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(Metronews.ca)   Man gives away modest sums of money to complete strangers he meets on the streets. Who better to send for psychiatric assessment?   (metronews.ca) divider line 54
    More: Asinine, P.E.I., psychiatric assessment, Richard Wright, Halifax Regional Police, Halifax  
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4468 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Mar 2014 at 3:44 PM (29 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-24 08:53:50 PM  
Honestly, if I had tons of money, I would thoroughly enjoy paying people's supermarket bills, etc., randomly. I'd go to a car repair facility and pay for someone's car to get fixed. I'd go to a hospital and pay someone's bill. This, to me, is real charity. And it's all right there, real time. No check to be cleared for some major organization, and part of that check goes to mailing the promo materials or the executives' salaries or to fund the regional galas.
 
2014-03-24 11:44:28 PM  
He must be crazy because the normal is to be greedy.
Pretty sad, the normal these days.
And some places even make it illegal to help people.

/And those people writing these laws would say they believe in God.
 
2014-03-25 01:07:41 AM  
It could be a symptom of bipolar disorder, yeah (making exuberant, poor choices with money).  Also he was telling them to "thank god" so they could wonder about schizophrenia (being overtly religious comes off as not particularly sane outside the USA and Afghanistan).

Someone else called the RCMP, concerned about the guy's state of mind ("wellness check"), the RCMP didn't just randomly accost him in the street.  If the RCMP decided to take him in then maybe he was talking to them in a manner that appeared either delusional or altered.  Since he was driving a car at the time, they could have been concerned that he was an immediate danger to the public.  They took him to hospital instead of to jail so that medical professionals could do their job.

Here is the hospital's comment:

"It is important for the public to understand that patients are admitted to our hospitals, programs and/or health care services because they can benefit from the care that we provide. A patient is always admitted at the clinical recommendation of a physician who has met with and assessed the patient to determine the most appropriate medical care to help that patient. In the case of mental health patients who may be admitted involuntarily (as they were assessed by two physicians to be of harm to themselves or others), there is a process, guided by the P.E.I. Mental Health  Act, to contest admission that the patient has a right to pursue."

Multiple doctors saw sufficient reason to hold onto him, and we'll never know what those reasons were because of privacy issues, and the family's hardly going to ruin a good sob story with inconvenient facts.

So long as he is assessed and then let go after the legal hold time, I have no problem with this.  Sounds like the system is working exactly as intended, actually.

This is Canada, people.  Neither the RCMP nor the hospital gain anything from holding the guy for no reason.  If anything mental health is usually underfunded and they don't want sane people clogging up the system.
 
2014-03-25 05:34:26 AM  
 
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