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(Global Post)   Seven historical regions that can be annexed from Russia   (globalpost.com) divider line 66
    More: Interesting, Russia, Kaliningrad, Continental Europe, collapse of the Soviet Union, Kuril Islands, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Soviet Union  
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8257 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Mar 2014 at 1:20 PM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-27 04:51:36 PM  

FLMountainMan: GuyFawkes: This text is now purple: GuyFawkes: FlashHarry: i had no idea that kaliningrad existed. fascinating.


Formerly Konigsberg, however the Russians are never giving that back to Prussia/Germany.

That's what the Germans said about Danzig.


Gdansk?  Exactly.  Just finishing up a really interesting book about the immediate aftermath of WWII and its impact on the German people - just a sad story all around but fascinating stuff.

/WWII and general history buff
//good for subway reading too

What's really crazy is all the German villages in places like northern Khazakstan - descendants of POWs who were shipped out to labor camps instead of being released.  And Greeks in Tajikstan.


I'm not sure that is so crazy.  The largest community of Sri Lanka Tamils is in Toronto, Canada.  An Arabian sultanate was once in the Philipines and they are a minority on that country, called Moros.  And don't forget about the quarter million Chinese in Sao Paulo.  Should any of those countries claim their citizens or the land their citizens are on?  Not so sure.
 
2014-03-27 05:01:59 PM  

elgrancerdo: I'm not sure that is so crazy.  The largest community of Sri Lanka Tamils is in Toronto, Canada.  An Arabian sultanate was once in the Philipines and they are a minority on that country, called Moros.  And don't forget about the quarter million Chinese in Sao Paulo.  Should any of those countries claim their citizens or the land their citizens are on?  Not so sure.


LOL.  Do you actually think that's a relevant analogy to any post in this thread, let alone mine?
 
2014-03-27 05:04:13 PM  
And really, the Moros are not, in any way, shape or form, Arabian.  Never were.  Muslim missionaries spread Islam there.  There were, at one time, sultanate all over Eurasia.  Sultanate =/ Arab.
 
rpl
2014-03-27 05:15:18 PM  
my two cents:

1. The Kuril Islands: Claimed by Japan

Assuming that the last legitimate government in Russia was terminated in 1917 (which I personally do); Yes, definitely. They were ceded to Japan, at no point did Japan accept their loss, I'd say done deal.

2. Bolshoi Ussuriysky Island: Formerly China

Yeah, probably.

3. Sixty-Four Villages East of the River: Formerly China

Formally ceded by the legitimate ruler of the Chinese empire. Objectively speaking, the Chinese claim's strength here about equals to that of Turkey's to Crimea (ceded to the Russians in late 18th cent). Of course, modern day China and modern day Turkey are in slightly different weight categories so I think I actually like this one as the next hotspot; it has lots of potential.

Although I do find it odd that the article specifically mentions Taiwan not regonizing the territories as Russian. If anything, the PRC shouldn't be recognizing it. Oh well.

4. Latvia, 5. Estonia, 6. Finland

Former territories of the Russian Empire, two have recent agreements signed and the other was pretty much given up on by the other side. It's pretty much the same situation as with Ukraine/Crimea, so meh. "Should %5 appear too small, be thankful I don't take it all".

7. Kaliningrad: Formerly East Prussia (Germany)

Absolutely.


FLMountainMan: What's really crazy is all the German villages in places like northern Khazakstan - descendants of POWs who were shipped out to labor camps instead of being released.  And Greeks in Tajikstan.


Actually, those are probably descendants of the Russian Germans (long story) who were moved there along with other ethnic groups during Stalin's post-war playtime period. POWs left behind post war were (quite intentionally I believe) spread all across the GULAG network and therefore released in different places as well.
 
2014-03-27 05:22:23 PM  

GuyFawkes: FLMountainMan: GuyFawkes: This text is now purple: GuyFawkes: FlashHarry: i had no idea that kaliningrad existed. fascinating.


Formerly Konigsberg, however the Russians are never giving that back to Prussia/Germany.

That's what the Germans said about Danzig.


Gdansk?  Exactly.  Just finishing up a really interesting book about the immediate aftermath of WWII and its impact on the German people - just a sad story all around but fascinating stuff.

/WWII and general history buff
//good for subway reading too

What's really crazy is all the German villages in places like northern Khazakstan - descendants of POWs who were shipped out to labor camps instead of being released.  And Greeks in Tajikstan.

That's for sure.  Or Estonian/Latvian/Lithuanian, etc. enclaves in Siberia who were "resettled" in the years immediately before (during) and after WWII.  In case anyone wanted to know, I checked my kindle and the book I referenced earlier is "After the Reich: The Brutal History of the Allied Occupation" by Giles MacDonogh.


Mazower talks about that in his book on the history of the 3rd Reich (http://www.amazon.com/Hitlers-Empire-Nazis-Ruled-Europe/dp/014311610 X/ ref=pd_sim_b_10?ie=UTF8&refRID=14S78DE8SSGGVCBAM7Q3). He ultimately makes the argument Europe's primary objective to what the Nazis were up to was that it was being done by Germans instead of by them.
 
