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(Huffington Post)   So it turns out that Russia really *did* warn the FBI about the Boston Marathon bombers. The FBI just can't spell   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 123
    More: Followup, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Boston Marathon, FBI, Russia, Tsarnaev, NBC News, Dagestan, FSB  
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14462 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Mar 2014 at 9:56 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



123 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-26 08:15:06 AM
Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.
 
2014-03-26 09:57:15 AM
As a software engineer, the solution is to normalize the data. The unique key of relational data should never be a name, that's what UUIDs are for.

Suspect 135010234 cannot enter the country without being detained.

Fuzzy search any name, further narrow results upon multiple hits. If no number is found, bullet to the head or detain the individual based on the situation.

For those who think too highly of themselves to be reduced to a number, be aware software engineers don't give a fark.
 
2014-03-26 09:57:28 AM

dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.


That's only going to work if the person you're tracking also follows that standard, instead of spelling his/her name however he wants to when he gets to the states.
 
2014-03-26 09:59:34 AM

dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.


You beat me to it.
 
2014-03-26 10:01:44 AM

Arkanaut: dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.

That's only going to work if the person you're tracking also follows that standard, instead of spelling his/her name however he wants to when he gets to the states.


You beat me to it.
 
2014-03-26 10:03:03 AM
Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet? A stupid person could learn Cryillic inside of a week, and Indic/Perso-Arabic/Southeast Asian scripts can just become a game of "Match the pictures" for a TSA agent.

Not that it would solve the inherent problems in basing an entire dataset on something as variable and arbitrary as someone's name without at least giving a passing nod to other useful descriptors. Like a date of birth, eye colour, prints etc.
 
2014-03-26 10:03:12 AM
Stop spending so much time watching people masturbate on webcam and do your damn job.
 
2014-03-26 10:04:12 AM
The solution is obviously to spy on more Americans.
 
2014-03-26 10:04:50 AM
i645.photobucket.com
 
Esn
2014-03-26 10:05:57 AM

dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.


It has been tried, many times. This is a huge problem in academia as well - I have to enter in 5 different spellings when I'm searching for Russian literature on the interlibrary databases and even then I sometimes miss things. You're never going to get everyone to agree on a standard - none of the standards are perfect, and there are some people who can't stand certain transliteration systems and vice versa (I prefer a version of British Standard, myself). The best thing to do would be to just use the original Cyrillic spellings.
 
2014-03-26 10:06:21 AM

Flakeloaf: A stupid person could learn Cryillic inside of a week,


All of them do.
 
2014-03-26 10:06:48 AM
It's comforting to know that they're still catching all the senior citizen and toddler terrorists though. You never hear of THEM bombing anyone, so shaking them down while letting the rest of the baddies through must work.

Right?
 
2014-03-26 10:08:02 AM
Stupid SpellCheck! Bring back proof-readers!
 
2014-03-26 10:08:15 AM

Flakeloaf: Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet?


Yes.  There are dozens of character sets around the world (some of which are huge, like the set of Chinese characters).  It's unrealistic to expect each gate agent, TSA employee, flight attendant, etc., to be able to read & pronounce every conceivable name in its native character set -- even if Unicode can handle representing the characters inside the computer.
 
2014-03-26 10:09:06 AM

dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.

 
Exactly my thought. But, even if this happened, it wouldn't help the part about the wrong Date of Birth. According the the FTA, the information change came from Russian officials. Ours was correct; there's included a different spelling of the name and in incorrect birth date.
 
2014-03-26 10:09:42 AM
See? See? That's why Putin is the bestest, dreamiest president EVAH!

/he would have nuked Watertown to get the terrists
 
2014-03-26 10:10:01 AM

firefly212: The solution is obviously to spy on more Americans.


Exactly.  If you spy on everyone, you don't have to worry about subtleties like "have I got the right target".
 
2014-03-26 10:10:57 AM
gonna change my name to "united stated official."
 
Esn
2014-03-26 10:13:09 AM
Or, you know, somebody could write a software on the basis of this table that would automatically transform any Russian name spelling into any one of the 11 major potential transliteration systems.

But really, just using the original Cyrillic spellings would be safest. Many of the Cyrillic letters are the same as the Latin ones, anyway.
 
2014-03-26 10:15:30 AM
Flakeloaf: "Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet?"

The aforementioned software engineers who don't give a fark about reducing you to a number?  As it turns out they very much give a fark about not having to support Unicode characters.
Sometimes, for understandable reasons (decision-makers won't accept increased cost/time estimates; underlying libraries don't support it; legacy systems don't support it; it can be very hard to do Unicode properly across a large project because so many programmers just don't deal with it.)

But rarely for actual *good* reasons.

It's not unlike the resistance against the switch to metric.
 
2014-03-26 10:16:42 AM

Esn: Or, you know, somebody could write a software on the basis of this table that would automatically transform any Russian name spelling into any one of the 11 major potential transliteration systems.

But really, just using the original Cyrillic spellings would be safest. Many of the Cyrillic letters are the same as the Latin ones, anyway.


да
 
2014-03-26 10:18:53 AM
The FBI and CIA were too busy checking your search logs on miget amputee goat porn.

Good job American "intelligence."
 
2014-03-26 10:21:39 AM
Christ that's retarded.  His passport would have had a unique identification number (not name-based) why the hell weren't they using that as a tracker instead of his name?
 
