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(Huffington Post)   So it turns out that Russia really *did* warn the FBI about the Boston Marathon bombers. The FBI just can't spell   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 24
    More: Followup, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Boston Marathon, FBI, Russia, Tsarnaev, NBC News, Dagestan, FSB  
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14471 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Mar 2014 at 9:56 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-26 09:57:15 AM  
4 votes:
As a software engineer, the solution is to normalize the data. The unique key of relational data should never be a name, that's what UUIDs are for.

Suspect 135010234 cannot enter the country without being detained.

Fuzzy search any name, further narrow results upon multiple hits. If no number is found, bullet to the head or detain the individual based on the situation.

For those who think too highly of themselves to be reduced to a number, be aware software engineers don't give a fark.
2014-03-26 08:15:06 AM  
4 votes:
Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.
Esn
2014-03-26 10:05:57 AM  
3 votes:

dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.


It has been tried, many times. This is a huge problem in academia as well - I have to enter in 5 different spellings when I'm searching for Russian literature on the interlibrary databases and even then I sometimes miss things. You're never going to get everyone to agree on a standard - none of the standards are perfect, and there are some people who can't stand certain transliteration systems and vice versa (I prefer a version of British Standard, myself). The best thing to do would be to just use the original Cyrillic spellings.
2014-03-26 09:57:28 AM  
3 votes:

dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.


That's only going to work if the person you're tracking also follows that standard, instead of spelling his/her name however he wants to when he gets to the states.
2014-03-26 10:08:02 AM  
2 votes:
Stupid SpellCheck! Bring back proof-readers!
2014-03-26 02:34:08 PM  
1 votes:

Overfiend: Dont computers searching the list of 500K names kind of make your point moot? (Spelling errors aside)


You tell me: Seems like the guy was on a giant list. Seems like someone warned us specifically about a guy who was on our giant list. Then it seems like that guy killed a bunch of people despite the list and the warning.

Conclusion: the list is worth fark-all because there's so goddam many people on it and so many warnings are issued that even a trillion dollar security apparatus with thousands of operatives couldn't even begin to act on investigating all of them.

We could most certainly use a computer to look up his name real fast though. In fact, it sounds like his name was looked up on several occasions. Even investigated the guy. Then he and his little brother put some nails in a pressure cooker and blew up a parade.
2014-03-26 02:27:04 PM  
1 votes:

kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?


That is part of the problem.  Any one of them could have been a potential problem, but the vast majority probably wouldn't be.

So you'll exclude a whole bunch of people because of guilt by association, on the off chance you'll keep someone actually intent on doing harm out, but the system ain't perfect *AND* it relies on reporting by governments that are less than 100% trustworthy, both politically and data-wise.
2014-03-26 12:28:58 PM  
1 votes:

jshine: Invading fewer countries is a nice place to start (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.).  The tens/hundreds of thousands of locals who died in those wars have relatives and children, and some fraction of those will end up hating America -- and for good reason.


Pop quiz: why don't we have an onslaught of Vietnamese terrorists?  Or are they opening all those nail salons as a cover?  Also, where was the uptick in German, Italian, and Japanese-based terrorism after WWII?  You'd think dropping a couple of atomic bombs on the general populace would encourage hatred towards the dropper.  Perhaps, just maybe, some farking ethnicities are prone to hatred and blowing themselves up.  Quit being an apologist.
2014-03-26 12:18:59 PM  
1 votes:

zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?


Dismantle the ineffective and invasive security state and just make peace with taking one one the chin now and again.
2014-03-26 11:55:27 AM  
1 votes:
Convenient excuse to condition masses to be searched at public events. Maybe if we increased the US security budget it would help them spell .
2014-03-26 11:37:58 AM  
1 votes:

Arkanaut: dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.

That's only going to work if the person you're tracking also follows that standard, instead of spelling his/her name however he wants to when he gets to the states.


Or, to just mention a stupid idea, the FBI could have asked "Would you spell his name as is written on his passport/visa?" instead of guessing at it.
2014-03-26 10:56:42 AM  
1 votes:

zimbomba63: Yeah, there are going to be problems.  For as long as I can remember, the capital of Ukraine was spelled Kiev, now, during the crisis, people have started to spell it Kyev, for some reason.

And, yes, I understand some of these alphabet conversions go back a long time and things have gotten muddled.  It's like the conversion of Chinese spelling to Western spelling.  IIRC from my Chinese history classes, the system was set up by the Jesuits, centuries ago.  Even though Beijing was spelled Peking, by the Jesuit system, it would have still been pronounced Beijing.  It was Westerners unfamiliar with the rules of the Jesuit's system, that started pronouncing it as it was spelled.  I forget the reasoning behind the Jesuit system, but, it's been only in the last 40 or 50 years that things have gotten straightened out.  But, Kiev or Kyev, it's still pronounced the same farking way.


So, you are saying it could be "celebrate" and "celibate"?
2014-03-26 10:52:58 AM  
1 votes:
Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?
2014-03-26 10:40:35 AM  
1 votes:
Well at least the FBI got that Tuttle guy they were looking for.
2014-03-26 10:35:57 AM  
1 votes:
To add insult to injury, some websites still auto-play videos.  This is an outrage.
2014-03-26 10:35:55 AM  
1 votes:
Listen up, peeps.
You need to understand an important and inviolate rule of "intelligence" gathering that states that you cannot use that information AT ALL, EVEN TO SAVE LIVES, WIN BATTLES OR SAVE THE WORLD because you "might" reveal your source.

Yes, Virginia, stupid wins again.
2014-03-26 10:33:48 AM  
1 votes:
Like, if you're sent a warning about "Vladimir Ilyich Orlovskiy/ Владимир Ильич Орловский" and a guy named Vladymir Ilytch Orlavski shows up at your checkpoint, he probably shouldn't get through. If we're going to be daft enough to have a person's name as the only field in our query, the least we could do is represent it in the database as accurately as possible.
2014-03-26 10:33:41 AM  
1 votes:
Russia reports pretty much every Chechen that leaves the country as a terrorist.  It would be more surprising if they didn't warn us.  That's why stuff like this doesn't get taken more seriously.
2014-03-26 10:30:29 AM  
1 votes:

firefly212: The solution is obviously to spy on more Americans.


Yep, this and the fact that two different security breaches have occurred at One World Trade Center in a week means that they need to get busy and collect MORE phone/internet records because it works so well!
2014-03-26 10:26:35 AM  
1 votes:
Bush's fault!
2014-03-26 10:21:39 AM  
1 votes:
Christ that's retarded.  His passport would have had a unique identification number (not name-based) why the hell weren't they using that as a tracker instead of his name?
2014-03-26 10:09:06 AM  
1 votes:

dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.

 
Exactly my thought. But, even if this happened, it wouldn't help the part about the wrong Date of Birth. According the the FTA, the information change came from Russian officials. Ours was correct; there's included a different spelling of the name and in incorrect birth date.
2014-03-26 10:08:15 AM  
1 votes:

Flakeloaf: Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet?


Yes.  There are dozens of character sets around the world (some of which are huge, like the set of Chinese characters).  It's unrealistic to expect each gate agent, TSA employee, flight attendant, etc., to be able to read & pronounce every conceivable name in its native character set -- even if Unicode can handle representing the characters inside the computer.
2014-03-26 10:04:50 AM  
1 votes:
i645.photobucket.com
 
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