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(KMOV St. Louis)   So, about that prisoner that you sent to Missouri from Kansas to face theft charges... Well the charges were dropped and we didn't think he had any charges to face back in Kansas, so we let him go. Yep, totally our bad   (kmov.com) divider line 43
    More: Fail, Missouri, Kansas  
•       •       •

6399 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Mar 2014 at 12:44 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



43 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-24 12:04:32 AM  
The prisons are overcrowded and prison sentences are overprescribed. Theft is a minor crime that should be treated lightly. A couple weeks in lockup at the most.

Prison ruins lives. The harsher you treat prisoners and the "tougher on crime" you get, the more lives you ruin. Prison is essentially a punched ticket to a life that will never amount to anything, will never be able to take advantage of upward mobility, will always be a burden on society. The less of that we do to citizens, the better off we'll all be.
 
2014-03-24 12:18:45 AM  
You're supposed to be in that line, dumbass!
 
2014-03-24 12:54:33 AM  
So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?
 
2014-03-24 12:55:19 AM  
Well at least it was a murderer
 
2014-03-24 12:56:07 AM  
Oh, that's rich. He was doing small time, and was sent over to clear up an outstanding warrant. When the case was dropped they checked for warrants. Not that he was still doing time.
 
2014-03-24 12:57:57 AM  

99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?


Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.
 
2014-03-24 01:00:47 AM  
The specific individual in question:
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-03-24 01:00:58 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.


Kansas City is a common mistake?
 
2014-03-24 01:02:31 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.


Hell, even the Ruskies knew that!

img.fark.net
 
2014-03-24 01:02:43 AM  
Danger Avoid Death ,
Kansas City is a common mistake?


It is a little like Rockville.
 
2014-03-24 01:06:33 AM  

Enemabag Jones: The specific individual in question:
[3.bp.blogspot.com image 266x315]


I'm not sure.
 
2014-03-24 01:07:41 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.


Wichita is in Kansas, not a very common mistake.
 
2014-03-24 01:18:36 AM  
Yeah, it's like with, Georgia's IN Florida, dumbass!
 
2014-03-24 01:22:04 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.


ACTUALLLLLY; Kansas City is partially in Kansas, partially in Missouri.

So, technically, it's two towns. That's why, even though Kansas City has a larger population; Wichita is the most populous city in Kansas. I actually wouldn't be surprised if Kansas City had 2 separate police departments. The best part is; Kansas City has swallowed several smaller towns. I imagine that figuring out who has jurisdiction on what is the biggest wiener waggling competition ever.

/ off to google
 
2014-03-24 01:22:21 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.


There is a Kansas City, KS, you drungus!

img.fark.net
 
2014-03-24 01:22:33 AM  
redmid17
Enemabag Jones: The specific individual in question:
[3.bp.blogspot.com image 266x315]
I'm not sure.

He had got his face sat on and everything. Maybe you should check those files back there?
 
2014-03-24 01:25:37 AM  

iheartscotch: ...

2014-03-24 01:22:04 AM

Clint_Torres: ... 2014-03-24 01:22:21 AM

Dammit! Too slow!
 
2014-03-24 01:30:00 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Theft is a minor crime that should be treated lightly


fark that, I say, take all of your shiat and see how you like it.

Theft is a serious crime which should be punished severely.

/someone just stole my gf's bicycle, so i'm particularly peeved...
 
2014-03-24 01:30:32 AM  

99.998er: AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.

Wichita is in Kansas, not a very common mistake.


And Wichita Falls is in Texas, if I'm not mistaken.
 
2014-03-24 01:33:19 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.


There is a KCK and a KCMO, common mistake.
 
2014-03-24 01:35:50 AM  

Thingster: AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.

There is a KCK and a KCMO, common mistake.


And a KFC, which is usually a BIG mistake.
 
2014-03-24 01:38:26 AM  

Enemabag Jones: redmid17
Enemabag Jones: The specific individual in question:
[3.bp.blogspot.com image 266x315]
I'm not sure.

He had got his face sat on and everything. Maybe you should check those files back there?


Doesn't change anything. I'm still not sure.
 
2014-03-24 01:49:18 AM  
c181321.r21.cf0.rackcdn.com

Eh, freedom for me. They said I hadn't done anything, so I could go free and live on an island somewhere.

Oh. Oh, well, that's jolly good. Well, off you go, then.
 
2014-03-24 01:49:51 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: The prisons are overcrowded and prison sentences are overprescribed. Theft is a minor crime that should be treated lightly. A couple weeks in lockup at the most.