2014-03-26 10:21:40 AM
told ya' so. Russians are evil!
 
2014-03-26 10:23:35 AM
Dear USA,

Someone set you up the bom.

kthxbye,

Russha
 
2014-03-26 10:24:05 AM

Random Anonymous Blackmail: The FBI and CIA were too busy checking your search logs on miget amputee goat porn.

Good job American "intelligence."


"Bad intelligence"

Team America already predicted this.
 
2014-03-26 10:26:35 AM
Bush's fault!
 
2014-03-26 10:27:44 AM

jshine: Flakeloaf: Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet?

Yes.  There are dozens of character sets around the world (some of which are huge, like the set of Chinese characters).  It's unrealistic to expect each gate agent, TSA employee, flight attendant, etc., to be able to read & pronounce every conceivable name in its native character set -- even if Unicode can handle representing the characters inside the computer.


All passports and travel documents are already printed in roman letters as well as their native language. I was thinking more of the federal police agencies that would be receiving intelligence broadcasts like the one that Russian intelligence agents said they sent. If Google can take a phonetic spelling and turn it into passable Cyrillic or Hindi or whatever then I would hope a federal security agency would be able to do at least as well.
 
2014-03-26 10:27:53 AM
The tragedy about things like this and the Plame outing by White House officials is countries will cease risking their intelligence networks. They're not going give us information we need because at the extrema we are either incompetent boobs or malevolent spewers of classified information.

I sincerely doubt we will have this sort of help from the Russians for a long time.
 
2014-03-26 10:28:14 AM
Does anybody know why they don't use facial recognition software?   That would take care of spelling etc.

That said, I don't know much about security, so maybe there is some reason they cannot use it.
 
2014-03-26 10:28:43 AM

ringersol: Flakeloaf: "Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet?"

The aforementioned software engineers who don't give a fark about reducing you to a number?  As it turns out they very much give a fark about not having to support Unicode characters.
Sometimes, for understandable reasons (decision-makers won't accept increased cost/time estimates; underlying libraries don't support it; legacy systems don't support it; it can be very hard to do Unicode properly across a large project because so many programmers just don't deal with it.)

But rarely for actual *good* reasons.

It's not unlike the resistance against the switch to metric.


If it is for the US government, shouldnt the platform support Unicode? Isnt that the point of all the bullshiat standards that must be met by companies who deal in government contracts?

Yeah, some bullshiat Database might not support a Unicode query, but the government uses big ass iron with big ass databases. You just arent going to get a cheap DB that will outperform the big iron. And the big ass DBs all support Unicode.

So, my bet is on gubmint incompetence, not software.
 
2014-03-26 10:30:29 AM

firefly212: The solution is obviously to spy on more Americans.


Yep, this and the fact that two different security breaches have occurred at One World Trade Center in a week means that they need to get busy and collect MORE phone/internet records because it works so well!
 
2014-03-26 10:33:41 AM
Russia reports pretty much every Chechen that leaves the country as a terrorist.  It would be more surprising if they didn't warn us.  That's why stuff like this doesn't get taken more seriously.
 
2014-03-26 10:33:48 AM
Like, if you're sent a warning about "Vladimir Ilyich Orlovskiy/ Владимир Ильич Орловский" and a guy named Vladymir Ilytch Orlavski shows up at your checkpoint, he probably shouldn't get through. If we're going to be daft enough to have a person's name as the only field in our query, the least we could do is represent it in the database as accurately as possible.
 
2014-03-26 10:35:55 AM
Listen up, peeps.
You need to understand an important and inviolate rule of "intelligence" gathering that states that you cannot use that information AT ALL, EVEN TO SAVE LIVES, WIN BATTLES OR SAVE THE WORLD because you "might" reveal your source.

Yes, Virginia, stupid wins again.
 
2014-03-26 10:35:57 AM
To add insult to injury, some websites still auto-play videos.  This is an outrage.
 
2014-03-26 10:37:49 AM

Bin_jammin: It's comforting to know that they're still catching all the senior citizen and toddler terrorists though. You never hear of THEM bombing anyone, so shaking them down while letting the rest of the baddies through must work.

Right?


CSB:
  I'm going through security risk assessment for my job, which is sorta along the lines of the movie "Outbreak."  I have what I think is a pretty Anglo-Saxon name, I am an American citizen born to military parents at a base in Europe.  Going through the process with me are an Ethiopian, a Chinese, and a Venezuelan.  Guess who gets pulled aside for extra paperwork and a shakedown?
 /CSB
 
2014-03-26 10:38:35 AM
seattle98.files.wordpress.com
"I have a gub..."
 
2014-03-26 10:40:35 AM
Well at least the FBI got that Tuttle guy they were looking for.
 
2014-03-26 10:41:10 AM
This is how Osama Bon Ladden got through security for so many years after 9/11.
 
2014-03-26 10:41:26 AM

flak attack: Russia reports pretty much every Chechen that leaves the country as a terrorist.  It would be more surprising if they didn't warn us.  That's why stuff like this doesn't get taken more seriously.


This. I'm wondering how many thousands of reports the FBI gets every day. I pity them, since missing a single one means they're blamed for lack of vigilance, increasing their oppressive police state mentality.

/Which doesn't absolve them of the genuine farkups they're known for.
 
