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(International Business Times)   In loving memory of Yellowstone Supervolcano. 2.1 million years BC - 2014. You destroyed Earth like no other. RIP   (ibtimes.co.uk) divider line 131
    More: Hero, Yellowstone, Earth, University of Wyoming, Mammoth Hot Springs  
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20216 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Mar 2014 at 1:01 PM (48 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



131 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-25 11:33:16 AM  
TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?
 
2014-03-25 11:41:30 AM  

JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?


It's gonna blow, but not with the same vigor as in it's youth.  Thankfully they don't make volcano viagra.
 
2014-03-25 11:41:33 AM  

JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?


It's dying, but it's going to try and take us with it first.

Think "Predator".

www.therobotspajamas.com
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-25 11:44:52 AM  
If it becomes an extinct volcano, it will never erupt again.

Seems backwards to me. If it never erupts again, then it is extinct.
 
2014-03-25 11:58:38 AM  
Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!
 
2014-03-25 12:02:12 PM  
I can't make any decisions on this until I hear what Bobby Jindall thinks.
 
2014-03-25 12:16:52 PM  
Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.
 
2014-03-25 12:22:23 PM  
Well, sh*t.  There goes my entry in the office End of The World Scenario pool.
 
2014-03-25 12:26:38 PM  

reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!


2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?
 
2014-03-25 12:35:54 PM  
Whoever wrote that needs an editor that's not smoking a bong.
 
2014-03-25 12:39:02 PM  
If only autoplay video could join it in death.
 
2014-03-25 12:43:16 PM  

Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.


ALOT!

I remember it blowing, I was in Portland at the time.
 
2014-03-25 12:54:49 PM  
The Grand Prismatic Spring, the largest in the United States and third largest in the world, is seen in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

The Grand Prismatic Spring is the 3rd largest Grand Prismatic Spring in the world.  I wonder how many debris that is?
 
2014-03-25 01:05:49 PM  

ZAZ: If it becomes an extinct volcano, it will never erupt again.

Seems backwards to me. If it never erupts again, then it is extinct.


It's going to do a soliloquy before jumping off a bridge.
 
2014-03-25 01:06:39 PM  

Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.


img4.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-03-25 01:06:42 PM  
watch it go off tomorrow

thanks for jinxing us!
 
2014-03-25 01:07:13 PM  

ZAZ: If it becomes an extinct volcano, it will never erupt again.

Seems backwards to me. If it never erupts again, then it is extinct.


If that was the definition, we couldn't label any volcano as extinct until the end of time.
 
2014-03-25 01:08:50 PM  
I thought it was "Jellystone".

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-03-25 01:09:16 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


2000 Rhode Islands of debris.  That is a LOT.

How many more debris can the earth take?
 
2014-03-25 01:09:49 PM  

JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?


It could explode next Tuesday, give or take 70,000 years.
 
2014-03-25 01:10:02 PM  
Could we sacrifice Beiber into the volcano so as to appease the vulcanic gods of the underworld?  Just to be sure?
 
2014-03-25 01:10:52 PM  
wtf is a deathbead?
 
2014-03-25 01:11:06 PM  

vonmatrices: Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.

[img4.wikia.nocookie.net image 640x480]


Glad to see this is covered.
 
2014-03-25 01:11:12 PM  

JoieD'Zen: I can't make any decisions on this until I hear what Bobby Jindall Al Gore and/or ManBearPig thinks.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-03-25 01:11:16 PM  

Superjew: ZAZ: If it becomes an extinct volcano, it will never erupt again.

Seems backwards to me. If it never erupts again, then it is extinct.

If that was the definition, we couldn't label any volcano as extinct until the end of time.


That's kind of the problem of trying to invent classifications for things that we have no control over.  The best you can say is that if it appears that a volcano is no longer capable of erupting, it is extinct; since, clearly, declaring a volcano as being extinct does not prevent it from ever erupting again.  We humans are simply observing and classifying the best we know how, given our present knowledge of how things work.
 
2014-03-25 01:12:37 PM  
Don't taunt the dynamite volcano. Just don't do it.
 
2014-03-25 01:13:18 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


I lived 300 miles downwind of St Helens when it blew. Town got a couple of inches of ash.

