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(My Modern Metropolis)   National Geographic photographer stitched together 126 photos to compile one picture of "The President", the second-largest Sequoia Redwood on Earth, standing 247' tall. Oh yeah, it's 3,200 years old   (mymodernmet.com) divider line 41
    More: Spiffy, National Geographic, oldest tree, Single Image, giant sequoia, photographers  
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4174 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Mar 2014 at 1:51 PM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-24 11:31:57 AM
Wow, a 3,200-year-old picture.
 
2014-03-24 11:40:46 AM
So the tree was a sapling right around the fall of Troy, that's pretty amazing when you think about it.
 
2014-03-24 11:41:57 AM
That's very cool. Thanks for sharing.
 
2014-03-24 12:08:58 PM

TuteTibiImperes: So the tree was a sapling right around the fall of Troy, that's pretty amazing when you think about it.


it's more than half the age of the universe!
 
2014-03-24 01:28:49 PM
"The President"?  I'll need to see its long form birth certificate.  It might have gotten transplated here from Kenya.

WHAR BIRTH CERTIFICAT SEQUOIA WHAR
 
2014-03-24 01:32:03 PM
Big ass tree.
 
2014-03-24 01:55:32 PM
Tree panoramas are easy and fun with your phone if it's got a panorama mode. The tee is a pine tree along the trail in a local park.

farm8.staticflickr.com

I happen to have an iPhone but it should work well with other phone cameras. The main reason to do them with a phone is for the angle and perspective of the shot. I couldn't get far enough away from the tree to get it all in in a normal shot, so panorama mode to the rescue. Panned from top to bottom taking the shot.

Also in my Flickr photostream this Eastern Red Cedar at my house - my first successful vertical panorama.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95092956@N00/12364262324/in/photostream /

And a Sycamore tree stitched panorama consisting of 5 individual photos. I took more than 5 shots to be sure I had enough overlap, but the 5 shot version turned out better than ones with more shots included.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95092956@N00/12364533644/in/photostream /
 
2014-03-24 01:56:25 PM
If you've never had the opportunity to stand next to a giant sequoia or a coastal redwood, it's really hard to grasp just how huge these things are.

Redwoods tend to be taller; sequoias, more massive (which is why they're shorter - they tend to break off under their own weight at the top).  It's like standing next to a living building.  Further, because of chemicals secreted by the bark, insects don't really hang out.  That means few birds as well, so there's almost no noise in a redwood forest.  So, you're in this semi-lit, almost eerily silent, fern-covered expanse with a canopy somewhere 200+ feet above your head.

I always feel like a t-rex should go stomping by.
 
2014-03-24 02:11:43 PM
The Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto has a Wildlife Photo exhibit on and this photo is one of the ones in it (had an exhibit, I guess; it closed yesterday) and it in fact was the winning photo in its category.

Has TFA says, it's a composite and even understanding how tough composites are to do well, for a grand-prize winning photo, the stitching is surprisingly problematic with lots of visible faults.

But what jumps out first is the perspective issue with the guy at the top of the tree at least twice as large as the guy at the bottom.

Beautiful photo, to be sure, but they definitely didn't get it right and would have been better off to just have the person at the bottom of the tree in the photo. It would have made the scale a bit more of a shock (once you see the person) and would have served to mask the perspective mistake of the top of the tree being much larger in proportion to the bottom than it should be.
 
2014-03-24 02:17:12 PM
TuteTibiImperes

So the tree was a sapling right around the fall of Troy, that's pretty amazing when you think about it.

That right there.
 
2014-03-24 02:19:15 PM
Pardon Me Sultan:
But what jumps out first is the perspective issue with the guy at the top of the tree at least twice as large as the guy at the bottom.


was coming to say this - perspective is way off.
 
2014-03-24 02:36:01 PM

asciibaron: Pardon Me Sultan:
But what jumps out first is the perspective issue with the guy at the top of the tree at least twice as large as the guy at the bottom.


was coming to say this - perspective is way off.


Don't get too upset about it. In perspective, it's not a very big issue.
 
2014-03-24 02:42:25 PM

obenchainr: If you've never had the opportunity to stand next to a giant sequoia or a coastal redwood, it's really hard to grasp just how huge these things are.


yup.  i lived in Humboldt County for a bit, and every now and then we'd head down to "Avenue Of the Giants" and.....wow.  just amazing.
 
2014-03-24 03:10:21 PM
Looks shopped.
 
2014-03-24 03:13:41 PM
Hey we have the Senator...oh wait that crack head burnt it down to see her stash...

www.bangstyle.com
 
2014-03-24 03:22:59 PM

Facetious_Speciest: TuteTibiImperes
So the tree was a sapling right around the fall of Troy, that's pretty amazing when you think about it.
That right there.


