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(KHOU Houston)   Don't you hate it when you sign up for an easy introductory class in chemistry so you can maintain your 4.0 GPA but your teacher makes a mistake and all semester teaches an advance course in chemistry and you only get a B?   (khou.com) divider line 104
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6179 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Mar 2014 at 8:11 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-26 02:05:48 AM
In college, to graduate on time with a double-major, I took some summer courses one year. So after having completed a spring semester with 300-level courses in a major, I found myself in something like a 108 class just because I needed X credits out of a list. The professor was a bit confused as to why I was in there until I explained it.
 
2014-03-26 07:47:54 AM
i signed up for what i thought was "rocks for jocks," but it turned out to be intro to geology for geology majors. i should have known when i entered the class. instead of a lecture hall of 800 students, it was a small room with 15 students and two professors.

/got a B
// pretty proud of that
 
2014-03-26 08:18:15 AM

FlashHarry: i signed up for what i thought was "rocks for jocks," but it turned out to be intro to geology for geology majors. i should have known when i entered the class. instead of a lecture hall of 800 students, it was a small room with 15 students and two professors.

/got a B
// pretty proud of that


Freshman year someone said "Art History is easy, take it to satisfy part of your Arts BDR's".  Instead of Art History 101, that was 8 AM Monday morning, I took Art History 105 - 16th Century Cathedrals.

Got a D.  All those farking arches look the same when you're high.
 
2014-03-26 08:18:38 AM
Nobody of any importance cares about the difference between a 3.9 and a 4.0.
 
2014-03-26 08:19:11 AM
Wait she had an F up to the final exam?   Why wouldn't she drop the class WAY before that?
 
GBB
2014-03-26 08:20:06 AM
Well, don't go all jump-out-a-window-to-your-death over it.
 
2014-03-26 08:20:54 AM

ArgusRun: Nobody of any importance cares about the difference between a 3.9 and a 4.0.


ftfy.
 
2014-03-26 08:22:06 AM
I was full-on blame-the-victim mode thinking, "what a whiner," before I clicked on the link.  Then I read TFA and am now sympathetic.

DoBeDoBeDo: Wait she had an F up to the final exam? Why wouldn't she drop the class WAY before that?


I am wondering the same thing.
 
2014-03-26 08:23:08 AM
A 1000 level class is not "advanced".  Lone Star College looks like a Junior College.  The student is snow flakey.  So much whining.

That is all.
 
GBB
2014-03-26 08:24:27 AM
What good is being a 4.0 student when you can't handle General Chemistry and require Intro to Chemistry to keep your grade up?
 
2014-03-26 08:27:17 AM
I have always felt that exams are fundamentally flawed in their premise. They only indicate memory retention, not actual understanding of the material in most cases. I think they should test based on the ability to formulate a correct answer based on the material but not something that is directly in the book so to speak. That would show actual comprehension (yes I know in some subjects that is the case, but not most).
 
2014-03-26 08:28:22 AM
FTFA:
"I was getting 40's on every test," said Firmin. "I studied as hard as I could, did everything in my power to try."


Welcome to intro Chemistry, sweetheart. You touch on lots of difficult subjects with little to no idea of what you're doing before moving on to the next topic.

/ BS in Organic Chemistry
// There were fewer elements on the Periodic Table when I took it.
 
2014-03-26 08:29:26 AM
Yup. All the focus on the grade, none on whether she actually learned anything useful. Students like that drive me crazy. One dropped my class because I gave him a B+ on his first paper and was absolutely unwilling to go over the paper with me to talk about what he could do next time to earn an A because "my mom liked it."

It's a product of super competitive admission to business/medicine/law (the decent schools, anyway), but students choosing their schedule solely to get the best marks are doing themselves a disservice in the long run. And admissions procedures really should encourage actual learning by dropping some of students' lowest marks. I had As in my major but took a few wacky courses outside it and got lower marks. I didn't care, but if I'd been hyper-focused on getting into med school or something I'd have had to make different choices I guess.
 
2014-03-26 08:29:52 AM

Ginnungagap42: FTFA:
"I was getting 40's on every test," said Firmin. "I studied as hard as I could, did everything in my power to try."