Hate to think that translates to 4000 inches of ash

/csb
// don't know how much debris
 
2014-03-25 01:13:34 PM  
Inconsolable:


adamcarolla.com
 
2014-03-25 01:13:42 PM  
Oh great, now we have to find a different way to kill Woody Harrelson!
 
2014-03-25 01:14:12 PM  
Man, I hate IBT links. They are just as good at journalism as you would expect from a company whose chief content manager is a software engineer. They use unpaid Olivet University students as editors and reporters. Thus, this sort of incomprehensible word salad where the headline doesn't match the story.
 
2014-03-25 01:15:20 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


Rhode Islands. The unit of measure for large terrestrial comparisons is always Rhode Island.
 
2014-03-25 01:15:33 PM  
"Yellowstone will likely be a good place to grow potatoes one day."

All is not lost!
 
2014-03-25 01:15:43 PM  
TL;DR = "We don't have any idea what this volcano will do."
 
2014-03-25 01:16:54 PM  
Guess my procrastination, lack of planning for the future, and just being a goof off was the proper life plan.
Who's laughing now, suckers.
 
2014-03-25 01:16:58 PM  

meat0918: JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?

It could explode next Tuesday, give or take 70,000 years.


Btw, TFA is off by an order of magnitude here. Yellowstone last erupted 640,000 years ago. That's an extra zero in there.

The bong-smoking editor decided to uniformly clip a zero off the correct ballpark number. Probably had his mind blown thinking about the vastness of time.

/whoa
 
2014-03-25 01:17:09 PM  

JohnCarter: Could we sacrifice Beiber into the volcano so as to appease the vulcanic gods of the underworld?  Just to be sure?


Pretty sure Hephaestus would consider that an insult and proceed to fry us all.
 
2014-03-25 01:17:50 PM  
Lot's of DeBarges
s.pixogs.com
 
2014-03-25 01:19:06 PM  

Detinwolf: gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?

2000 Rhode Islands of debris.  That is a LOT.

How many more debris can the earth take?


2000 IS a lot of debris!
 
2014-03-25 01:19:43 PM  
Can a conservatard please explain how this now means we don't need to worry about greenhouse gas?
 
2014-03-25 01:20:10 PM  

Lydia_C: meat0918: JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?

It could explode next Tuesday, give or take 70,000 years.

Btw, TFA is off by an order of magnitude here. Yellowstone last erupted 640,000 years ago. That's an extra zero in there.

The bong-smoking editor decided to uniformly clip a zero off the correct ballpark number. Probably had his mind blown thinking about the vastness of time.

/whoa


Ok, next Tuesday, give or take 640,000 years.
 
2014-03-25 01:20:25 PM  
Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?
 
2014-03-25 01:20:35 PM  
They were off a bit on the frequency of the eruptions too. It goes up about every 700,000 years, not 70,000
 
2014-03-25 01:21:26 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


Adeles.
 
2014-03-25 01:21:51 PM  
Hah! That's just what the trilobites said. Ask one now what they think. Just ask one now.
 
2014-03-25 01:22:15 PM  

roddack: "Yellowstone will likely be a good place to grow potatoes one day."

All is not lost!


"Here come the Irish!"
 
2014-03-25 01:24:01 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?


I want to say that the North American plate is moving west to southwest. So, look out Fargo?
 
2014-03-25 01:24:38 PM  

JohnCarter: Could we sacrifice Beiber into the volcano so as to appease the vulcanic gods of the underworld?  Just to be sure?


That would almost guarantee an eruption. It would be viewed as an insult.
 
2014-03-25 01:25:07 PM  
"In loving memory?!!?!?" Lest we forget this volcano killed Woody Harrelson? Sociopaths.
 
2014-03-25 01:26:02 PM  
I like the expanded access to information that the internet gives me, but the lack of editors in general these days is jarring.  Sooooo many articles who's only editing is a pass through spell check, if that.
 
2014-03-25 01:27:46 PM  
Well, the way these things work, the hotspot under the crust that fuels Yellowstone will just shift a hundred miles east and create a new megavolcano complex in a few hundred thousand years.
 
