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(Yahoo)   Greek yogurt? Never heard of it, say Greeks   (uk.news.yahoo.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, Greek, Greece, greek yogurt, Mediterranean diet, commercial director, European Economic Area  
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2648 clicks; posted to Business » on 23 Mar 2014 at 9:32 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2014-03-23 08:58:21 AM  
Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"
 
2014-03-23 09:36:08 AM  
 
2014-03-23 09:36:34 AM  

zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"


You mean the French don't call their deep fried potatoes French fries?

I am curious about those sneaky Belgium people and their waffles.
 
2014-03-23 09:38:30 AM  
Another marketing creation.
 
2014-03-23 09:47:56 AM  

BunkyBrewman: You mean the French don't call their deep fried potatoes French fries?


Oui, monsieur, we do not. We call them "fried apples of the earth."

Hold on a moment, I need to refill the egg reservoir on my French toaster.
 
2014-03-23 09:48:46 AM  
Call it marketing, call it a fad, I don't care.   I eat ridiculous amounts of yogurt and I like greek yogurt more than regular.   Cabot plain greek tastes like ice cream to me.
 
2014-03-23 09:52:34 AM  
fark Chobani.

Mak yer own fermented milk products.
 
2014-03-23 09:56:55 AM  

BunkyBrewman: zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"

You mean the French don't call their deep fried potatoes French fries?

I am curious about those sneaky Belgium people and their wafflmoustaches.


img.fark.net
"don't you agree he must have entered my room to gain access to mr. ratchet's apartment?"
img.fark.net
"i... can think of... no...  otherrr... rrreasonnn?"

anyhoo... fta:
And yet, in terms of marketing, neither the Greek state nor any Greek company had sought to stamp a patent on the product, unlike feta cheese which is now a protected EU term

grumpycatgood.jpg.  keep your feta, let jamie lee curtis handle the yogurt, and you keep sendin' that flaming kaseri over to greektown so new yorkers'll shadduppadeyfaces about da "casseroles"

OOPA!!
 
2014-03-23 10:04:58 AM  
They are full of more shiat than that John Denver.
 
2014-03-23 10:12:20 AM  

zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"


We call it American cheese.  Of course in the rest of the world they call it Oh My God What is This Plastic Crap!?
 
2014-03-23 10:13:28 AM  
Gay marriage?
Or, as we call it here in Vermont, marriage.
 
2014-03-23 10:16:16 AM  

RoyHobbs22: They are full of more shiat than that John Denver.


and fark swings full circle through the muppets
 
2014-03-23 10:27:54 AM  

zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"



Right. Do Chinese people go out for....wait for it...food? And, if they do, are they hungry again in 30 minutes?
 
2014-03-23 10:32:36 AM  
My daughter and I where in the freezer isle looking at ice cream to get and this guy near us says "New York Vanilla!? I'm from New York and I've never heard of that" I asked if they had Minnesota Vanilla there but he said no.
 
2014-03-23 10:45:40 AM  

Starshines: zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"

We call it American cheese.  Of course in the rest of the world they call it Oh My God What is This Plastic Crap!?


That is an exception. However I see it as an explanation, an apology and a warning to those who might be contemplating buying cheese.

Is this... cheese?

Well it's American cheese. You see... it's a pasteurized processed cheese food product... thing.

Ahh, so what is it good for?

Oh, the possibilities are endless! Grilled cheese sandwiches on plain white square bread! It pairs excellently with pressed luncheon meat, potted meat products, as well as bologna! (What... oh... we can't say that anymore.) OK... as well as a sliced sausage product which is vaguely reminiscent of a product of Bologna, Italy!

Feel free to serve it on saltines. It's less pretentious than Velveeta so your less affluent friends won't feel left out! Enjoy!!!
 
2014-03-23 10:54:09 AM  

Enormous-Schwanstucker: zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"


Right. Do Chinese people go out for....wait for it...food? And, if they do, are they hungry again in 30 minutes?


One problem for Chinese is that they might have to specify what kind of fire drill they are going to have.

"OK... is this the one where we practice getting out of a farking burning building... or is this the one where we run around the car before the light changes? This is important!!!"
 
2014-03-23 11:18:13 AM  

AltheaToldMe: fark Chobani.

Mak yer own fermented milk products.


I've done it. It was fun, but kind of more effort than it was worth. That said, to heck with Chobani. Fage is where it's at.
 
2014-03-23 11:38:39 AM  

Nabb1: I've done it. It was fun, but kind of more effort than it was worth. That said, to heck with Chobani. Fage is where it's at.