2014-03-26 10:42:12 AM

Clent: As a software engineer, the solution is to normalize the data. The unique key of relational data should never be a name, that's what UUIDs are for.

Suspect 135010234 cannot enter the country without being detained.

Fuzzy search any name, further narrow results upon multiple hits. If no number is found, bullet to the head or detain the individual based on the situation.

For those who think too highly of themselves to be reduced to a number, be aware software engineers don't give a fark.


You misspelled your screen name.
 
2014-03-26 10:45:48 AM
Don't the Russian warn the US about *every* Chechen in the United States?
 
2014-03-26 10:49:46 AM
Yeah, there are going to be problems.  For as long as I can remember, the capital of Ukraine was spelled Kiev, now, during the crisis, people have started to spell it Kyev, for some reason.

And, yes, I understand some of these alphabet conversions go back a long time and things have gotten muddled.  It's like the conversion of Chinese spelling to Western spelling.  IIRC from my Chinese history classes, the system was set up by the Jesuits, centuries ago.  Even though Beijing was spelled Peking, by the Jesuit system, it would have still been pronounced Beijing.  It was Westerners unfamiliar with the rules of the Jesuit's system, that started pronouncing it as it was spelled.  I forget the reasoning behind the Jesuit system, but, it's been only in the last 40 or 50 years that things have gotten straightened out.  But, Kiev or Kyev, it's still pronounced the same farking way.
 
2014-03-26 10:52:00 AM
We're getting Kyiv here. Psy yi yi.
 
2014-03-26 10:52:05 AM
We need a tag/indicator that the link has autoplay video content. Or else I should stop Farking in a call center, one or the other.
 
2014-03-26 10:52:58 AM
Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?
 
2014-03-26 10:56:42 AM

zimbomba63: Yeah, there are going to be problems.  For as long as I can remember, the capital of Ukraine was spelled Kiev, now, during the crisis, people have started to spell it Kyev, for some reason.

And, yes, I understand some of these alphabet conversions go back a long time and things have gotten muddled.  It's like the conversion of Chinese spelling to Western spelling.  IIRC from my Chinese history classes, the system was set up by the Jesuits, centuries ago.  Even though Beijing was spelled Peking, by the Jesuit system, it would have still been pronounced Beijing.  It was Westerners unfamiliar with the rules of the Jesuit's system, that started pronouncing it as it was spelled.  I forget the reasoning behind the Jesuit system, but, it's been only in the last 40 or 50 years that things have gotten straightened out.  But, Kiev or Kyev, it's still pronounced the same farking way.


So, you are saying it could be "celebrate" and "celibate"?
 
2014-03-26 10:56:54 AM
FTFA:
U.S. officials have said a misspelling of Tsarnaev's name on flight records may have contributed to some law enforcement agencies not being alerted to his movements.

The FBI is in charge of maintaining flight records now?
 
2014-03-26 10:57:20 AM
not "celibate".
 
2014-03-26 11:03:13 AM

snocone: zimbomba63: Yeah, there are going to be problems.  For as long as I can remember, the capital of Ukraine was spelled Kiev, now, during the crisis, people have started to spell it Kyev, for some reason.

And, yes, I understand some of these alphabet conversions go back a long time and things have gotten muddled.  It's like the conversion of Chinese spelling to Western spelling.  IIRC from my Chinese history classes, the system was set up by the Jesuits, centuries ago.  Even though Beijing was spelled Peking, by the Jesuit system, it would have still been pronounced Beijing.  It was Westerners unfamiliar with the rules of the Jesuit's system, that started pronouncing it as it was spelled.  I forget the reasoning behind the Jesuit system, but, it's been only in the last 40 or 50 years that things have gotten straightened out.  But, Kiev or Kyev, it's still pronounced the same farking way.

So, you are saying it could be "celebrate" and "celibate"?


I don't know about that.  I'll have to axe somebody.
 
2014-03-26 11:07:19 AM

ringersol: Flakeloaf: "Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet?"

The aforementioned software engineers who don't give a fark about reducing you to a number?  As it turns out they very much give a fark about not having to support Unicode characters.
Sometimes, for understandable reasons (decision-makers won't accept increased cost/time estimates; underlying libraries don't support it; legacy systems don't support it; it can be very hard to do Unicode properly across a large project because so many programmers just don't deal with it.)

But rarely for actual *good* reasons.

It's not unlike the resistance against the switch to metric.


I'm in defense software, and have been beating this drum for years. Finally, we're starting to get some international sales, and guess what problem is biting us in the ass?
 
2014-03-26 11:09:24 AM

kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?


You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.

/'just one moment Mr Tsarnaev let me see if you are on this list of half a million people...'
 
2014-03-26 11:11:05 AM
Obviously, recording the cell phone calls of all Americans is now warranted by this failure.
 
2014-03-26 11:11:32 AM

JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.



Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.
 
2014-03-26 11:13:47 AM

Bin_jammin: It's comforting to know that they're still catching all the senior citizen and toddler terrorists though. You never hear of THEM bombing anyone, so shaking them down while letting the rest of the baddies through must work.

Right?


As someone who gets groped by the TSA every farking time I fly... that's not funny >:(

/last time it was because my bag had "suspcious cannisters." Camera lenses are very suspicious. More suspicious than my skin tone ("darker than khaki").
 
