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(Medium)   What do you get when you send an Andromeda-sized galaxy hurtling through the center of the closest cluster of thousands of galaxies? Meet Messier 88   (medium.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, Virgo Cluster, plough, center of mass, solar masses, spirals, Milky Way, metallicity, supermassive black holes  
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2751 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Mar 2014 at 6:50 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-25 12:02:07 AM  
Messier 11 was no slouch either.

www.eliteprospects.com
 
2014-03-25 12:05:46 AM  
Messier 83 is alright, but I got really sick of that one damned song
 
2014-03-25 12:14:06 AM  
A lot of dead aliens a long while ago...

Sort of puts even the Permian extinction into perspective. As in: you only nearly killed all life on only ONE planet? Amateur deity...
 
2014-03-25 12:27:16 AM  

hubiestubert: A lot of dead aliens a long while ago...

Sort of puts even the Permian extinction into perspective. As in: you only nearly killed all life on only ONE planet? Amateur deity...


In last night's Cosmos one of the things NDT mentioned is that eventually Andromeda and the Milky Way will collide.  However, as catastrophic as that sounds, he mentioned that due to the enormous amount of space between objects in any galaxy, the chances are that the collision would not effect any life in either galaxy, other than making for a pretty spectacular light show in the night sky.
 
2014-03-25 12:28:01 AM  
Nothing, because we can't even make it Mars yet and whatever we're observing through telescopes is so old it already finished before the Dinosaurs had invented themselves.
 
2014-03-25 12:29:55 AM  

doglover: Nothing, because we can't even make it Mars yet and whatever we're observing through telescopes is so old it already finished before the Dinosaurs had invented themselves.


There were dinosaurs 60,000 years ago?
 
2014-03-25 12:52:45 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: doglover: Nothing, because we can't even make it Mars yet and whatever we're observing through telescopes is so old it already finished before the Dinosaurs had invented themselves.

There were dinosaurs 60,000 years ago?


No. Of course not.

the Dinosaurs It's capitalized and everything. 23 years ago.
 
2014-03-25 01:27:38 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: hubiestubert: A lot of dead aliens a long while ago...

Sort of puts even the Permian extinction into perspective. As in: you only nearly killed all life on only ONE planet? Amateur deity...

In last night's Cosmos one of the things NDT mentioned is that eventually Andromeda and the Milky Way will collide.  However, as catastrophic as that sounds, he mentioned that due to the enormous amount of space between objects in any galaxy, the chances are that the collision would not effect any life in either galaxy, other than making for a pretty spectacular light show in the night sky.


Yeah, I heard him say that.  Seems like it would still come down to luck though.  An enormous amount of space, sure; but an enormous amount of matter as well.  I picture it like two people throwing sand at each other.  The perspective I have trouble with is understanding the volume of sand in comparison to the space it flies through.
 
2014-03-25 02:35:37 AM  

Frederick: An enormous amount of space, sure; but an enormous amount of matter as well


Not exactly.

There's an enormous amount of space and practically no matter. So more like two people throwing a single grain of sand at each other from across a football field.
 
2014-03-25 06:55:36 AM  
No physical collisions, of course, but the gravitational attractions would really fark with everything.
 
2014-03-25 07:00:27 AM  

Frederick: TuteTibiImperes: hubiestubert: A lot of dead aliens a long while ago...

Sort of puts even the Permian extinction into perspective. As in: you only nearly killed all life on only ONE planet? Amateur deity...

In last night's Cosmos one of the things NDT mentioned is that eventually Andromeda and the Milky Way will collide.  However, as catastrophic as that sounds, he mentioned that due to the enormous amount of space between objects in any galaxy, the chances are that the collision would not effect any life in either galaxy, other than making for a pretty spectacular light show in the night sky.

Yeah, I heard him say that.  Seems like it would still come down to luck though.  An enormous amount of space, sure; but an enormous amount of matter as well.  I picture it like two people throwing sand at each other.  The perspective I have trouble with is understanding the volume of sand in comparison to the space it flies through.


So what you need NDT to say is, "You're not like sand"?
 
2014-03-25 07:44:48 AM  
Who blew M22?
 
2014-03-25 07:48:33 AM  
Guess you can't get any messier than that...
 
2014-03-25 08:58:17 AM  

doglover: Nothing, because we can't even make it Mars yet and whatever we're observing through telescopes is so old it already finished before the Dinosaurs had invented themselves.


According to the author of XKCD, you've exhibited on of the few overestimates in astronomy. Many stars we see are only 10s of light years away.
 
2014-03-25 09:02:12 AM  

TuteTibiImperes: hubiestubert: A lot of dead aliens a long while ago...

Sort of puts even the Permian extinction into perspective. As in: you only nearly killed all life on only ONE planet? Amateur deity...

In last night's Cosmos one of the things NDT mentioned is that eventually Andromeda and the Milky Way will collide.  However, as catastrophic as that sounds, he mentioned that due to the enormous amount of space between objects in any galaxy, the chances are that the collision would not effect any life in either galaxy, other than making for a pretty spectacular light show in the night sky.



After enough billions of years go by, the black holes at the center of the two galaxies will merge. The energy released by that may very well be enough to sterilize the entire galaxy.


Also, if you scroll down the article to get to the listing of the Messier objects, click on M-31, and scroll pretty far down, there is a "time lapse" view of the night sky from Earth during different stages of the galactic collision.
 
2014-03-25 09:50:56 AM  
give me doughnuts:

After enough billions of years go by, the black holes at the center of the two galaxies will merge. The energy released by that may very well be enough to sterilize the entire galaxy.


That's pretty unlikely. Even with the GRB that would likely happen, it would only shoot out at the axis points, not at all 360 degrees. The blast would be deadly, but only for a couple of hundred light years (within which there is unlikely to be life, anyway).

Space is freaking huge, with lots of empty space. A galactic collision is unlikely to do much harm to life, although perhaps a galactic cloud feeding a neutron star or white dwarf could eventually lead to a supernova/GRB.
 
2014-03-25 10:22:11 AM  
Someone's after Phil Plait's job of writing during a nerdgasm.
 
2014-03-25 11:00:17 AM  

Tobin_Lam: doglover: Nothing, because we can't even make it Mars yet and whatever we're observing through telescopes is so old it already finished before the Dinosaurs had invented themselves.

According to the author of XKCD, you've exhibited on of the few overestimates in astronomy. Many stars we see are only 10s of light years away.


But xkcd is shiat
 
2014-03-25 12:44:24 PM  
Pick up line for a sexy galaxy: "Hey baby... so do those arms go all the way to the core?"
 
2014-03-25 01:58:07 PM  

Captain Meatsack: Pick up line for a sexy galaxy: "Hey baby... so do those arms go all the way to the core?"


"You. . . you jerk!"
img.fark.net
/ Galaxy runs away crying
 
2014-03-25 03:06:21 PM  

Prey4reign: Messier 11 was no slouch either.

[www.eliteprospects.com image 230x256]



Came for this, leaving satisfied, except for the search for a follow-up Stanley Cup.
 
2014-03-26 03:02:53 PM  

TuteTibiImperes: other than making for a pretty spectacular light show in the night sky.


Did he actually say that part?  Because I don't think it would make for a spectacular light show either.  This is sort of a misconception.   With the unaided eye we can only see a nearby group of about 6000 stars.  A few more plus or minus, from the merger isn't going to make much difference.
 
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