That depends on the details of the theft.

I could see sealing criminal records for minor crimes after a certain period of time.  There's no reason someone should be farked over for the rest of their lives because of something minor they did 20 years ago.
 
2014-03-24 02:02:51 AM  

wildcardjack: Oh, that's rich. He was doing small time, and was sent over to clear up an outstanding warrant. When the case was dropped they checked for warrants. Not that he was still doing time.


There should be a detainer placed on him in state and federal systems. The transferring (outgoing) jurisdiction should do that.

If he has convictions for theft, burglary and escape why should he be considered dangerous? None of those are violent crimes.
 
2014-03-24 02:22:06 AM  
he had a felony warrant out of Missouri, so he was transferred on that warrant. then when they ran him again after the charges were dropped, nothing came up on the computer because his warrants were kansas misdemeanor warrants, and since someone forgot to make a note that there was a detainer placed, they let him go.

not exactly earth shattering.
 
2014-03-24 02:26:55 AM  

feckingmorons: If he has convictions for theft, burglary and escape why should he be considered dangerous? None of those are violent crimes.


It doesn't say he should be considered dangerous BECAUSE he has convictions for theft, burglary and escape.
 
2014-03-24 06:13:50 AM  
Kansas Corrections spokesman Jeremy Barclay says McKenzie has several convictions in Kansas for theft, burglary and escape and should be considered dangerous.

Not sure how they're getting "dangerous" from three nonviolent crimes.  Something is missing from the story there.
 
2014-03-24 06:16:17 AM  

gfid: That depends on the details of the theft.


Nope.  Theft with any component of threat or violence is robbery, or sometimes treated as an assault depending where you're standing.  Different thing.
 
2014-03-24 06:32:14 AM  

Jim_Callahan: gfid: That depends on the details of the theft.

Nope.  Theft with any component of threat or violence is robbery, or sometimes treated as an assault depending where you're standing.  Different thing.


It's from a press release, not a legal document.
 
2014-03-24 06:55:54 AM  
Missouri, proving Abe Simpson right one prisoner at a time.
 
2014-03-24 07:32:02 AM  
ecx.images-amazon.com

I guess that Kansas prisoner reached...

(adjusts sunglasses)

the point of no return.


/ YEAHHHHHHH
 
2014-03-24 07:33:07 AM  

Jim_Callahan: gfid: That depends on the details of the theft.

Nope.  Theft with any component of threat or violence is robbery, or sometimes treated as an assault depending where you're standing.  Different thing.


And theft from a residence that you broke into is burglary or breaking and entering and shoplifting is a form of theft.  Stealing a car is a form of theft.  Theft from the postal service is a federal offense.  There's also theft by deception or fraud..

Come on.  Those are all varying circumstances that all have one thing in common:  THEFT.  The law does not treat them all the same.

In many cases, there is still some discretion in sentencing.
 
2014-03-24 07:37:58 AM  

gfid: Jim_Callahan: gfid: That depends on the details of the theft.

Nope.  Theft with any component of threat or violence is robbery, or sometimes treated as an assault depending where you're standing.  Different thing.

And theft from a residence that you broke into is burglary or breaking and entering and shoplifting is a form of theft.  Stealing a car is a form of theft.  Theft from the postal service is a federal offense.  There's also theft by deception or fraud..

Come on.  Those are all varying circumstances that all have one thing in common:  THEFT.  The law does not treat them all the same.

In many cases, there is still some discretion in sentencing.


And as I said, they didn't say he should be considered dangerous BECAUSE he has convictions for theft, burglary and escape.
 
2014-03-24 08:39:34 AM  

log_jammin: And as I said, they didn't say he should be considered dangerous BECAUSE he has convictions for theft, burglary and escape.


I agree and I don't think I commented on whether he should be "considered dangerous", but that got me curious.  A quick search reveals Kansas wants him for "aggravated escape".  I don't know what that entails, but I'm guessing he didn't just tunnel out like they did in the "Great Escape" (which this happens to be the anniversary of).

Okay, more info.  He ran off while taking out the trash and was chased on foot.  I don't know what makes that "aggravated", but there it is.  Maybe they know something we don't.  WTF do you take from that anyway?  Do you take it as an insult?  All I take from it is you probably should avoid him and contact law enforcement if you see him.
 
2014-03-24 08:47:06 AM  
Statute 21-3810: Aggravated escape from custody.

sounds like ti could be lots of things.
 
2014-03-24 09:26:52 AM  
I've actually been a part of one of these screw ups.