1.  Warm given amount of milk to 120F
2.  Stir in 1 tsp of plain yogurt
3.  Place container in oven with pilot light or oven light on for 12 hours.
4.  Enjoy tasty, preservative-free yogurt.
5,  Save money.

Optional:  Strain yogurt in cheese cloth for 2 hours to thicken as desired.

Not a whole lot of work there unless you went for the whole "Yogurt Making" machine and all the shiat that comes with it.

Followup:  Take your fresh yogurt and fill an ice cube tray with it.  Freeze.  Use one frozen cube per new batch of yogurt as a starter vs the tsp of plain yogurt.
 
2014-03-23 11:57:19 AM  

BunkyBrewman: zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"

You mean the French don't call their deep fried potatoes French fries?

I am curious about those sneaky Belgium people and their waffles.


Turns out they're freeze-dried and you can basically only get them from vending machines. A few locals got confused when I asked. "You could try going to Köln [Cologne, Germany]. Why would you come to Belgium for waffles?"

Didn't find anything in Köln either, but everything was closed up for Christmas.

And Belgian chocolate? Exterminated by the Nestlé corporation.

I did manage to find a decent creperie in Brussels though, snuggled in between an "American" restaurant (which specialized in beef & potato dishes) and an Italian eatery.

The world has gotten very small.

/no large, muscular Australians offered me vegemite sandwiches either :(
 
2014-03-23 12:03:46 PM  

Nabb1: AltheaToldMe: fark Chobani.

Mak yer own fermented milk products.

I've done it. It was fun, but kind of more effort than it was worth. That said, to heck with Chobani. Fage is where it's at.


img1.wikia.nocookie.net
phage?
 
2014-03-23 12:05:11 PM  

simusid: Call it marketing, call it a fad, I don't care.   I eat ridiculous amounts of yogurt and I like greek yogurt more than regular.   Cabot plain greek tastes like ice cream to me.


I'm just the opposite. Love every brand and flavor of regular yogurt, I've tried three different Greek varieties and didn't care for any of them. I'll stick to the cheap stuff.
 
2014-03-23 12:06:35 PM  

zamboni: Enormous-Schwanstucker: zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"


Right. Do Chinese people go out for....wait for it...food? And, if they do, are they hungry again in 30 minutes?

One problem for Chinese is that they might have to specify what kind of fire drill they are going to have.

"OK... is this the one where we practice getting out of a farking burning building... or is this the one where we run around the car before the light changes? This is important!!!"


Oh, you know, I forgot about that. Good catch!
 
2014-03-23 12:42:23 PM  
They don't call them "Buffalo Wings" in Buffalo, either.

// Buffalo

// Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.
 
2014-03-23 01:12:11 PM  

zamboni: Feel free to serve it on saltines. It's less pretentious than Velveeta so your less affluent friends won't feel left out! Enjoy!


www.gianteagle.com

Best stuff ever for getting the dog to take his meds.
 
2014-03-23 02:16:21 PM  
Subby, you bastard.  Next thing you'll tell me is that actual Chinese have never heard of General Tso's Chicken.
 
2014-03-23 02:22:31 PM  
Best dessert I ever ate was the sheep yogurt mentioned in the article, covered in a sauce made from raisins soaked in honey, and served with shot of white lightning distilled from wine.

/cooks in Crete don't fark around.
 
2014-03-23 03:46:11 PM  
pinkie.ponychan.net
2.bp.blogspot.com

"YOGURT?! I HATE YOGURT!"
 
2014-03-23 04:59:41 PM  
The sad truth is Greek Yogurt is just real yogurt, but because we live in America home of the farked up synthesized in a lab food produces, the stuff we call yogurt isn't real.  What we have come to learn as yogurt thanks to a-holes like Dannon, is more a milk/gelatine smoothie, instead of the real bacteria thickening process. See the real way takes a couple of days, when the gelatine version can be made in a few hours,sans cooling time. Also the gelatine version can be made with cheaper milk, like skim, where real yogurt needs milk fats to thicken.

I don't know the exact start of the term Greek yogurt, but I remember years ago see either Rachael Ray or Glada Looks-like-rachael-ray, were shown buying yogurt in a Greek grocer; it's easy to speculate that Greek grocers got a reputation for real yogurt and someone decided to cash in on it.
 
2014-03-23 05:32:21 PM  
Greek yoghurt is actually Bulgarian, Bulgarian yogurt is Ukrainian, Ukrainian yoghurt is Armenian, an Armenian yoghourt is just fermented milk like they've been making in Western and Central Asia since the domestication of cattle, horses, sheep, yaks, and other milk-producing animals, thousands of years ago.