Welcome to intro Chemistry, sweetheart. You touch on lots of difficult subjects with little to no idea of what you're doing before moving on to the next topic.

/ BS in Organic Chemistry
// There were fewer elements on the Periodic Table when I took it.


"This was not intentional on Ms. Nguyen's part," the science chair wrote. "She was new to the introductory level."

Welcome to college.. where reading is fundamental.
 
2014-03-26 08:30:28 AM
No matter how much I try, I just can't bring myself to care about this.
 
2014-03-26 08:31:28 AM
"Advance course"? Good thing it wasn't advanced.
 
2014-03-26 08:32:24 AM
I took Intro to Astronomy because it was supposed to be fairly easy and the professor had a reputation for being entertaining and a cool dude.  I guess he retired because we got some new boring guy who wasn't very nice, and all his tests were over material that was in the book that he didn't talk about in class.  Failed the first midterm, dropped it before the deadline.  Sucks too because I was a double major and didn't have many spare credits.  That class was just for fun and I wasted it.
 
2014-03-26 08:32:45 AM
waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

Actual smart people shattered my self-delusional superiority complex!

waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!
 
2014-03-26 08:33:08 AM
FTA:

"4.0 students, we are really stressed out altogether, but this just added to it to see what I have been working for, for two years destroyed," she said.

Working towards what?  Cruising on intro courses in pursuit of an arbitrary number?

If you couldn't manage at least an honest C in general chemistry, you weren't much of a student to begin with.
 
2014-03-26 08:34:04 AM

GBB: What good is being a 4.0 student when you can't handle General Chemistry and require Intro to Chemistry to keep your grade up?


It is no good at all, but unfortunately this snowflake probably won't find this out until she hits the job market or sometime after.
 
2014-03-26 08:35:20 AM
A 4.0 from a community college? Why not just print your own degree?
 
GBB
2014-03-26 08:36:29 AM

angrycrank: but students choosing their schedule solely to get the best marks are doing themselves a disservice in the long run.


I interviewed once and the interviewer asked me about my "lower" GPA.  He asked why he should consider me over "the 4.0 waiting in the hallway".  I told him that I took tough courses because I wanted to learn things, not because I wanted to get an A.  I took advanced math and science classes.  Maybe they won't come in handy at this job, but the fact that I was eager to engage in a difficult situation should show a bit more character than someone that took easy courses to get that 4.0.

He said he would rather have someone that took the hard courses AND got the 4.0.

I simply replied, if those people applied here, you wouldn't be interviewing me.
 
2014-03-26 08:37:48 AM

GBB: What good is being a 4.0 student when you can't handle General Chemistry and require Intro to Chemistry to keep your grade up?


This. Now every potential employer googling this girl will know that she's a dim bulb and her degree is bullshiat.

General Chemistry is not an "advanced" course. It's what you should be taking and able to handle if you fancy yourself college material. Taking intro courses to keep your precious 4.0 GPA is pathetic.
 
2014-03-26 08:39:46 AM

GBB: I interviewed once and the interviewer asked me about my "lower" GPA. He asked why he should consider me over "the 4.0 waiting in the hallway". I told him that I took tough courses because I wanted to learn things, not because I wanted to get an A. I took advanced math and science classes. Maybe they won't come in handy at this job, but the fact that I was eager to engage in a difficult situation should show a bit more character than someone that took easy courses to get that 4.0.

He said he would rather have someone that took the hard courses AND got the 4.0.

I simply replied, if those people applied here, you wouldn't be interviewing me.


Sweet Jesus, I hope your story is true, because I love it.  Good for you.
 
2014-03-26 08:42:15 AM
I'm confused.  Every class I took without exception, students were given a syllabus the first day of class that contained, among other things,  THE TITLE OF THE COURSE.
 
2014-03-26 08:43:03 AM

ArgusRun: Nobody of any importance cares about the difference between a 3.9 and a 4.0.


