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(Independent)   Ukraine gets $18 billion bailout package from International Monetary Fund, to be spent by Russian soldiers pressure-washing what's left of Ukraine protestors out of the tracks of their armored vehicles   (independent.co.uk) divider line 12
    More: Asinine  
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291 clicks; posted to Politics » on 27 Mar 2014 at 10:12 AM (44 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



12 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-27 11:36:25 AM  
So wait, we don't want to help them now?  Thanks Obama!
 
2014-03-27 11:46:14 AM  
Didnt this whole thing start over the Ukrainians owing Russia 9 Billion?
 
2014-03-27 12:41:44 PM  
There are 10-12 oligarchs in the Ukraine that will get all of this money. They will buy a few more expensive mansions in London and stuff the rest in some UK banks.

Ukraine tax payers will be paying this back after the Ukraine government is forced to sell off all if their assets to American/ European Banksters.

This will end like Ireland, forced austerity and all of the young people emigrating to find jobs.
 
2014-03-27 12:50:09 PM  

Heraclitus: Didnt this whole thing start over the Ukrainians owing Russia 9 Billion?


Yup. You see, Russia had a lease agreement for their military base in Crimea that was prepaid. Now Russia owns Crimea, because they took it over, so they think Ukraine should pay them back for the unused rent.

Seriously
 
2014-03-27 02:27:30 PM  

CPennypacker: Heraclitus: Didnt this whole thing start over the Ukrainians owing Russia 9 Billion?

Yup. You see, Russia had a lease agreement for their military base in Crimea that was prepaid. Now Russia owns Crimea, because they took it over, so they think Ukraine should pay them back for the unused rent.

Seriously


Well it does make sense. Russia no longer needs to rent Crimea any more.
 
2014-03-27 02:54:41 PM  

mcreadyblue: CPennypacker: Heraclitus: Didnt this whole thing start over the Ukrainians owing Russia 9 Billion?

Yup. You see, Russia had a lease agreement for their military base in Crimea that was prepaid. Now Russia owns Crimea, because they took it over, so they think Ukraine should pay them back for the unused rent.

Seriously

Well it does make sense. Russia no longer needs to rent Crimea any more.


I guess  you could say Ukraine annexed the rent
 
2014-03-27 03:38:40 PM  

Heraclitus: Didnt this whole thing start over the Ukrainians owing Russia 9 Billion?


No, it started when Yanukovych got elected, and promptly started looting the Ukrainian state and economy, spending what he stole to do things like build palaces for himself. He eventually bankrupted the state doing this and, when he went to EU banks to get a loan so Ukraine wouldn't default, they insisted that there be EU and parliamentary oversight on how the money gets spent to prevent him from misappropriating it again. Yanukovych didn't like that, so he asked Putin for a loan instead.

Putin's terms for that loan were that Yanukovych torpedo Ukraine's EU accession talks, torpedo their accession reform process, begin talks with Russia to join Putin's "Eurasian Economic Union" club of Russian puppet-dictatorships, and institute "political reforms" of his own which would bring Ukraine inline with the Russian legal conception of civic life. The reforms included making it illegal to protest publicly; declaring all but the far-right Svoboda party illegal in all but a few provinces thereby forcing much of the political opposition to either join it or face official persecution; reducing the power of Parliament and increasing the power of the Presidency; suppressing the Ukrainian culture and language while promoting Russian, and other similarly tyrannical things. Yanukovych was just fine with all of this.

His attempt to implement these "reforms" is what led to the Maidan protests, and Putin's refusal to accept that his decade+ attempt to subvert Ukrainian democracy had failed because he overplayed his hand led to where we are today. Hopefully, the Russian-speakers in Crimea, who I severely doubt truly support Putin and Russian accession as much as that referendum-at-gunpoint suggests, will quickly realize how restricted their political and economic rights under Russian rule are, and start agitating for reunification; at the very least it ought to make plain just how moronic the current batch of Putin-apologists trying to normalize this outrage, like Bill Maher, are.
 
2014-03-27 03:52:16 PM  

Heron: Heraclitus: Didnt this whole thing start over the Ukrainians owing Russia 9 Billion?

No, it started when Yanukovych got elected, and promptly started looting the Ukrainian state and economy, spending what he stole to do things like build palaces for himself. He eventually bankrupted the state doing this and, when he went to EU banks to get a loan so Ukraine wouldn't default, they insisted that there be EU and parliamentary oversight on how the money gets spent to prevent him from misappropriating it again. Yanukovych didn't like that, so he asked Putin for a loan instead.

Putin's terms for that loan were that Yanukovych torpedo Ukraine's EU accession talks, torpedo their accession reform process, begin talks with Russia to join Putin's "Eurasian Economic Union" club of Russian puppet-dictatorships, and institute "political reforms" of his own which would bring Ukraine inline with the Russian legal conception of civic life. The reforms included making it illegal to protest publicly; declaring all but the far-right Svoboda party illegal in all but a few provinces thereby forcing much of the political opposition to either join it or face official persecution; reducing the power of Parliament and increasing the power of the Presidency; suppressing the Ukrainian culture and language while promoting Russian, and other similarly tyrannical things. Yanukovych was just fine with all of this.

His attempt to implement these "reforms" is what led to the Maidan protests, and Putin's refusal to accept that his decade+ attempt to subvert Ukrainian democracy had failed because he overplayed his hand led to where we are today. Hopefully, the Russian-speakers in Crimea, who I severely doubt truly support Putin and Russian accession as much as that referendum-at-gunpoint suggests, will quickly realize how restricted their political and economic rights under Russian rule are, and start agitating for reunification; at the very least it ought to make plain just how moronic the current batch of Putin-apologists trying to normalize this outrage, like Bill Maher, are.


It started when GHWB promised Russia that NATO would not seek to expand into the former Warsaw Pact counties and then Clinton broke that promise.

An attempt to bring Ukraine into NATO would be the same as if Russia stationed troops and missiles in Cuba.
 
2014-03-27 04:14:23 PM  

Heron: No, it started when Yanukovych got elected, and promptly started looting the Ukrainian state and economy


Just a little fix here: Yanukovych got elected when the country already was properly looted by the previous administration. It was the reason he was elected: previous administration, pro-Western, have turned out to be a bunch of crooks and thieves, so in response people tried to elect the opposition - that was Yanukovich.

Of course, Yanukovich wasn't any better.
 
2014-03-27 04:18:25 PM  
By the way: in response to the conditions IMF demanded for that loan (rising taxes, lowering or cancelling most social programs, etc - proper austerity) Maidan is storming Ukrainian parliament. Again. Shouting about conspiracy and robbing the country and, of course, international moscow-jewish mafia. The solution, of course, is to hang the traitors - that's current Kiev's government.

*sigh*

Poor country. I sincerely hope that Parliament had time to get together some kind of loyal police. I wonder if it'll ever end.
 
2014-03-27 06:19:02 PM  
Great headline.  Probably won't win any awards but it is Fark awesome.

/ solid 9.0
 
2014-03-28 09:14:13 AM  
But wouldnt it be cheaper to just pay Putin off and set up a Ukrainian Democracy?

or would that lead to other dictators holding countries hostage?

It would have to be more cost effective than what we have gone through in Afghanistan and Iraq.
 
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