2014-03-26 11:14:01 AM

Random Anonymous Blackmail: The FBI and CIA were too busy checking your search logs on miget amputee goat porn.

Good job American "intelligence."


Hey they had warnings about 911 aswell.

At some point the American people have to wonder about criminal neglect vs incompetence
 
2014-03-26 11:19:37 AM
Russia warned the FBI about the bomber and we botched it. I wish I would have been able to botch being warned of an auto-playing video. Jeez subs, Russia's setting the pace and you need to keep up, da?
 
GBB
2014-03-26 11:22:37 AM
i1.ytimg.com
"It's like all the keys on a calculator you never use!"
 
2014-03-26 11:23:36 AM

Mr. Parker: Random Anonymous Blackmail: The FBI and CIA were too busy checking your search logs on miget amputee goat porn.

Good job American "intelligence."

"Bad intelligence"

Team America already predicted this.


img547.imageshack.us
I'm sorry.
 
2014-03-26 11:23:45 AM

kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?


Mother-stabbers. Father-rapers. Occasionally, we get enough of 'em on one flight, and then we send that plane-load to Malaysia.
 
2014-03-26 11:25:53 AM
Any particular reason they don't match on soundslike rather than byte by byte comparison?
 
2014-03-26 11:26:36 AM

TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.


It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.
 
2014-03-26 11:31:32 AM

JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.


Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?
 
2014-03-26 11:32:49 AM
"Let's see.....Tamerlan Tsarnaev....nope.  Got a 'Tamerlan Tsarnayev' though.  Must be a completely different guy."
 
2014-03-26 11:37:58 AM

Arkanaut: dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.

That's only going to work if the person you're tracking also follows that standard, instead of spelling his/her name however he wants to when he gets to the states.


Or, to just mention a stupid idea, the FBI could have asked "Would you spell his name as is written on his passport/visa?" instead of guessing at it.
 
2014-03-26 11:44:07 AM
Logan? Yummmm-eeee!! Wow!

I need to get out of the apartment.
 
2014-03-26 11:51:01 AM

blatz514: [i645.photobucket.com image 499x243]


TOBUSCUS!

/FBI, that's a fail
 
2014-03-26 11:53:54 AM
Good thing his name wasn't Gaddafi, we'd still be looking for him.
 
2014-03-26 11:55:27 AM
Convenient excuse to condition masses to be searched at public events. Maybe if we increased the US security budget it would help them spell .
 
2014-03-26 11:58:03 AM

Flakeloaf: Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet? A stupid person could learn Cryillic inside of a week,

Actually as somebody that took 4 years of Russian language study and recently traveled to Russia.  Cyrillic is hard for western language speakers because it uses many of the same characters but often in different pronunciations.  This is a big deal when learning Russian.  You have to re-wire your basic language centers to account for it (I don't have access to Psych-Lit anymore but I remember reading a study on this)

 
2014-03-26 12:05:50 PM
That's a convenient story ..
 
2014-03-26 12:05:51 PM

Arkanaut: dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.

That's only going to work if the person you're tracking also follows that standard, instead of spelling his/her name however he wants to when he gets to the states.


Whatever name appears in his pasport is the interesting one. He wouldn't have been able to change that.
 
2014-03-26 12:10:02 PM

darkmayo: Well at least the FBI got that Tuttle guy they were looking for.


That's Turtle.
 
2014-03-26 12:11:22 PM

zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?



Stop making so many terrorists who have a motivation to cause death & destruction, then defense of so many targets becomes a less critical problem.
 
2014-03-26 12:16:21 PM

jshine: zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?


Stop making so many terrorists who have a motivation to cause death & destruction, then defense of so many targets becomes a less critical problem.


Nice idea!  Once again, the solution is....?

Oh, one further question, how did we make Chechen terrorists?
 
2014-03-26 12:18:59 PM

zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?


Dismantle the ineffective and invasive security state and just make peace with taking one one the chin now and again.
 
2014-03-26 12:19:28 PM
The guy was in the US on a green card.  He would have a permanent resident ID.  There's no excuse for for this other than sheer incompetence.

We've got this f'd up system where we treat everyone as a potential terrorist and bust Indian diplomats for underpaying their maids.  However, when we have clear, direct intelligence that someone is a threat, it doesn't get the attention it deserves.  This is the same pathetic excuse they used for the underwear bomber.  The guy's father went to the US embassy and said "my son is a terrorist" yet he gets to board a plane to the US because of a misspelling.
 
2014-03-26 12:20:27 PM

Bin_jammin: It's comforting to know that they're still catching all the senior citizen and toddler terrorists though. You never hear of THEM bombing anyone, so shaking them down while letting the rest of the baddies through must work.

Right?


You must be a racist.
 
2014-03-26 12:21:12 PM

Clent: As a software engineer, the solution is to normalize the data. The unique key of relational data should never be a name, that's what UUIDs are for.


Twenty years ago, Mrs Clam was working for a book packager that was producing a big book of movie reviews. They didn't understand this simple concept and instead used title as the key. Then they distributed the content for each review between reviewers, typists in foreign lands, and researchers who entered in information such as year, run time, and awards it won.

The resulting data merge did not go well.  Turns out that some movies are released under different titles in different countries, movies can have the same title, some movies are sorted with "The" as a prefix or not, and so on. The data cleanup required was astonishing, and hundreds of errors made it to press for the first edition.
 