The class the student intended to take was Chemistry for Retards, but she was actually taught Chemistry I.  Considering this was a junior college in Texas, it was likely taught at a high school level.  This is a student who selected her courses precisely with the intent to get an A in every class.  Is it "advanced-level" Chemistry?  No, it's just advanced compared to the alternative.  I went to a private college that did the same thing, except it was test-based.  (First day of class you took a test.  The test was not part of your grade, but it determined which class you were going to be in).  I tested out of the class with AP credit, but still had to take the lab (huge pain to take a lab without the context of instruction.  I just had to guess what concept was being taught, and adapt to differing terminology by assumption.)
 
2014-03-26 08:48:08 AM

GDubDub: I'm confused.  Every class I took without exception, students were given a syllabus the first day of class that contained, among other things,  THE TITLE OF THE COURSE.


The mistake is that the new instructor had no idea she'd be teaching at the high school level at best, rather than the college level which should have been. Now that she knows how low to keep the bar, she'll either resign herself to reality or move on.
 
2014-03-26 08:50:15 AM

ArgusRun: Nobody of any importance cares about the difference between a 3.9 and a 4.0.


I don't know her situation but if you're a working schlub who is leaning on grants and scholarships pretty heavy, that 4.0 can go a long way towards getting the bills paid and staying out of debt.
 
2014-03-26 08:50:21 AM
When I was in college, at the start of the course we got thing called a syllabus that usually stated what course we were in, what would be taught, what was expected of us, and often what we should already know (prerequisites).
 
2014-03-26 08:52:48 AM
Sounds like the poor kid actually learned something.

O the huge manatee!
 
2014-03-26 08:54:21 AM
I took AP chemistry as a senior in high school  - a class that was designed to be at the level of Chem 1515 at the local U, required for my track.  With that on my transcript, my Uni adviser said sure, you can skip straight to Chem 3015, organic chemistry.

Gaahhhh!
 
2014-03-26 08:55:43 AM

DoBeDoBeDo: Wait she had an F up to the final exam?   Why wouldn't she drop the class WAY before that?


This: what a dummy when not quitting as soon as she saw what the course really was
 
2014-03-26 08:55:51 AM

Lydia_C: GDubDub: I'm confused.  Every class I took without exception, students were given a syllabus the first day of class that contained, among other things,  THE TITLE OF THE COURSE.

The mistake is that the new instructor had no idea she'd be teaching at the high school level at best, rather than the college level which should have been. Now that she knows how low to keep the bar, she'll either resign herself to reality or move on.


That's my thought too. Although chemistry is hard if you don't have a great memory.

/Switched from chem engineering to mech engineering
 
2014-03-26 08:57:31 AM

Nemosomen: ArgusRun: Nobody of any importance cares about the difference between a 3.9 and a 4.0.

The class the student intended to take was Chemistry for Retards, but she was actually taught Chemistry I.  Considering this was a junior college in Texas, it was likely taught at a high school level.  This is a student who selected her courses precisely with the intent to get an A in every class.  Is it "advanced-level" Chemistry?  No, it's just advanced compared to the alternative.  I went to a private college that did the same thing, except it was test-based.  (First day of class you took a test.  The test was not part of your grade, but it determined which class you were going to be in).  I tested out of the class with AP credit, but still had to take the lab (huge pain to take a lab without the context of instruction.  I just had to guess what concept was being taught, and adapt to differing terminology by assumption.)


I presume this was the freshman-level course we used to refer to fondly as "Kitchen Chemistry".

/ still had a tough time passing it. Boring and taught boringly.
 
2014-03-26 08:57:37 AM

SansNeural: I took AP chemistry as a senior in high school  - a class that was designed to be at the level of Chem 1515 at the local U, required for my track.  With that on my transcript, my Uni adviser said sure, you can skip straight to Chem 3015, organic chemistry.

Gaahhhh!


I find organic chemistry easier to wrap my head around than inorganic. To me it just feels less.....abstract, I guess.
 
2014-03-26 09:01:31 AM
The same thing happened to me. I took Matrix Algebra with the hope of taking the blue pill course (x + y =y0 Because y0 (y naught)) . I got the red pill instead (iambic quadratic equations). I guess I should have told the teacher that I was color blind. And as a liberal arts major, I was promised little to no math.
 