2014-03-25 01:28:09 PM  
Dying =/= Dead...

AND...there's not reason to assume it will die peacefully.

lindsayrgwatt.com
 
2014-03-25 01:29:16 PM  
unpossible... something something only 6000 years old something something.
 
2014-03-25 01:29:33 PM  
Of course the IBT has to misconstrue the science so that fracking in the region can go on unabated. Meanwhile, those who actually monitor the volcano have noted an uptick in seismic activity over the last ten years and the lava dome under it has been swelling and moving closer to the surface. This indicates that the volcano is becoming more active and could erupt. When? No one can say. But it will erupt again one day. It isn't becoming extinct anytime soon.
 
2014-03-25 01:32:20 PM  
It's not dead... *sniff* It's a strong super-volcano! It wants to live! Now quickly, start fracking here, here, and here! Live, damn it... LIVE!!! Show us many debris!!! We know you can do it!!!
 
2014-03-25 01:33:11 PM  
It's because of the brain-cloud, isn't it?
 
2014-03-25 01:33:38 PM  

JoieD'Zen: Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.

ALOT!

I remember it blowing, I was in Portland at the time.


I was at the Johnston Observatory a few years back.  It's a sobering, amazing place.

I was completely awed by the size of the trees that are uniformly sheared off.  This landscape goes for miles:
ec.pond5.com
 
2014-03-25 01:34:54 PM  

whistleridge: gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?

Rhode Islands. The unit of measure for large terrestrial comparisons is always Rhode Island.


We're talkung about debris, doesn't that usually get converted into New Jerseys?
 
2014-03-25 01:40:12 PM  

menschenfresser: Wellon Dowd: Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?

I want to say that the North American plate is moving west to southwest. So, look out Fargo?


You can follow the path of the Yellowstone Caldera as it moved over time, through southern Oregon and Idaho.   Lots of old lava beds, extinct volcanoes, The Caldera is stationary and the plate moves past it.
 
2014-03-25 01:41:27 PM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: I like the expanded access to information that the internet gives me, but the lack of editors in general these days is jarring.  Sooooo many articles who's only editing is a pass through spell check, if that.


I like the expanded access to information that the internet gives me; but, the lack of editors in general these days is jarring.  So many articles whose only editing is a pass through spell check, if that.

FTFY
 
2014-03-25 01:43:01 PM  

Lydia_C: meat0918: JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?

It could explode next Tuesday, give or take 70,000 years.

Btw, TFA is off by an order of magnitude here. Yellowstone last erupted 640,000 years ago. That's an extra zero in there.

The bong-smoking editor decided to uniformly clip a zero off the correct ballpark number. Probably had his mind blown thinking about the vastness of time.

/whoa


The whole damn article is a masterpiece of editorial/ authorial stupidity.
 
2014-03-25 01:49:51 PM  

EdNortonsTwin: Can a conservatard please explain how this now means we don't need to worry about greenhouse gas?


Pffft.  Global warming.  Something something libtard something something Obamaphone something something welfare queens.
 
2014-03-25 01:50:13 PM  

Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.


Bill Bryson put it best:

"Imagine a pile of TNT about the size of an English county and reaching 13 kilometers into the sky, to about the height of the highest cirrus clouds, and you have some idea of what visitors to Yellowstone are shuffling around on top of."

from A Short History of Nearly Everything.

Terrific book btw, for more than just supervolcanoes.
 
2014-03-25 01:51:21 PM  
another, more telling pic:
inapcache.boston.com
 
2014-03-25 01:51:28 PM  

Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: I like the expanded access to information that the internet gives me, but the lack of editors in general these days is jarring.  Sooooo many articles who's whose only editing is a pass through spell check, if that.


Glass houses, throwing stones, etc.  And anyway, "who" (or who's or whose, for that matter) should only be used in reference to persons, not in reference to inanimate objects (in this case, "articles").
 
2014-03-25 01:53:21 PM  
Copyediting is also, apparently, on its molten deathbead.

/morans
 
2014-03-25 01:54:35 PM  

Wellon Dowd: Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?


Find Yellowstone on Google Maps. Switch to satellite view. Zoom up until you can see all the Rockies. You'll see the path to the SW, then curving to NW. Just follow the Snake River.