Pando first sprouted before humans invented agriculture
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pando_%28tree%29
 
2014-03-24 03:26:16 PM
Cubicle Jockey

Pando first sprouted before humans invented agriculture

Which is just crazy awesome. Hard to imagine touching a living thing that old. So old it was mature before modern sapiens left Africa.
 
2014-03-24 03:31:59 PM
Awesome tree. Now get all those farktards to stop climbing in it before something dumb happens.
 
2014-03-24 03:51:20 PM

Facetious_Speciest: Cubicle Jockey

Pando first sprouted before humans invented agriculture

Which is just crazy awesome. Hard to imagine touching a living thing that old. So old it was mature before modern sapiens left Africa.


www.titaniumteddybear.net
 
2014-03-24 03:54:02 PM

obenchainr: If you've never had the opportunity to stand next to a giant sequoia or a coastal redwood, it's really hard to grasp just how huge these things are.

Redwoods tend to be taller; sequoias, more massive (which is why they're shorter - they tend to break off under their own weight at the top).  It's like standing next to a living building.  Further, because of chemicals secreted by the bark, insects don't really hang out.  That means few birds as well, so there's almost no noise in a redwood forest.  So, you're in this semi-lit, almost eerily silent, fern-covered expanse with a canopy somewhere 200+ feet above your head.

I always feel like a t-rex should go stomping by.



Seconded. Truly amazing how big those things are in person.
 
2014-03-24 03:54:58 PM
Um, I remember Nat Geo had a pic like this (sans snow) in the mag maybe four years ago.
 
2014-03-24 03:59:55 PM

Facetious_Speciest: TuteTibiImperes

So the tree was a sapling right around the fall of Troy, that's pretty amazing when you think about it.

That right there.


media1.giphy.com
 
2014-03-24 04:32:28 PM
Laughs at your measly 3500 years:
www.toptenzpictures.com

/Clonal organisms don't count, either.
 
2014-03-24 05:10:23 PM
"It is indeed a great tree."
 
2014-03-24 05:13:25 PM

EWreckedSean: Hey we have the Senator...oh wait that crack head burnt it down to see her stash...

[www.bangstyle.com image 615x398]


From the wiki: Officials said that they found images of the fire being started on Barnes' laptop and on her cellphone.

How dumb to you have to be to start a forest tree fire and then film it?

/Dumb enough to be a meth head, I guess
 
2014-03-24 05:24:38 PM

nocturnal001: obenchainr: If you've never had the opportunity to stand next to a giant sequoia or a coastal redwood, it's really hard to grasp just how huge these things are.

Redwoods tend to be taller; sequoias, more massive (which is why they're shorter - they tend to break off under their own weight at the top).  It's like standing next to a living building.  Further, because of chemicals secreted by the bark, insects don't really hang out.  That means few birds as well, so there's almost no noise in a redwood forest.  So, you're in this semi-lit, almost eerily silent, fern-covered expanse with a canopy somewhere 200+ feet above your head.

I always feel like a t-rex should go stomping by.


Seconded. Truly amazing how big those things are in person.


Things that are great about sequoias:

• Good gawd they're big!
• Spongy fibrous fire-resistant bark up to three feet thick
• They need fire to reproduce
• Sequoia cones are astonishingly small (especially so when viewed in comparison to the trees they produce)
• Douglas squirrels - Nature's court jesters!
• Standing next to a sequoia, even a "young" one only a thousand or so years old, makes me feel small and insignificant in the same way staring up at the night sky does

/awe and reverence
 
2014-03-24 05:35:53 PM

James!: Big ass tree.


HA! I just emailed TFA to my best friend (nature photographer nut) and put 'Big-ass tree' in the subject header.
 
2014-03-24 05:37:06 PM

DeadPhelps: standing next to a sequoia, even a "young" one only a thousand or so years old, makes me feel small and insignificant in the same way staring up at the night sky does

farm8.staticflickr.com vs farm9.staticflickr.com

/left is a friend at the Avenue of the Giants (coastal redwoods, so tiny by comparison); right is a selfie on top of Haleakala
 
2014-03-24 05:44:08 PM

give me doughnuts: Laughs at your measly 3500 years:
[www.toptenzpictures.com image 800x598]

/Clonal organisms don't count, either.


Why? Not like humans went back in time and did the cloning.
 
2014-03-24 05:44:38 PM
Here's a good measure of scale for that tree. These turbines are only 20 feet taller than the tree in the article. The two white blocks at the base of the tower are work trucks.img.fark.net
 
2014-03-24 05:58:13 PM
obenchainr: If you've never had the opportunity to stand next to a giant sequoia or a coastal redwood, it's really hard to grasp just how huge these things are.

yup. i lived in Humboldt County for a bit, and every now and then we'd head down to "Avenue Of the Giants" and.....wow. just amazing.