2014-03-26 12:21:44 PM
Lost in translation.

I took a year of Russian. The quality of the translation depends on the quality of the education of the person doing it. Even with the variations, it would seem like an easy task to search those in whatever database the FBI uses. If they use one. Or several, or whatever.

Computers, how werk them.
 
2014-03-26 12:22:10 PM

zimbomba63: jshine: zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?


Stop making so many terrorists who have a motivation to cause death & destruction, then defense of so many targets becomes a less critical problem.

Nice idea!  Once again, the solution is....?

Oh, one further question, how did we make Chechen terrorists?


With the Iraq war.
 
2014-03-26 12:22:42 PM

zimbomba63: Nice idea! Once again, the solution is....?


Invading fewer countries is a nice place to start (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.).  The tens/hundreds of thousands of locals who died in those wars have relatives and children, and some fraction of those will end up hating America -- and for good reason.

Generally, having a large military presence outside your own country is bound to cause problems.
 
2014-03-26 12:23:14 PM

zimbomba63: Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?


You want me to tell you the solution to stopping terrorism? You can't. If someone is willing to blow themselves up or leave a bomb with a timer somewhere there's not all that much you can do about it. In the meantime I think terrorists have shown that there are plenty on non-airline targets available. We all see the published stories about the testing failures where they get fake bombs through security time and again. Hell the former head of the TSA said it's 'security theater' and he's right. So why am I walking around the airport in my socks? I don't doubt our unwieldy apparatus has produced something. But no, I don't think it's worth what we have paid for it in time money, resources and inconvenience. Our giant lists did a great job of producing warnings on bin laden and tsaernev. Good thing we had those lists. Hell even the shoe bomber apprehension featured a retarded guy who was able to get explosives on the plane. Air marshals and a locked secure door are plenty - in the meantime I'd like to leave my shoes on and not get felt up or irradiated by the guys who can't find the fake bomb the secret service guy has in his backpack.
 
2014-03-26 12:25:02 PM

Cold_Sassy: Does anybody know why they don't use facial recognition software?   That would take care of spelling etc.

That said, I don't know much about security, so maybe there is some reason they cannot use it.


Ima gonna guess that you are not a software engineer...
 
2014-03-26 12:25:11 PM

jshine: Invading fewer countries is a nice place to start (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.).


Yes. Bring home the terrorist creation machine and invade countries that did not invade or attack you first.
 
2014-03-26 12:28:58 PM

jshine: Invading fewer countries is a nice place to start (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.).  The tens/hundreds of thousands of locals who died in those wars have relatives and children, and some fraction of those will end up hating America -- and for good reason.


Pop quiz: why don't we have an onslaught of Vietnamese terrorists?  Or are they opening all those nail salons as a cover?  Also, where was the uptick in German, Italian, and Japanese-based terrorism after WWII?  You'd think dropping a couple of atomic bombs on the general populace would encourage hatred towards the dropper.  Perhaps, just maybe, some farking ethnicities are prone to hatred and blowing themselves up.  Quit being an apologist.
 
2014-03-26 12:31:18 PM

Cold_Sassy: Does anybody know why they don't use facial recognition software?   That would take care of spelling etc.

That said, I don't know much about security, so maybe there is some reason they cannot use it.


Reliability. Even if you correctly recognized the intended subject every time, if you have a .01% false positive rate, you would have tens of thousands of false positives per day given the througput of international airports.
 
2014-03-26 12:36:42 PM

Unimpressed Man: Cold_Sassy: Does anybody know why they don't use facial recognition software?   That would take care of spelling etc.

That said, I don't know much about security, so maybe there is some reason they cannot use it.

Reliability. Even if you correctly recognized the intended subject every time, if you have a .01% false positive rate, you would have tens of thousands of false positives per day given the througput of international airports.


There is also a disparate treatment/constitutionality issue if you are judging based on appearance.
 
2014-03-26 12:37:55 PM
Hey give Holder's brown shirts a little more R-S-P-E-C-T than that.
 
2014-03-26 12:41:10 PM

TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.


Actually the list contains all combat vets with string religious beliefs, regardless of the flavor.  Fat Janet identified them all as a threat 3 years ago.
 
2014-03-26 12:41:29 PM
They were too busy spying on our own citizens to give a shiat. In fact I wouldn't put it past them to just let it 'em bomb in order to generate just that much more fear so we are willing to give up a few more rights so we can feel safe from boogie men.
 
2014-03-26 12:42:56 PM
Yep and if the FBI spent 1% of the effort on that MEMO THEY HAD, that they expended following, harassing and assaulting ME for the last 20 years, the Boston bombing wouldn't have happened!!

Fark you, counterintelligence gangstalkers!!!
 
2014-03-26 12:43:02 PM

Flakeloaf: Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet? A stupid person could learn Cryillic inside of a week, and Indic/Perso-Arabic/Southeast Asian scripts can just become a game of "Match the pictures" for a TSA agent.


Esn: The best thing to do would be to just use the original Cyrillic spellings.


Esn: But really, just using the original Cyrillic spellings would be safest. Many of the Cyrillic letters are the same as the Latin ones, anyway.