That implies that the hot spot is moving toward the NE, relative to the plate.
 
2014-03-25 01:55:58 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


I see I'm not the only one that caught that.
 
2014-03-25 01:58:10 PM  
FTFA: "It looks like it's boiling. But it is actually from steam or CO2."

Looks like everyone jumped on the debris bandwagon and missed this gem.
 
2014-03-25 01:58:42 PM  
mainsite.dancemania.netdna-cdn.com
 
2014-03-25 01:59:34 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-25 01:59:47 PM  

JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?


I would also like to know if it's Volcano Warming or Volcano Cooling. C'mon scienticians, make up your mind.
 
2014-03-25 02:00:51 PM  

whistleridge: gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?

Rhode Islands. The unit of measure for large terrestrial comparisons is always Rhode Island.


Debris. It says it in the article. 2000 MORE DEBRIS than before.
 
2014-03-25 02:01:09 PM  

RaiderFanMikeP: watch it go off tomorrow

thanks for jinxing us!


Yeah, this'll seem pretty funny if somebody uncovers a copy of this article from some town that gets Pompeii'd.
 
2014-03-25 02:01:13 PM  

Lydia_C: meat0918: JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?

It could explode next Tuesday, give or take 70,000 years.

Btw, TFA is off by an order of magnitude here. Yellowstone last erupted 640,000 years ago. That's an extra zero in there.

The bong-smoking editor decided to uniformly clip a zero off the correct ballpark number. Probably had his mind blown thinking about the vastness of time.

/whoa


Actually it's not off at all.  The last major eruption happened 640,000 years ago, but Yellowstone has smaller eruptions much more frequently.  The most recent was indeed 70,000 years ago.  That one was more a matter of some lava bubbling to the surface rather then anything particularly apocalyptic, but it still qualifies as an eruption.

Anyways, Yellowstone becoming extinct might actually be a bad thing in the long run.  What it essentially means is that the crust has shifted far enough since it's original formation that it's essentially being cut off from it's heat source.  A new super-volcano could form further to the east, which would be closer to major population centers and where we aren't as prepared to deal with it.
 
2014-03-25 02:04:52 PM  

reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!


only 2,000 more so not that much

/apparently the first thing we did was kill all the copy editors
 
das
2014-03-25 02:08:21 PM  

unlikely: whistleridge: gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?

Rhode Islands. The unit of measure for large terrestrial comparisons is always Rhode Island.

Debris. It says it in the article. 2000 MORE DEBRIS than before.


Is that like a brazillion???
 
2014-03-25 02:13:19 PM  

MooseBayou: JoieD'Zen: Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.

ALOT!

I remember it blowing, I was in Portland at the time.

I was at the Johnston Observatory a few years back.  It's a sobering, amazing place.

I was completely awed by the size of the trees that are uniformly sheared off.  This landscape goes for miles:
[ec.pond5.com image 850x478]


I've been up there, beautiful pic.
I feel that Rainier will blow before Yellowstone but hopefully I am wrong. Rainier will cause more death and destruction due to it's location.
 
2014-03-25 02:13:34 PM  
images.ghostbusters.net

"Is it too warm in here for debris?"
 
2014-03-25 02:13:44 PM  
so if one debris = one cat, and one intertube = a brazillian cats, then it really is a series of tubes in which we can fit 2000 brazillian debreeses with room for six cats?  And if so, whar is the caldera that obviously ate the plane while dog?
 
2014-03-25 02:14:10 PM  

Carousel Beast: FTFA: "It looks like it's boiling. But it is actually from steam or CO2."

Looks like everyone jumped on the debris bandwagon and missed this gem.


what can I say we like counting units

/I said Unit hehehe...
 
2014-03-25 02:16:39 PM  

Ambivalence: JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?

It's gonna blow, but not with the same vigor as in it's youth.  Thankfully they don't make volcano viagra.


Hmm, something to think about.
img.fark.net

Too obscure?
 
2014-03-25 02:17:02 PM  

Carousel Beast: FTFA: "It looks like it's boiling. But it is actually from steam or CO2."

Looks like everyone jumped on the debris bandwagon and missed this gem.