2014-03-26 09:07:38 AM
It's already been covered in this thread but if you're a 4.0 student and you can't handle Chem 101 then you aren't really a 4.0 student... hell you might not actually be a 3.0 student.

I had a HS teacher with a pretty heavy foreign accent for Chemistry and we spent a lot of time screwing arouind.  Two years later I basically stopped going to my Chem 101,102 and 103 lectures because it seemed like Chem for morons (even tho it was probably appropriately leveled for a general chem class with 300+ students in the lecture hall).

Gen chem at a community college has got to be 1st semester high school chem all over again.
 
2014-03-26 09:09:27 AM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: I find organic chemistry easier to wrap my head around than inorganic. To me it just feels less.....abstract


I had the exact opposite experience.

upload.wikimedia.org

/ balls, balls and more balls!
 
2014-03-26 09:10:10 AM
For college students, a straight-A average is a crucial building block on the road to success

LOL WUT?

3.6 undergrad, here. Currently enrolled at my top choice for grad school in a competitive program. Perhaps it helped that I submitted a statement of purpose that said something besides "I want to graduate with a 4.0."

Still pulling about a B+ total and I feel pretty good about my academic success.
 
2014-03-26 09:13:18 AM

Vampirococcus rocks: A 1000 level class is not "advanced".  Lone Star College looks like a Junior College.  The student is snow flakey.  So much whining.

That is all.


Exactly-- general chemistry?  That's not advanced.  "I studied so hard and learned so much chemistry and got a B-- something I never thought I could do-- but instead of being proud of myself and inspired to expect more of my abilities I am now very unhappy???"
 
2014-03-26 09:16:38 AM

GBB: angrycrank: but students choosing their schedule solely to get the best marks are doing themselves a disservice in the long run.

I interviewed once and the interviewer asked me about my "lower" GPA.  He asked why he should consider me over "the 4.0 waiting in the hallway".  I told him that I took tough courses because I wanted to learn things, not because I wanted to get an A.  I took advanced math and science classes.  Maybe they won't come in handy at this job, but the fact that I was eager to engage in a difficult situation should show a bit more character than someone that took easy courses to get that 4.0.

He said he would rather have someone that took the hard courses AND got the 4.0.

I simply replied, if those people applied here, you wouldn't be interviewing me.


so-- what happened?  Did you get the job?
 
2014-03-26 09:16:50 AM

Polyhazard: For college students, a straight-A average is a crucial building block on the road to success

LOL WUT?

3.6 undergrad, here. Currently enrolled at my top choice for grad school in a competitive program. Perhaps it helped that I submitted a statement of purpose that said something besides "I want to graduate with a 4.0."

Still pulling about a B+ total and I feel pretty good about my academic success.


2.6 here and working at a job I like with loads of potential.  The catch is that I went to a school that excelled at my program and actually required work to get bare minimum grades.
 
2014-03-26 09:17:41 AM

TomD9938: Louisiana_Sitar_Club: I find organic chemistry easier to wrap my head around than inorganic. To me it just feels less.....abstract

I had the exact opposite experience.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 220x301]

/ balls, balls and more balls!


Perhaps I've learned something about myself today.
 
2014-03-26 09:20:38 AM
It doesn't say so in TFA, but for those of you who are all "OMFG WHINY SNOWFLAKE! WHO CARES ABOUT A 4.0 in COMMUNITY COLLEGE", consider this:

Some community colleges have what's called "tuition remission", where if you prove that you can maintain a 4.0 through a full load for the previous term, your following term's entire tuition (less lab fees, books, etc.) is completely waived. It was the only way I was able to afford community college.

I'm not sure what the percentage of students overall take advantage of such a policy, or even if it's available at this particular college, but maybe this is why the student is bent out of shape. The policy states that anything less than a 4.0 will mean that the next term is not eligible for tuition remission.

The policy at the community college I went to didn't use the cumulative GPA; it only cared about the previous term stats, so you could technically have less than a 4.0 GPA overall and still qualify for tuition remission in later terms if you met the criteria. However, you couldn't withdraw from a course during the term if it dropped you below the credit hours needed to maintain full-time status (e.g. 12 semester hours at my college). That might explain why the student(s) didn't withdraw from the class when they were getting F's: too late to register for another class in that term by that time.