When mrs shantey and I visited shantey jr in San Francisco, we took a trip to Muir Woods to see the redwoods. I assume the trees there are Coastal Redwoods. Simply amazing. The size of these trees has to be seen to truly appreciate their majesty. They dwarf anything I've here on the right coast.
 
2014-03-24 06:00:58 PM

obenchainr: DeadPhelps: standing next to a sequoia, even a "young" one only a thousand or so years old, makes me feel small and insignificant in the same way staring up at the night sky does
[farm8.staticflickr.com image 334x500] vs [farm9.staticflickr.com image 334x500]

/left is a friend at the Avenue of the Giants (coastal redwoods, so tiny by comparison); right is a selfie on top of Haleakala


If that is a selfie, you must have really, really long arms.


Cool picture though.
 
2014-03-24 06:03:49 PM
A seven letter word that has all five vowels? That's a tough one. Say, you know, this place is the perfect place for my new mall. The Sequoia Shopping Center! No, Centre! Yeah, that's classier. "Why not make your next purchase in a natural wonderland?" shiat yeah. "The beauty of the living earth gently murmurs its envy of your impeccable taste in designer sportswear, something something, bla bla bla."

Send in the dozers, get these damn trees out of here. No, wait, get some pictures first, we'll photoshop them into the ads.
 
2014-03-24 06:54:53 PM

xria: If that is a selfie, you must have really, really long arms.


Cool picture though.


Tripod and a remote :)
 
2014-03-24 07:01:27 PM

obenchainr: If you've never had the opportunity to stand next to a giant sequoia or a coastal redwood, it's really hard to grasp just how huge these things are.

Redwoods tend to be taller; sequoias, more massive (which is why they're shorter - they tend to break off under their own weight at the top).  It's like standing next to a living building.  Further, because of chemicals secreted by the bark, insects don't really hang out.  That means few birds as well, so there's almost no noise in a redwood forest.  So, you're in this semi-lit, almost eerily silent, fern-covered expanse with a canopy somewhere 200+ feet above your head.

I always feel like a t-rex should go stomping by.


It's true that there's really no way to capture the sheer unearthliness of it if you haven't experienced it.

You forgot to mention my favorite thing about them: they're pyrophiliacs. Sequoia love fire and even need fire to reproduce. They're naturally fire resistant: their trunks are actually fluted in such a way that they act like natural chimneys.  From their "perspective", fire is just this useful phenomenon that clears out underbrush and competing trees.
 
2014-03-24 07:39:22 PM
obenchainr [TotalFark]

If you've never had the opportunity to stand next to a giant sequoia or a coastal redwood, it's really hard to grasp just how huge these things are.

^ This. While that picture is impressive it still can't give you the full impression of just how massive these things are. It's well worth a trip to see them.
 
2014-03-24 09:05:46 PM

Pardon Me Sultan: Beautiful photo, to be sure, but they definitely didn't get it right and would have been better off to just have the person at the bottom of the tree in the photo. It would have made the scale a bit more of a shock (once you see the person) and would have served to mask the perspective mistake of the top of the tree being much larger in proportion to the bottom than it should be.


If this is the same picture that was featured in the National Geographic magazine, there was a note about that perspective issue detailing that the person at the top of the tree was standing much closer to the camera than the person at the base.  It's not that the top of the tree is larger in proportion than it should be: it's an actual issue of part of the picture (the person) being much closer to the photographer.
 
2014-03-24 09:38:22 PM
Wow, so it sprouted right after Noah's flood!
 
2014-03-25 12:47:28 AM

lousyskater: Here's a good measure of scale for that tree. These turbines are only 20 feet taller than the tree in the article. The two white blocks at the base of the tower are work trucks.[img.fark.net image 850x637]


I think the little tiny human in an orange jacket, standing near the base of the tree, is a pretty good "measure of scale for that tree". :)

/that's a big farking tree
 
2014-03-25 07:19:12 AM
it's 3,200 years old

Well then it's obviously a hazard and should be cut down.
 
2014-03-25 10:02:53 AM

mrmopar5287: Pardon Me Sultan: Beautiful photo, to be sure, but they definitely didn't get it right and would have been better off to just have the person at the bottom of the tree in the photo. It would have made the scale a bit more of a shock (once you see the person) and would have served to mask the perspective mistake of the top of the tree being much larger in proportion to the bottom than it should be.

If this is the same picture that was featured in the National Geographic magazine, there was a note about that perspective issue detailing that the person at the top of the tree was standing much closer to the camera than the person at the base.  It's not that the top of the tree is larger in proportion than it should be: it's an actual issue of part of the picture (the person) being much closer to the photographer.


So.... a perspective mistake.......
 
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