I suspect he may mean that the water itself on the surface isn't boiling: The steam is coming from somewher emuch, much deeper, and then bubbling to the surface.
 
2014-03-25 02:19:20 PM  

MooseBayou: another, more telling pic:
[inapcache.boston.com image 850x589]


So I realize that I am totally ignorant on the subject, but could we not be using all those trees for lumber rather than killing live trees?  Is the wood bad or what?
 
2014-03-25 02:20:44 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: I thought it was "Jellystone".

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 399x300]


Looks like Escher drew that!
 
2014-03-25 02:22:22 PM  
If you are seeing smaller measurements in the indicators that you use for standard volcanoes it may indicate change, but not one that you can interpret the same way.  This is no ordinary volcano.  This is a plume from the earth's mantle burning holes in the tectonic plate.  If it goes quiet it most likely means that pressure is building at a level you are unequipped to measure, not that the force that created mass extinction events has suddenly gone quiet.

But, people gotta publish papers...
 
2014-03-25 02:22:23 PM  

Nightjars: Superjew: ZAZ: If it becomes an extinct volcano, it will never erupt again.

Seems backwards to me. If it never erupts again, then it is extinct.

If that was the definition, we couldn't label any volcano as extinct until the end of time.

That's kind of the problem of trying to invent classifications for things that we have no control over.  The best you can say is that if it appears that a volcano is no longer capable of erupting, it is extinct; since, clearly, declaring a volcano as being extinct does not prevent it from ever erupting again.  We humans are simply observing and classifying the best we know how, given our present knowledge of how things work.


It's almost like we make shiat up as we go along.
 
2014-03-25 02:24:02 PM  

menschenfresser: Wellon Dowd: Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?

I want to say that the North American plate is moving west to southwest. So, look out Fargo?


Based on this map, it looks like Billings, Montana.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-03-25 02:24:45 PM  

Non-evil Monkey: Lydia_C: meat0918: JoieD'Zen: TFA  says it's dying and it's going to blow - which is it?

It could explode next Tuesday, give or take 70,000 years.

Btw, TFA is off by an order of magnitude here. Yellowstone last erupted 640,000 years ago. That's an extra zero in there.

The bong-smoking editor decided to uniformly clip a zero off the correct ballpark number. Probably had his mind blown thinking about the vastness of time.

/whoa

Actually it's not off at all.  The last major eruption happened 640,000 years ago, but Yellowstone has smaller eruptions much more frequently.  The most recent was indeed 70,000 years ago.  That one was more a matter of some lava bubbling to the surface rather then anything particularly apocalyptic, but it still qualifies as an eruption.

Anyways, Yellowstone becoming extinct might actually be a bad thing in the long run.  What it essentially means is that the crust has shifted far enough since it's original formation that it's essentially being cut off from it's heat source.  A new super-volcano could form further to the east, which would be closer to major population centers and where we aren't as prepared to deal with it.


The "dying down" part the article could be that the vents are clogging up and we could have an eruption on its way. Probably not the next VEI 8 eruption, but a smaller one.
 
2014-03-25 02:27:17 PM  
Everything I know about Yellowstone, I read in A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson.  I cite this as an excellent example because his research was top-notch for that book.  This, in short, is what he says...

Yellowstone explodes spectacularly roughly every 650,000 years.  The last time this happened, was a little over 650,000 years ago.  So it's probably due.  To that end, he went and spoke with one of the park geologists.  His take on the matter was, "most of the warning signs of an eruption already exist to some extent at Yellowstone.  Although right now, it appears to be releasing it's volitiles."  But even he couldn't say that it wouldn't simply explode tomorrow.  "Volcanoes are strange things.  We really don't understand them at all."

And if that thing decided to blow up as it had in the past, it would seriously wreck the entire biosphere of the planet for many thousands of years.
 
2014-03-25 02:34:45 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


Rhode Islands, that is the standard unit of measurement.
 
2014-03-25 02:37:37 PM  

menschenfresser: Wellon Dowd: Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?

I want to say that the North American plate is moving west to southwest. So, look out Fargo?


I don't think it moves that fast, more like Billings MT Has a real bad day in it's future.
 