Next up on Fox and Friends: President Obama!  We've always known he has Marxist sympathies, but now... he's forcing Homeland Security to read and write in Russian!  And now there are hints that he's going to do the same with Arabic!  Last I heard, English was the official language of America.  But not in Obama's America! Have the terrorists won the culture war?  More on this, right after the break...
 
2014-03-26 12:46:27 PM

floyddabarber: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

Actually the list contains all combat vets with string religious beliefs, regardless of the flavor.  Fat Janet identified them all as a threat 3 years ago.


To be fair, they did accept a job where they would be killing people for money.
 
2014-03-26 12:47:19 PM

BullBearMS: Stop spending so much time watching people masturbate on webcam and do your damn job.


no
 
2014-03-26 12:53:02 PM

Ned Stark: zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?

Dismantle the ineffective and invasive security state and just make peace with taking one one the chin now and again.


So attempting to protect your self causes criminal activity and being assaulted, robbed, etc. should be considered just "life in the big city", is that what you're saying?  And then, eventually, they will get tired of occasionally punching us in the face or it just won't be fun anymore for them, huh?  This is novel idea!
 
2014-03-26 12:56:12 PM

walkerhound: jshine: Invading fewer countries is a nice place to start (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.).  The tens/hundreds of thousands of locals who died in those wars have relatives and children, and some fraction of those will end up hating America -- and for good reason.

Pop quiz: why don't we have an onslaught of Vietnamese terrorists?  Or are they opening all those nail salons as a cover?  Also, where was the uptick in German, Italian, and Japanese-based terrorism after WWII?  You'd think dropping a couple of atomic bombs on the general populace would encourage hatred towards the dropper.  Perhaps, just maybe, some farking ethnicities are prone to hatred and blowing themselves up.  Quit being an apologist.



It's not an either-or question.  You're probably right that there are significant cultural issues at play that make terrorism more likely in some countries than others.  We don't have control over that.  What we do have control over is how we act towards other countries.  Giving anyone a reason to hate us is a bad idea.  The fact that some people/countries/cultures may not actually feel that hatred, or may not act on it, is sheer dumb luck on our part.  You're right -- it's very fortunate that there aren't Vietnamese terrorists blowing up buildings (or there weren't in the 60's & 70's when it was more current).
 
2014-03-26 01:02:09 PM

jshine: walkerhound: jshine: Invading fewer countries is a nice place to start (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.).  The tens/hundreds of thousands of locals who died in those wars have relatives and children, and some fraction of those will end up hating America -- and for good reason.

Pop quiz: why don't we have an onslaught of Vietnamese terrorists?  Or are they opening all those nail salons as a cover?  Also, where was the uptick in German, Italian, and Japanese-based terrorism after WWII?  You'd think dropping a couple of atomic bombs on the general populace would encourage hatred towards the dropper.  Perhaps, just maybe, some farking ethnicities are prone to hatred and blowing themselves up.  Quit being an apologist.


It's not an either-or question.  You're probably right that there are significant cultural issues at play that make terrorism more likely in some countries than others.  We don't have control over that.  What we do have control over is how we act towards other countries.  Giving anyone a reason to hate us is a bad idea.  The fact that some people/countries/cultures may not actually feel that hatred, or may not act on it, is sheer dumb luck on our part.  You're right -- it's very fortunate that there aren't Vietnamese terrorists blowing up buildings (or there weren't in the 60's & 70's when it was more current).


Or, to quote an old saying:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
The courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.
 
2014-03-26 01:12:00 PM

JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.

/'just one moment Mr Tsarnaev let me see if you are on this list of half a million people...'


Dont computers searching the list of 500K names kind of make your point moot?  (Spelling errors aside)
 
2014-03-26 01:19:58 PM
Just like how Mao Tse-tung got a meeting with Nixon by using a different spelling of his name: Mao Zedong. Also by leading Nixon to believe that he was in Beijing, when in fact he was really in Peking.

CURSE YOU PINYIN!
 
2014-03-26 01:26:06 PM

waterrockets: I'm in defense software, and have been beating this drum for years. Finally, we're starting to get some international sales, and guess what problem is biting us in the ass?


The backdoors you built in for the NSA?
 
2014-03-26 01:28:14 PM

zimbomba63: Ned Stark: zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?

Dismantle the ineffective and invasive security state and just make peace with taking one one the chin now and again.

So attempting to protect your self causes criminal activity and being assaulted, robbed, etc. should be considered just "life in the big city", is that what you're saying?  And then, eventually, they will get tired of occasionally punching us in the face or it just won't be fun anymore for them, huh?  This is novel idea!


Were talking about the day to day operation of a state comprised of many millions of individuals not a "self", this particular branch of the conversation is about responses not causes, street crime is not at all of the same character as political violence, and no one claimed that anything would stop be it from boredom or otherwise.

But besides all that, sick burn. I'm really feeling the bite.
 
2014-03-26 01:46:45 PM
But it's very important that we build exabyte-scale data centers to store my phone and Internet records. Amirite, NSA?
 
2014-03-26 01:49:02 PM
Also, today's word of the day is Soundex .  Can you big-shot IT pros at the FBI say "Soundex"?  I knew you could!
 
2014-03-26 01:51:09 PM

zimbomba63: So attempting to protect your self causes criminal activity and being assaulted, robbed, etc. should be considered just "life in the big city", is that what you're saying?  And then, eventually, they will get tired of occasionally punching us in the face or it just won't be fun anymore for them, huh?  This is novel idea!


