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(The Local)   Nine jobs one can only do in Germany. And no, you can't do that one anymore   (thelocal.de) divider line 15
    More: Interesting, German citizenship  
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12005 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Mar 2014 at 8:16 AM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-03-25 08:26:27 AM
7 votes:
Click HERE to see the list

how about you go fark yourself
2014-03-25 08:41:06 AM
3 votes:

Plant Rights Activist: Click HERE to see the list

how about you go fark yourself


How does this kind of shiat get greenlighted?
2014-03-25 08:51:49 AM
2 votes:
There are thousands of stock photos of absurdly hot Oktoberfest dirndl beer girls, and this is the photo they went with???

www.thelocal.de

I guess you're welcome, farkettes.
2014-03-25 08:24:21 AM
2 votes:

PunGent: You know who else had a job unique to Germany?

/not trying to raise a furor here...


OH! I know this :-) It's the dude who designs the banknotes there!!
2014-03-25 01:58:09 PM
1 votes:

Tax Boy: There are thousands of stock photos of absurdly hot Oktoberfest dirndl beer girls, and this is the photo they went with???


www.40cozy.com

Fixed, kind of.
mhd
2014-03-25 09:46:46 AM
1 votes:
Okay, let's check:

#1 "Order Officer" - That makes it sounds like it's about queues. Better translation would be "code", and you've got lots of personnel for that in other countries, too. Canada, for example.
#2 "Beer Cop" - Same thing. As much as some politicians would like to abolish it, the US does check health codes for food.
#3 "VW Tower Keeper" - WTF?
#4 "Multilingual memorial minder" - WTF, part deux. Other countries do have private security, and some of them do know a few phrases in foreignish.
#5 "Oktoberfest beer hall staff" - Other countries have waiters, too. Most of them quite a bit more polite.
#6 "Nazi Crimes Compensation Official" - let's not mention the war
#7 "Legal Sex Worker" - Let me tell you about a magical place called Amsterdam...
#8 "Pfand Room Assistant" - That's a task, not a job. And a task the shop assistants actively try to avoid. Try finding one when the bin is full...
#9 "Nudist Zone Warden" - Quite fittingly they used a photo from the 60s. And yeah, other countries with nude beaches have no staff keeping out riffraff...
2014-03-25 09:45:57 AM
1 votes:

Mid_mo_mad_man: AirForceVet: My personal favorite: Beer Police.

I thought the purtiy laws were gone. Either way we have them in the USA also. We call them health inspectors. Most of the jobs elsewhere.


Not even close to the same thing. We can sell all types of shiat in a bottle and call it beer.  "Beer" with lemon, and cranberries in it, it just needs to be safe (relatively) for human consumption. The purity laws ensure that Bier, is really Bier.
2014-03-25 09:40:37 AM
1 votes:
I loved my time in Germany, (most off it spent in/near Dornstadt and Ulm) and would love to return.

/Ignore the story on the German jobs, and proceed directly to the farm girls calendar link at teh bottom of the page.
2014-03-25 09:28:37 AM
1 votes:

LazyMedia: ReapTheChaos: Pumpernickel bread: Legal prostitution and nude beaches?  How did Germany get the reputation for being so uptight.

Where did you hear they had that reputation? Germany is known for making some of the filthiest porn in the world, sexually speaking I would never call them uptight.

Plenty of U.S. Americans formed their impression of Germany from what grampaw told them about The War. The Bavarian corporal's pals, while often secretly freaky, were very uptight in their public morality pronouncements, and that reputation still has some credence among people who have never been to Europe and who probably never will go.

It's been my understanding that Germans are the most sexually promiscuous people in the world (although, apparently they're behind the Brits), which would be somewhat more awesome if the women believed in shaving their armpits and legs a bit more often.


Germans are uptight, about following laws.

They aren't prudes though.

I lived in Germany, and i never once saw a female hairy armpit. Or hairy lip on a female, that i can recall.
2014-03-25 09:22:47 AM
1 votes:

uttertosh: Badgerlad: Eeehm... The bottle recycling one isn't particularly specific to Germany. I know several people who had that as their first job in school here in Denmark.

Sweden here. Also saying THIS^


Michigan as well. We were one of the first states to have a bottle bill. Every supermarket does this in Michigan. It's a grubby, unpleasant job.

The Beer Hall Worker isn't unique to Germany, either. In Michigan we have a Bavarian town named Frankenmuth, and they have Oktoberfest every year.

This was a dumb slideshow by someone who didn't do much research.
2014-03-25 09:10:20 AM
1 votes:

child_god: abhorrent1: The 1516 Reinheitsgebot (purity laws) define what can go into beer - just barley, hops and water - and nothing else.

No sugar or yeast?

Also, good. They need this here. Fark your stupid moon dust gimmick beers

I looked it up.  TL;DR is they use yeast and grain mash. Yeast was added to the list later on.  The grain is germinated by soaking and left moist for a bit to activate the natural sugars, then roasted to kill the sprout from eating the sugars up.  From there, normal brewing occurs to make wort and then ferment with yeast.

I think I'll try this method on my next batch of brew.


They used to only use natural yeast I think, just like whatever happens to grow in there gets to be what's used.  I guess that's the way it used to be with bread and everything before they knew about yeast.  Once yeast was discovered and people elsewhere making beer were selecting their yeasts and having more stable, predictable batches, they decided to add yeast to the list.
2014-03-25 08:37:24 AM
1 votes:
...and well, technically, the Reinheitsgebot is no longer an absolute law, meaning there is no beer cop to enforce it.  There are certainly other regulations concerning beer and even ingredients in Germany, but again, not unique to Germany.
2014-03-25 08:33:15 AM
1 votes:
2014-03-25 08:20:04 AM
1 votes:

Badgerlad: Eeehm... The bottle recycling one isn't particularly specific to Germany. I know several people who had that as their first job in school here in Denmark.


Sweden here. Also saying THIS^
2014-03-25 06:44:44 AM
1 votes:
Eeehm... The bottle recycling one isn't particularly specific to Germany. I know several people who had that as their first job in school here in Denmark.
 
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