2014-03-25 02:37:49 PM  

crzybtch: MooseBayou: another, more telling pic:
[inapcache.boston.com image 850x589]

So I realize that I am totally ignorant on the subject, but could we not be using all those trees for lumber rather than killing live trees?  Is the wood bad or what?


I don't know.  It might be a difficult place to get the harvesting machinery into.  These are NOT small trees, either.  They're big ol' Pacific firs and spruces.

The pictures just make them look like matchsticks.

I highly recommend a trip there.  Go to the Ape Caves and the Climber's Bivouac, too.  You will see moose.  No bayou.
 
2014-03-25 02:43:08 PM  
Well THANKS!  Now they've all but guaranteed it'll blow.
 
2014-03-25 02:44:14 PM  
It's dying. That's why the ground west of Yellowstone Lake has risen ten inches. Riiight.
 
2014-03-25 02:45:58 PM  

crzybtch: MooseBayou: another, more telling pic:
[inapcache.boston.com image 850x589]

So I realize that I am totally ignorant on the subject, but could we not be using all those trees for lumber rather than killing live trees?  Is the wood bad or what?


It's a National Forest, plus a giant research area to see exactly what happens after such a cataclysmic event.
 
2014-03-25 02:47:37 PM  

schnee: I lived 300 miles downwind of St Helens when it blew. Town got a couple of inches of ash.

Hate to think that translates to 4000 inches of ash

/csb
// don't know how much debris


Don't worry. If you live 300 miles away from the Yellowstone supervolcano when it erupts, the ash will be the least of your problems. Or, possibly, the last.
 
2014-03-25 02:48:23 PM  
Harry Turtledove said to be despondent upon hearing the news.
 
2014-03-25 02:50:54 PM  

Alfunk: menschenfresser: Wellon Dowd: Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?

I want to say that the North American plate is moving west to southwest. So, look out Fargo?

I don't think it moves that fast, more like Billings MT Has a real bad day in it's future.


That's too bad. Fargo needs to be boiled away in a lake of lava.
 
2014-03-25 02:51:48 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: I thought it was "Jellystone".

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 399x300]


That's some terrible perspective on that sign lol
 
2014-03-25 02:51:58 PM  

menschenfresser: Alfunk: menschenfresser: Wellon Dowd: Yellowstone is the most recent system along the hot spot. There are older volcanic systems that march their way up the plains, and as they got older and older, all of those systems eventually cooled. The ground subsided, and Hawaiian-type lava covered them up.

So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?

I want to say that the North American plate is moving west to southwest. So, look out Fargo?

I don't think it moves that fast, more like Billings MT Has a real bad day in it's future.

That's too bad. Fargo needs to be boiled away in a lake of lava.


Love ya Margie
 
2014-03-25 02:56:05 PM  

EdNortonsTwin: Can a conservatard please explain how this now means we don't need to worry about greenhouse gas?


Certainly.

Jesus.

You're welcome.
 
2014-03-25 02:56:47 PM  

Unoriginal_Username: JohnCarter: Could we sacrifice Beiber into the volcano so as to appease the vulcanic gods of the underworld?  Just to be sure?

That would almost guarantee an eruption. It would be viewed as an insult.


You're right. Let's just shoot him.
 
2014-03-25 02:59:08 PM  

das: unlikely: whistleridge: gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?

Rhode Islands. The unit of measure for large terrestrial comparisons is always Rhode Island.

Debris. It says it in the article. 2000 MORE DEBRIS than before.

Is that like a brazillion???


I just want to know if the singular is "debrum" or "debri"
 
2014-03-25 03:00:43 PM  

INeedAName: Sin_City_Superhero: I thought it was "Jellystone".

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 399x300]

Looks like Escher drew that!


I'm glad I'm not the only one whose eyes went all @_@   upon beholding that oh-so-skillful rendering.
 
2014-03-25 03:06:17 PM  

Wellon Dowd: So which way is the plate moving over the hot spot? Are Denver or Cheyenne next?