Yes.  Run the numbers.  You can pay for a lot of planes and buildings if you skip a trillion dollar war now and again, and the body count will be lower too.
 
2014-03-26 02:22:43 PM

Esn: Many of the Cyrillic letters are the same as the Latin ones, anyway.


And many Cyrillic letters look like Latin letters, but aren't.

C, H, P, Y, for starters. No chance for mistakes there...
 
2014-03-26 02:27:04 PM

kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?


That is part of the problem.  Any one of them could have been a potential problem, but the vast majority probably wouldn't be.

So you'll exclude a whole bunch of people because of guilt by association, on the off chance you'll keep someone actually intent on doing harm out, but the system ain't perfect *AND* it relies on reporting by governments that are less than 100% trustworthy, both politically and data-wise.
 
2014-03-26 02:34:08 PM

Overfiend: Dont computers searching the list of 500K names kind of make your point moot? (Spelling errors aside)


You tell me: Seems like the guy was on a giant list. Seems like someone warned us specifically about a guy who was on our giant list. Then it seems like that guy killed a bunch of people despite the list and the warning.

Conclusion: the list is worth fark-all because there's so goddam many people on it and so many warnings are issued that even a trillion dollar security apparatus with thousands of operatives couldn't even begin to act on investigating all of them.

We could most certainly use a computer to look up his name real fast though. In fact, it sounds like his name was looked up on several occasions. Even investigated the guy. Then he and his little brother put some nails in a pressure cooker and blew up a parade.
 
2014-03-26 02:35:15 PM
Expecting the "intelligence" community to ever prevent any attack is like expecting TSA to provide real airline security.

Folks, it is just not the job you were told they perform.
 
2014-03-26 02:48:54 PM

DeaH: dittybopper: Standardize the transliteration from Cyrillic to Latin alphabets.  Pick a standard, and stick to that standard.
 
Exactly my thought. But, even if this happened, it wouldn't help the part about the wrong Date of Birth. According the the FTA, the information change came from Russian officials. Ours was correct; there's included a different spelling of the name and in incorrect birth date.


The data issue doesn't surprise me one bit.  Twice a year for my job I need clearance from either TSA/MSP/Massport (blanking on who specifically does it right at the moment) to work behind the gates at Logan.  In three years I think they've got my info right once.  Either it's misspelling my last name (even when it's *typed* into the system!) or mis-entering my DOB.  Either way it's been nothing but a giant pain in the ass every time I've gone there.  So to hear that there's problems with that sort of thing in the system in my state? Zero surprise.
 
2014-03-26 03:48:07 PM

try fect taa daa: gonna change my name to "united stated official."

How 'bout "Osama BEN Laden?"

 
2014-03-26 04:03:17 PM

Man On Pink Corner: zimbomba63: So attempting to protect your self causes criminal activity and being assaulted, robbed, etc. should be considered just "life in the big city", is that what you're saying?  And then, eventually, they will get tired of occasionally punching us in the face or it just won't be fun anymore for them, huh?  This is novel idea!

Yes.  Run the numbers.  You can pay for a lot of planes and buildings if you skip a trillion dollar war now and again, and the body count will be lower too.


No kidding, I've looked at the casualty figures for the Afghan war and it's 2,315 dead to date.  How many people died on 9/11? I'll let you look that one up.
 
2014-03-26 04:16:20 PM

Ned Stark: zimbomba63: Ned Stark: zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?

Dismantle the ineffective and invasive security state and just make peace with taking one one the chin now and again.

So attempting to protect your self causes criminal activity and being assaulted, robbed, etc. should be considered just "life in the big city", is that what you're saying?  And then, eventually, they will get tired of occasionally punching us in the face or it just won't be fun anymore for them, huh?  This is novel idea!

Were talking about the day to day operation of a state comprised of many millions of individuals not a "self", this particular branch of the conversation is about responses not causes, street crime is not at all of the same character as political violence, and no one claimed that anything would stop be it from boredom ...


Well, that's odd, because those who were against the Afghan war, stated that it was more a police matter, you Interpol would arrest them somehow, and not a military matter.

So we're going to "make peace with taking one on the chin now and again."  Is your stupidity of a terminal nature?  I mean, do people have to remind you to breathe every now and then?  If so, they should stop doing that for everyone's sake.

When you're numb from the neck up, you're not expected to feel any "burn".
 
2014-03-26 04:40:04 PM

jshine: Giving anyone a reason to hate us is a bad idea.


Like, say, invading other people's countries and then routinely murdering innocent women and children?

As reported in the New York Times last week, a significant number of innocent Afghans continue to be killed by US and NATO forces despite new rules issued by Gen. Stanley McChrystal meant to help reduce civilian casualties. Indeed, the number of Afghans who have been killed or hurt by troop shootings at convoys and military checkpoints has basically remained the same since McChrystal announced his directives.

"We have shot an amazing number of people, but to my knowledge, none has ever proven to be a threat," said McChrystal during a recent video-conference with troops, the Times reported.


Or, heck, just routinely murdering innocent women and children without bothering to invade their country first.

dl.dropboxusercontent.com

I'm sure that if some other country invaded the United States and started routinely murdering innocent women and children nobody here would go all WOLVERINES! or anything.
 