Had I ever not gotten an A in my community college career, I would have been really pissed off at myself, not only because next term was on me, but also because I'd have known that the A was there for me to attain and I didn't. Maybe that's why this student is pissed, especially when you get a blatant admission from the instructor directly to the class, on the last week of class. (Then again, if it's just because "o noes! I doesn't has 4.0 and now my goal of being a rocket surgeon is dead!", I really don't have much sympathy.)

I'm not buying their "we're not going to investigate" line, either. If they want to stay regionally accredited, you can bet that they'll have some internal audit (or maybe even an external one, depending on how concerned SACS is about this story; the regional accrediting agencies HATE hearing stories like this).

/maybe I'm overthinking this
//I know, tl;dr
 
2014-03-26 09:25:07 AM

lesliepop: GBB: angrycrank: but students choosing their schedule solely to get the best marks are doing themselves a disservice in the long run.

I interviewed once and the interviewer asked me about my "lower" GPA.  He asked why he should consider me over "the 4.0 waiting in the hallway".  I told him that I took tough courses because I wanted to learn things, not because I wanted to get an A.  I took advanced math and science classes.  Maybe they won't come in handy at this job, but the fact that I was eager to engage in a difficult situation should show a bit more character than someone that took easy courses to get that 4.0.

He said he would rather have someone that took the hard courses AND got the 4.0.

I simply replied, if those people applied here, you wouldn't be interviewing me.

so-- what happened?  Did you get the job?


I have not been asked my GPA since I was 21.  I think I would have got up and left the interview.  Who gives a crap about GPA once you earn the degree?  Unless you are talking Ivy-League Degree and the interviewer is from the same school...then the nepotism alone should get you in.  Isn't that why you go to Harvard/Yale?
 
2014-03-26 09:28:21 AM
Only one man would dare give me the raspberry.
 
2014-03-26 09:29:53 AM
teylix:

That's my thought too. Although chemistry is hard if you don't have a great memory.

/Switched from chem engineering to mech engineering


And there went my productivity for the day. Knowing someone out there is engineering Mechs and I'm just sitting here... well you know what.
 
2014-03-26 09:33:13 AM

ZombieBear: teylix:

That's my thought too. Although chemistry is hard if you don't have a great memory.

/Switched from chem engineering to mech engineering

And there went my productivity for the day. Knowing someone out there is engineering Mechs and I'm just sitting here... well you know what.


Masturbating?
 
2014-03-26 09:34:59 AM
Having just finished something like my 20th year of graduation admissions, I can tell little Miss Sparkles that a 4.0 won't get you squat.  Yes we look at GPA, but really anything over a 3.5 is fine as far as it goes. Past a decent looking GPA selection committees tend to look far more closely at the relevant courses you took and how well you did on them. Beyond that GRE scores matter a bunch (probably too much, but that's life) along with reference letters and the cover letter (oh the cliches! they make your eyes bleed). I'm not necessarily excusing the school but something tells me this student won't do too great on these other criteria. But she'll have a 3.9x which is nice. It'll give her a story to tell later about the injustice of it all. Everyone who's ever gone to college has at least one of them.
 
2014-03-26 09:36:21 AM
Having difficulty maintaining a 4.0? Welcome to the concept of college.

But as for this jr college crap, I got my degree at a real school and was trying to get some health care oriented prerequisites--the community college admins made a big ass deal about testing out of prerequisites or doling over the cash and time to take them before I could take the real classes I needed. I still refuse to retake their bio 101 series (for which, the equivalent prerequisite is any farking high school bio). They made me jump through hoops to get into their chem 101 and demanded I take a farking algebra test to get into it even though I had calculus and organic chem under my belt. *shakes head* Easiest class of my life. It was easier than my high school chemistry class, because my high school teacher was actually engaging and didnt test on rote memorization.

/sorry for the rant
//hates community college courses
///misses real college where all you need is a teacher ok to taked a class then you are on your own, damned o-chem
 
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