An essay I read by an actual geologist postulated that,

a. It's well to the north of Denver moving east. So Denver isn't on it's menu.
b. Probably done at this location based on the other calderas it's left behind. Each of them erupted a couple of times over a few million years. Yellowstone, is about the age where activity stops based on that.
c. The next potential location is under a thicker layer of crust that it probably can't punch through.
d. He'll be long dead and forgotten before anyone finds out if he's right.
 
2014-03-25 03:11:49 PM  

DerAppie: We're talkung about debris, doesn't that usually get converted into New Jerseys?


That's only when comparing are. Volume is compared to swimming pools, Chrysler Buildings or Grand Canyons. For really big volumes you use subby's mom's hoo-ha.
 
2014-03-25 03:11:51 PM  
RIP in peace, jernulizum.
 
2014-03-25 03:15:44 PM  

MooseBayou: JoieD'Zen: Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.

ALOT!

I remember it blowing, I was in Portland at the time.

I was at the Johnston Observatory a few years back.  It's a sobering, amazing place.

I was completely awed by the size of the trees that are uniformly sheared off.  This landscape goes for miles:
[ec.pond5.com image 850x478]


Doesn't all that wood have value beyond just letting it lay there?
 
2014-03-25 03:29:48 PM  

Pangea: MooseBayou: JoieD'Zen: Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.

ALOT!

I remember it blowing, I was in Portland at the time.

I was at the Johnston Observatory a few years back.  It's a sobering, amazing place.

I was completely awed by the size of the trees that are uniformly sheared off.  This landscape goes for miles:
[ec.pond5.com image 850x478]

Doesn't all that wood have value beyond just letting it lay there?


Answered above.  It's National Land.  But, don't they take timber from National Parks sometimes?  Or, do they have to sell it or lease it, like for oil drilling?
http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2013/02/logging_prop os ed_near_crater_l.html
 
2014-03-25 03:37:24 PM  
"You destroyed the Earth like no other."

Theia begs to differ:

www.nature.com
 
2014-03-25 03:46:34 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


2000 Thetans. The CoS is having difficulty recruiting new members. They need more Thetans.
 
2014-03-25 03:52:55 PM  
Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

A new eruption would blow in 3980 debris.
 
2014-03-25 04:05:52 PM  

MooseBayou: Pangea: MooseBayou: JoieD'Zen: Cyberluddite: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

I wish the article would let us know exactly how many debris Mount St. Helens sent in the air in 1980, so we would have some basis for comparison.

ALOT!

I remember it blowing, I was in Portland at the time.

I was at the Johnston Observatory a few years back.  It's a sobering, amazing place.

I was completely awed by the size of the trees that are uniformly sheared off.  This landscape goes for miles:
[ec.pond5.com image 850x478]

Doesn't all that wood have value beyond just letting it lay there?

Answered above.  It's National Land.  But, don't they take timber from National Parks sometimes?  Or, do they have to sell it or lease it, like for oil drilling?
http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2013/02/logging_prop os ed_near_crater_l.html


Seems like an enormous fire is virtually guaranteed if they wait long enough. Nothing can grow to consume the dead logs.
 
2014-03-25 04:08:57 PM  

saturn badger: gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?

2000 Thetans. The CoS is having difficulty recruiting new members. They need more Thetans.


Now I'm imagining a RTS religion vs religion game with resources drawn from the mythology of each. And Xenu bellowing through the speakers, "You require more thetans."
 
2014-03-25 04:20:27 PM  

saturn badger: gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?

2000 Thetans. The CoS is having difficulty recruiting new members. They need more Thetans.


Xenu has foretold this.  Debris-catching machines will be launched above the volcano just like last time.  Only this time, 2000 more thetans will be caught.
 
2014-03-25 04:21:49 PM  

gopher321: reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!

2000 what? 2000 trees? 2000 1977 Ford LTDs? 2000 Harry Trumans?


2000 debris, which, of course, is 2000 times the amount of 1 debri.
 
2014-03-25 04:30:54 PM  
Crzybtch

If you are actually curious about the difference between leaving the wood lay (as the government did) and harvesting and re-planting (as Weyerhaeuser did)  then please have a look at these websites.  There are positives to both methods.