While working at the Attorney General's Office in Louisiana I helped on a case where we got an inmate extradited from Atlanta to Baton Rouge to face charges. The investigator in charge brought him to the court house and had him arraigned on Louisiana charges. The judge then released him to the lead investigator knowing that he was currently serving jail time in Atlanta. The judge assumed that the investigator would then set up his transfer back to Atlanta where he would continue to serve out his jail time there. The lead investigator had a massive brain fart and simply let him go. He thought that since the judge didn't remand him to custody that the inmate was then free to go. I was at the office when the investigator got back without the inmate. The entire office went balastic and a manhunt involving 4 police agencies started. We found the inmate at his mom's house the next day, because the first rule of being a criminal is to be stupid. The investigator quickly became a former lead investigator and wasn't ever trusted with anything again.

CSB
 
2014-03-24 02:41:07 PM  

Danger Avoid Death: 99.998er: AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.

Wichita is in Kansas, not a very common mistake.

And Wichita Falls is in Texas, if I'm not mistaken.


But does anything fall as Kansas City falls?
 
2014-03-24 08:31:38 PM  

Jim_Callahan: gfid: That depends on the details of the theft.

Nope.  Theft with any component of threat or violence is robbery, or sometimes treated as an assault depending where you're standing.  Different thing.


Theft and robbery are two completely different offenses. Steal a purse from a shopping cart, theft; steal a purse from a person, robbery; steal a purse from inside a car burglary.

Theft is not a violent crime.
 
2014-03-24 08:46:02 PM  
They guy got lucky, even BEFORE he was mistakenly released...

A lot of the time, even if you have a court date in the same state, or even County, you're just told tough shiat, you miss your court date and you either have a warrant sworn for your arrest or you're convicted in absentia.

Then, when you finally get out, you roll up your stuff and head to the discharge area, you do all of your paperwork, and right before you get to walk out the door, they do one last check for warrants. Which you now have because you missed your court date. So you have to go through all of the intake shiat over again, and go right back to a cell.

Sometimes, I swear it's a game. There's plenty of time to check beforehand and modify your sentence, but they like to finalize one before starting the next, like they enjoy that look when you realize that you aren't getting out.

Never happened to me(I was in County jail a few times for fines I couldn't pay), but I saw it happen to other people, and it was always 3 or 4 hours before they came back, meaning they were standing around in this little room waiting for the world's slowest farming paperwork, only to go back where they had been that morning.
 
2014-03-24 08:47:46 PM  

AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.


No, it says the Kansas DOC is looking for him after he was released from a Missouri jail.
 
2014-03-24 08:57:02 PM  

gfid: log_jammin: And as I said, they didn't say he should be considered dangerous BECAUSE he has convictions for theft, burglary and escape.

I agree and I don't think I commented on whether he should be "considered dangerous", but that got me curious.  A quick search reveals Kansas wants him for "aggravated escape".  I don't know what that entails, but I'm guessing he didn't just tunnel out like they did in the "Great Escape" (which this happens to be the anniversary of).

Okay, more info.  He ran off while taking out the trash and was chased on foot.  I don't know what makes that "aggravated", but there it is.  Maybe they know something we don't.  WTF do you take from that anyway?  Do you take it as an insult?  All I take from it is you probably should avoid him and contact law enforcement if you see him.


In AZ, escape got you an extra 6 months, even if all you did was get as far as the end of the block. It's why most of the time it's absolutely stupid for someone to try, especially if they have less than 5 years or so. Can you imagine some dumbass having a 6 month sentence get doubled because they tried to escape? Also, I don't think you were able to be a Trustee and get 2 for 1...

Other dumb one I heard of was someone who hid the jail shirt under their clothes so they could have it on the outside and look 'cool'. The moron swapped clothes right after he walked out the door and got picked up 10 minutes later by city cops who thought he'd escaped. He got something like 3 months extra for theft of County property.
 
2014-03-25 12:17:14 AM  

iheartscotch: AverageAmericanGuy: 99.998er: So if he had all sorts of charges pending in Kansas, why did Kansas hand him over to Missouri in the first place?

Kansas City is in Missouri. It's a common mistake.

ACTUALLLLLY; Kansas City is partially in Kansas, partially in Missouri.

So, technically, it's two towns. That's why, even though Kansas City has a larger population; Wichita is the most populous city in Kansas. I actually wouldn't be surprised if Kansas City had 2 separate police departments. The best part is; Kansas City has swallowed several smaller towns. I imagine that figuring out who has jurisdiction on what is the biggest wiener waggling competition ever.

/ off to google


wac.450f.edgecastcdn.net
 
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