 Denali earthquake caused an elderly woman to be injured trying to go down stairs, and they had to readjust the supports for the Alaska oil pipeline afterwards (no leaks). The great 1906 San Francisco quake was a M7.8.


Pipeline supports functioned as designed and intended. The pipeline isn't connected to them, it just lays on them, and there are little "brake pads" that allow the earth to move below the pipe. Maintenance is expected after a large quake.

CSB about that quake:

I was taking a nap on the couch when I was awakened by a *THUNK* that shook everything. I knew it was a quake, and I started to blow it off and go back to sleep when the entire townhouse started rocking and swaying. "Holy shiat, BIG one," I thought, so I made a beeline for outside. As I was standing on the lawn, watching the spruce trees in a nearby forest doing a Janet Jackson-sort of choreographed dancing, other neighbors started trickling out.

Finally, an old man across the street emerged followed by his wife. He went out onto the lawn, and she stopped at the entranceway and stared at him.

"Woman, get out here!" he said.

"No! They say you're supposed to stand in a doorway!"

"Woman! Get out here!"

"But they *tell* you to stand in the doorway!"

The argument continued until the shaking stopped a few minutes later.

/CSB
 
2014-03-27 06:18:52 PM
I grew up on the Oregon Coast so earthquakes in Alaska were always something we thought about.

Now I live in Arizona, and I think about my friends and family still back in Oregon so if there's a Tsunami Warning, I immediately get worried.
 
2014-03-27 07:13:13 PM

yakmans_dad: Is a 9.2 quake even possible? (I ask because I don't know not to be a smart ass.)


It's how much energy can be stored up in the rocks around the fault before it lets go.

A long slip fault like the San Andreas fault can store enough energy to produce a magnitude 8.  In this case two plates are grinding past each other. The energy they can store depends on the length of the fault, the strength of the rocks, and geography of the points where the fault tends to stick.

Subduction faults (where one plate is sliding under another) like those off of Washington, Alaska, Japan, and Chile, can produce the biggest earthquakes, magnitude 9.  They can also produce huge tidal waves as hundreds of square miles of sea floor bounces around.

That said I really worry.  Not so much for where I live, next time the Hayward fault in the bay area goes it's going to be bad. But California has been working constantly to limit the amount of damage through biulding codes for over a century. Consider the Kobe quake and the Northridge quake were very similar, damage and loss of life was two orders of magnitude worse in Kobe. But when the Cascade fault rips, Seattle is going to be totally farked.  Brick Buildings, lots of fill and glacial silt, poor building code, and the quake is going to be a lot bigger than will hit California.
 
2014-03-27 10:46:27 PM
Lenny_da_Hog:

CSB about that quake:

CSB: Lenny_da_Hog was my roommate at that time, but I was in Tuscon that weekend. Bastard stole my earthquake.
 
2014-03-27 10:55:14 PM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2014/03/27/remember i ng-the-1964-great-alaska-earthquake-the-largest-in-u-s-history/

Pretty sure that's my grandpa walking past at 0:25, wearing the hat (he was known as Cap, since he was always wearing the hat)
 
2014-03-27 11:27:40 PM
Well . . . you never have enough beer.
 
2014-03-27 11:49:26 PM

yakmans_dad: Is a 9.2 quake even possible? (I ask because I don't know not to be a smart ass.)


Largest on record is a 9.5 in Valdivia, Chile in 1960. I lived there in the 90s. The older folks who were around have absolutely frightening stories about it.
 
2014-03-28 03:57:36 PM
When the Great Alaskan Earthquake does strike...I hope Sarah Palin is the first person
swallowed underground.
 
2014-03-28 07:46:34 PM

Li'l Robbie: When the Great Alaskan Earthquake does strike...I hope Sarah Palin is the first person
swallowed underground.


i can see Hades from my bunk!
 
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