2014-03-26 06:09:13 PM
You're all overlooking the most important fact...

The anchorwoman in that video is HOT!
 
2014-03-26 07:03:34 PM

zimbomba63: Ned Stark: zimbomba63: Ned Stark: zimbomba63: JohnBigBootay: TheShavingofOccam123: JohnBigBootay: kindms: Um. I think the biggest question is why on a single day there are over 100 people on some kind of HOT LIST passing in and out of JFK airport. So many it seems that a real threat was able to pass by simply because there were so many.

Who and what are on that list ? that is a busy airport sure but a single day and there are 99+ more nasty people or whatever on the list ?

You can thank the US intelligence communities 'let's make a list and throw money at it' management style. They have over 20k people on the no-fly list and a half million on the terrorism watch list... rendering both lists largely useless.


Including the names of US combat veterans who have converted to Islam. Fighting for the country is okay, worshiping in a different faith is a problem.

It's maddening. What we have is a target rich environment. We set up this leviathan idiotic infrastructure around air travel so the next target will be a barge into a bridge at rush hour, an oil platform, gasoline tanker, or a suicide moron at the mall. We're doing it the wrong way. And ineffectively at that.

Obviously, you've studied this out, so, the solution is.....?

Dismantle the ineffective and invasive security state and just make peace with taking one one the chin now and again.

So attempting to protect your self causes criminal activity and being assaulted, robbed, etc. should be considered just "life in the big city", is that what you're saying?  And then, eventually, they will get tired of occasionally punching us in the face or it just won't be fun anymore for them, huh?  This is novel idea!

Were talking about the day to day operation of a state comprised of many millions of individuals not a "self", this particular branch of the conversation is about responses not causes, street crime is not at all of the same character as political violence, and no one claimed that anything would stop be it fr ...


You're the only one who has brought up interpol, but enjoy kicking around that straw.
 
2014-03-26 07:48:31 PM
Another win for the Obama administration.
 
2014-03-26 08:08:25 PM

zimbomba63: No kidding, I've looked at the casualty figures for the Afghan war and it's 2,315 dead to date.  How many people died on 9/11? I'll let you look that one up.


Gee, that's a bit one-sided, don't you think?  How about the 100,000+ who died in Iraq because we just had to indulge your "Get your war on!" impulse?
 
2014-03-26 09:09:16 PM

Man On Pink Corner: zimbomba63: No kidding, I've looked at the casualty figures for the Afghan war and it's 2,315 dead to date.  How many people died on 9/11? I'll let you look that one up.

Gee, that's a bit one-sided, don't you think?  How about the 100,000+ who died in Iraq because we just had to indulge your "Get your war on!" impulse?


"Hey look, there go the goalposts!"

Anyway, by "your....impulse?"  Wow, didn't know I had such power as a lowly GS-13.  Dammit, what the hell did I sign off on?  And I should have gotten "higher graded duties" pay, too.
 
2014-03-26 09:21:38 PM

Parthenogenetic: Flakeloaf: Is there a problem with spelling the name in its original alphabet? A stupid person could learn Cryillic inside of a week, and Indic/Perso-Arabic/Southeast Asian scripts can just become a game of "Match the pictures" for a TSA agent.

Esn: The best thing to do would be to just use the original Cyrillic spellings.

Esn: But really, just using the original Cyrillic spellings would be safest. Many of the Cyrillic letters are the same as the Latin ones, anyway.

Next up on Fox and Friends: President Obama!  We've always known he has Marxist sympathies, but now... he's forcing Homeland Security to read and write in Russian!  And now there are hints that he's going to do the same with Arabic!  Last I heard, English was the official language of America.  But not in Obama's America! Have the terrorists won the culture war?  More on this, right after the break...


Haha! Gold Jerry, Gold!

It should have ended with "And here's Tom with the weather!" though. 9.9/10 sir.
 
2014-03-26 09:25:11 PM

jshine: jshine: walkerhound: jshine: Invading fewer countries is a nice place to start (e.g., Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.).  The tens/hundreds of thousands of locals who died in those wars have relatives and children, and some fraction of those will end up hating America -- and for good reason.

Pop quiz: why don't we have an onslaught of Vietnamese terrorists?  Or are they opening all those nail salons as a cover?  Also, where was the uptick in German, Italian, and Japanese-based terrorism after WWII?  You'd think dropping a couple of atomic bombs on the general populace would encourage hatred towards the dropper.  Perhaps, just maybe, some farking ethnicities are prone to hatred and blowing themselves up.  Quit being an apologist.


It's not an either-or question.  You're probably right that there are significant cultural issues at play that make terrorism more likely in some countries than others.  We don't have control over that.  What we do have control over is how we act towards other countries.  Giving anyone a reason to hate us is a bad idea.  The fact that some people/countries/cultures may not actually feel that hatred, or may not act on it, is sheer dumb luck on our part.  You're right -- it's very fortunate that there aren't Vietnamese terrorists blowing up buildings (or there weren't in the 60's & 70's when it was more current).

Or, to quote an old saying:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
The courage to change the things I can,
And wisdom to know the difference.


I'm stuck on step one still.
 
2014-03-27 01:40:45 AM

zimbomba63: "Hey look, there go the goalposts!"


Couldn't have put it better myself.
 
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