2014-03-27 05:33:50 PM  

rpl: Assuming that the last legitimate government in Russia was terminated in 1917 (which I personally do); Yes, definitely. They were ceded to Japan, at no point did Japan accept their loss, I'd say done deal.


What makes tsarist government more legitimate than Soviet government?
 
2014-03-27 05:37:46 PM  
/I remember reading Russian history according to some Russian nationalist movement online. It went something like this:

stuff happens
1917: bad guys overthrow legitimate government
stuff happens
1991: bad guys overthrow legitimate government
stuff happens
 
2014-03-27 06:02:38 PM  

HairyNevus: The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Аляска, formerly Alaska.

Yeah, I wonder what the world would be like if Russia never sold that to the U.S. What would a Russian Sarah Palin be like?


Sarah ! Put down the binoculars and get back to your nyetting!
 
rpl
2014-03-27 06:52:50 PM  

LewDux: rpl: Assuming that the last legitimate government in Russia was terminated in 1917 (which I personally do); Yes, definitely. They were ceded to Japan, at no point did Japan accept their loss, I'd say done deal.

What makes tsarist government more legitimate than Soviet government?


The Russian Empire was led by aristocrats and followed the same rules and principles as the rest of the world; the USSR was led by (often illiterate) thugs, who to the best of my knowledge followed no rules and held no principles whatsoever.

Otherwise my answer would have been "hahaha not bloody likely" for all territories taken in WWII (and maybe that Chinese island too; I have no clue what the Soviets were up to in China back then)
 
2014-03-27 07:35:29 PM  

rpl: The Russian Empire was led by aristocrats and followed the same rules and principles as the rest of the world;


They sure did
upload.wikimedia.org
 

the USSR was led by (often illiterate) thugs, who to the best of my knowledge followed no rules and held no principles whatsoever.

Same shiat, just in different hand
 
2014-03-27 08:01:52 PM  

jchuffyman: macadamnut: [i512.photobucket.com image 815x615]

[i512.photobucket.com image 520x708]

1.A military base lease, no matter how disputed, is not the same as claiming it's part of your country

2. Panama has controlled that zone the entire 21st Century


and

FLMountainMan: macadamnut: [i512.photobucket.com image 815x615]

[i512.photobucket.com image 520x708]

Oh god, I hope you're not serious. If you are, you're incredibly farking ignorant.



What the fark? Do people really think the US has any right to these places? Or if we ever did, that we haven't forfeited it by turning them into illegal torture factories? Are your lips moving as you read this?
 
rpl
2014-03-27 09:32:49 PM  

LewDux: rpl: The Russian Empire was led by aristocrats and followed the same rules and principles as the rest of the world;

They sure did
[upload.wikimedia.org image 375x262]


I'm not sure what point a propagandic depiction of the British army in India by a Russian painter is supposed to make, could you elaborate?

the USSR was led by (often illiterate) thugs, who to the best of my knowledge followed no rules and held no principles whatsoever.

Same shiat, just in different hand


shiat has lots of factors; amount, freshness, body, note, texture, toxicity...
 
2014-03-27 09:35:55 PM  
 
2014-03-28 06:53:50 AM  

rpl: LewDux: rpl: The Russian Empire was led by aristocrats and followed the same rules and principles as the rest of the world;

They sure did
[upload.wikimedia.org image 375x262]

I'm not sure what point a propagandic depiction of the British army in India by a Russian painter is supposed to make, could you elaborate?


British used this method since 1760. Point is, I don't see how Russian Tsars were substantially better than Soviet commie-tsars
 
rpl
2014-03-28 03:09:08 PM  

LewDux: rpl: LewDux: rpl: The Russian Empire was led by aristocrats and followed the same rules and principles as the rest of the world;

They sure did
[upload.wikimedia.org image 375x262]

I'm not sure what point a propagandic depiction of the British army in India by a Russian painter is supposed to make, could you elaborate?

British used this method since 1760. Point is, I don't see how Russian Tsars were substantially better than Soviet commie-tsars


Thing is, that pic shows the exact opposite of your point; being blown away was a far better (and heck, let's face it, a lot more entertaining) alternative to being flogged to death, not to mention the fun stuff that the Indians were doing to each other before the British came.

Using the same subject as an illustration; the death penalty was barely existent and fading away fast in the RE, just like the rest of the world. Then the RE turned into the USSR and the numbers reached an all-time historic peak. So, yeah, shiat differs.
 
2014-03-28 06:01:01 PM  

rpl: Thing is, that pic shows the exact opposite of your point; being blown away was a far better (and heck, let's face it, a lot more entertaining) alternative to being flogged to death, not to mention the fun stuff that the Indians were doing to each other before the British came.


Result is the same.

rpl: So, yeah, shiat differs.


Maybe for shiater, but not for a shiatee (re-reads slowly) yeah!
 
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