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(Huffington Post)   Australians and Chinese spot possible plane wreckage, this is not a repeat from any point in the last 2 weeks   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 14
    More: Followup, Chinese, Indian Ocean, Tony Blinken, operations officer, chinese foreign ministry, Australian Navy, U.S. Pacific Command, Hong Lei  
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3316 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Mar 2014 at 7:57 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2014-03-24 08:22:56 AM
3 votes:
i think the lesson here is that there is more garbage floating around the world's oceans than we thought there was.
2014-03-24 08:56:39 AM
2 votes:

SeaMan Stainz: Rhino_man: SeaMan Stainz:

Everyone who flies, knows someone who flies or lives near any flight path has a very real safety concern here. Also, anyone who invests in Boeing, any airliner, or any company that invests in any such company has a financial concern. The 777 is a very commonly used aircraft, and without knowing the cause of this it's impossible to say whether or not every single aircraft in the fleet is susceptible to the same issue.

That's great and all, but these articles are all bullshiat and have no bearing on the finding of the plane. I guess if you need to be distracted by shiny things until they find any actual evidence, I stand corrected.


I'm really understanding the hate the "cool kids" on the internet have over this story. Yea, there isn't a hell of a lot to report other than, "nope, haven't found anything yet", but even that is, in and of itself, interesting.

Should we stop reporting on Syria until someone wins? Don't talk about the economy until the next stock market crash or everyone is billionaires?

I mean its a god damn giant plane with a couple hundred people on it, that just pretty much vanished. Thats pretty farking interesting and worthy of at least a daily, "so here is what we know\don't know" story.
2014-03-24 08:02:54 AM
2 votes:
Dude, just let it go cause, man, it's gone.
2014-03-24 09:29:24 AM
1 votes:

Wrath of Heaven: I'm not an NTSB accident investigator, but I did watch Air Disasters straight through this weekend.


Check out "Seconds from disaster".  They don't do exclusively air disasters but it's a damned interesting series.
2014-03-24 09:24:54 AM
1 votes:
I'm not an NTSB accident investigator, but I did watch Air Disasters straight through this weekend.

Short of foul play or someone deliberately turning off the transponder, a full engine failure could result in the transponder losing power regardless.

Even if the plane has an auxiliary power unit, they can take minutes to start up and actually provide sufficient power to critical systems.

In the case study I'm basing this off of, the plane did not receive enough fuel from ground crews due to a simple standard/metric conversion calculation.

/Holiday Inn
2014-03-24 08:43:13 AM
1 votes:

kimwim: It could have taken one of two arcs, one north, one south, right? So why isn't anyone looking at the arc to the north?


The northern one is primarily over land, so....

1. It isn't as time critical to find it. Even if you do nothing, eventually the thing will turn up on its own.
2. You have a much greater likelyhood that if it went down on that route, someone would have seen it.
3. Since that land belongs to various countries, it isn't as simple to get a dozen other countries to start flying around in its airspace looking for things.

The bigger issue here is lets say this is debris from the plane. Its been 3 weeks. Even if you have very accurate currents information for that area of the world and you can tie it back to where it probably drifted from, your search area which you now need to go back and start looking for the pinger from is still going to be huge. There are so many variables to try and sort out to trace it back to an impact point its nuts.

I'd be surprised if at the end of this week, the parties involved don't just go, "ahh, fark it" and throw their hands up and just wait for stuff to start drifting on to shore.
2014-03-24 08:36:56 AM
1 votes:
I bet if they find an actual plane wreckage that's it's going to be the wrong one.
2014-03-24 08:35:38 AM
1 votes:

SlothB77: i think the lesson here is that there is more garbage floating around the world's oceans than we thought there was.

www.localphilosophy.com
2014-03-24 08:32:13 AM
1 votes:

SeaMan Stainz:


Everyone who flies, knows someone who flies or lives near any flight path has a very real safety concern here. Also, anyone who invests in Boeing, any airliner, or any company that invests in any such company has a financial concern. The 777 is a very commonly used aircraft, and without knowing the cause of this it's impossible to say whether or not every single aircraft in the fleet is susceptible to the same issue.
2014-03-24 08:15:37 AM
1 votes:
www.chicagonow.com
2014-03-24 08:14:51 AM
1 votes:
God forbid they include the plane's pics of the debris, so we can speculate appropriately.
2014-03-24 08:14:28 AM
1 votes:

Wolf892: Snarky allusion to Lost!


Picture from "The Langoliers"!
2014-03-24 08:11:21 AM
1 votes:
Technically yes, it is.
2014-03-24 08:10:51 AM
1 votes:
It could have taken one of two arcs, one north, one south, right? So why isn't anyone looking at the arc to the north?
 
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