 At the end of the day though, the timber company harvested the blow down and replanted because it was in their best economic interests,  The government did nothing because the several involved agencies could not agree on what to do, so they called it a national monument and hoped that the ecology of the region would kind of take care of itself, which it kind of has.

http://www.weyerhaeuser.com/Sustainability/People/Communities/Educat io nAndOutreach/MountStHelens/NewForest

http://www.fs.usda.gov/mountsthelens
 
2014-03-25 04:31:19 PM  

crzybtch: So I realize that I am totally ignorant on the subject, but could we not be using all those trees for lumber rather than killing live trees?  Is the wood bad or what?


Most of those trees have a significant amount of rot in them by now.  They might be useful for a good campfire, but that is about it.
 
2014-03-25 04:39:30 PM  

MooseBayou: Answered above.  It's National Land.  But, don't they take timber from National Parks sometimes?  Or, do they have to sell it or lease it, like for oil drilling?


That completely depends upon the type of land that it is sitting on.  National Forest, Wilderness areas, National Parks, National Monuments, National Wildlife areas all typically have different regulations.  Right now, much of the Mount St Helens area is managed as a National Monument where extraction of natural resources is not allowed.
 
2014-03-25 04:43:05 PM  

Pangea: Seems like an enormous fire is virtually guaranteed if they wait long enough. Nothing can grow to consume the dead logs.


That area receives enough rain/snow that a large scale forest fire is unlikely.  This moisture also help fungus/bacteria grow and to accurate the rotting process.  It will be slow, but it will happen.
 
2014-03-25 05:09:35 PM  

reported: Many researchers have hypothesised what would happen if Yellowstone was to erupt now, with scientists predicting it would send 2,000 more debris into the air than Mount Saint Helens did when it blew in 1980.

... and that's a lot of debris!


Guess again...

i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-25 05:31:52 PM  
Imma let you finish Yellowstone Supervolcano , but the Siberian Traps produced the greatest volcanic cataclysm OF ALL TIME!
 
2014-03-25 05:37:33 PM  

Rev. Skarekroe: Well, sh*t.  There goes my entry in the office End of The World Scenario pool.


Nope "However, the experts note this is not proof of Yellowstone's impending death. " This is another "OMGWTFBBQ!!!11 YELLOWSTONE IS DYING" headline, when the article actually says "Nope, not yet."
 
2014-03-25 05:43:11 PM  
If memory serves me well, didn't Toba erupt about 70,000 years ago helping cause the last ice age?  So this tells me if we play our cards right, we can beat this global warming thing..  right?  right?  Hello, is any body out there???
 
2014-03-25 06:13:57 PM  
Yeah, I've been wondering about that hot spot.  It's been way overdue for an eruption, but some geologic activity (like old faithful) has been slowing down over the years.  My theory is that the hotspot has moved on or its cooled to the point of becoming a non-eruptive risk.  That's just based on my observations of reported data.  I'm getting ready to do my volcanoes lesson for my earth science class so I think I'll use this article for a homework assignment.
 
2014-03-25 06:23:51 PM  
If I'm not mistaken, modern science has not had an opportunity to study super-volcanoes prior to eruption.

Perhaps this is what they look like right before they blow their debris...

First, they lull you into false sense of security, see... then... KA-BLASTA!... Its all over. And that's how they getcha.... And you can tell, oh, its a clever one... Yes sir...  This one is playing the same game... It's gonna getcha!!!

(Sometime between tomorrow and 70,000 years form now.)
 
2014-03-25 07:25:16 PM  
So if the Yellowstone supervolcano is dying, then what's going in with the huge plume of magma that extends into the crust that causes the whole thing in the first place?
 
2014-03-25 09:53:46 PM  

Zeno-25: So if the Yellowstone supervolcano is dying, then what's going in with the huge plume of magma that extends into the crust that causes the whole thing in the first place?


It's like an abcess, the top dies so the infection can come out.
 
2014-03-25 09:53:47 PM  
But they made a movie and everything..
 
2014-03-26 09:09:07 AM  
Holy f*ck what a horrendously written article. Both from a writing and geologic perspective.
 
2014-03-26 09:37:04 AM  

menschenfresser: That's too bad. Fargo needs to be boiled away in a lake of lava.


SOON
give it time
 
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