In short, this is as much a misnomer as "American apple pie", or "Canadian bacon", or all North American cheeses except Monterey Jack (or is it Monterrey Jack?).

It is one of those things that doesn't really come from any where, that nobody can agree on, and that may not really exist except in the minds of marketers and advertising people.

In Canada, Canadian whiskey is called "rye". It is distilled from "wry humour".
 
2014-03-23 06:50:43 PM  

tjsands1118: See the real way takes a couple of days


See my post above.  Days is not correct.  In 12 hours, I have tasty yogurt.  In 18 hours, I have thicker, tangier yogurt.  No special machines or tools needed.
 
2014-03-23 07:42:04 PM  

brantgoose: Greek yoghurt is actually Bulgarian, Bulgarian yogurt is Ukrainian, Ukrainian yoghurt is Armenian, an Armenian yoghourt is just fermented milk like they've been making in Western and Central Asia since the domestication of cattle, horses, sheep, yaks, and other milk-producing animals, thousands of years ago.

In short, this is as much a misnomer as "American apple pie", or "Canadian bacon", or all North American cheeses except Monterey Jack (or is it Monterrey Jack?).

It is one of those things that doesn't really come from any where, that nobody can agree on, and that may not really exist except in the minds of marketers and advertising people.

In Canada, Canadian whiskey is called "rye". It is distilled from "wry humour".


I loves me some peameal bacon!  Half my family lives in Hamilton and Guelph.  It's all I really eat when I go to visit.  Considering it's origins in Toronto, wouldn't that actually be Canadian Bacon?
 
2014-03-23 08:31:44 PM  

AltheaToldMe: Nabb1: I've done it. It was fun, but kind of more effort than it was worth. That said, to heck with Chobani. Fage is where it's at.

1.  Warm given amount of milk to 120F
2.  Stir in 1 tsp of plain yogurt
3.  Place container in oven with pilot light or oven light on for 12 hours.
4.  Enjoy tasty, preservative-free yogurt.
5,  Save money.

Optional:  Strain yogurt in cheese cloth for 2 hours to thicken as desired.

Not a whole lot of work there unless you went for the whole "Yogurt Making" machine and all the shiat that comes with it.

Followup:  Take your fresh yogurt and fill an ice cube tray with it.  Freeze.  Use one frozen cube per new batch of yogurt as a starter vs the tsp of plain yogurt.


I've been cloning yogurt for years doing more or less the above method.  If you are looking to try something slightly different, after my wife and I went to Iceland we started cloning skyr - the process is the same more or less but you need some rennet as well.
 
2014-03-23 09:31:20 PM  
I got fat eating Greek Yogurt.  Fat free my ass.
 
2014-03-23 10:32:09 PM  
Whatever you want to call it, Fage is the only brand that calls itself "Greek yogurt" that actually has the same taste and texture as the stuff in Greece. Half the stuff on the market now isn't even real strained yogurt, it's the stuff with gelatin with an extra dose added to make it thicker.
 
2014-03-23 11:12:59 PM  
I would love it if the next big trend in yoghurt was yoghurt made from milk obtained from wild Rocky Mountain big horn sheep. Think of the hazard pay for the people that have to do the milking.
 
2014-03-23 11:34:55 PM  

zamboni: Probably not so much that they never heard of it, they just don't call it that.

I mean, residents of Mexico City probably don't say "Hey, let's go out for some Mexican food!"


...and we're done. Of course the Greeks have heard of strained yogurt. The fact that they don't call it "Greek yogurt" simply means that "Greek yogurt" isn't a protected term.

rynthetyn: Whatever you want to call it, Fage is the only brand that calls itself "Greek yogurt" that actually has the same taste and texture as the stuff in Greece. Half the stuff on the market now isn't even real strained yogurt, it's the stuff with gelatin with an extra dose added to make it thicker.


There are more than a few folks producing proper strained yogurt, not that gelatin-laced crap. Yoplait is about as close to yogurt as vegan carob is to Godiva truffles.
 
2014-03-23 11:53:27 PM  
They lost when they went with the name "Fage."
 
2014-03-24 12:28:52 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: Another marketing creation.


foodfamilyfinds.com
 
2014-03-24 05:41:30 AM  
Same with corned beef and cabbage, utterly unknown here in Ireland.

/we eat bacon and cabbage
 
2014-03-24 09:03:53 AM  

Bonzo_1116: cooks in Crete don't fark around.


Well, they're Cretans, so...
 
2014-03-24 11:09:51 AM  

wingnut396: zamboni: Feel free to serve it on saltines. It's less pretentious than Velveeta so your less affluent friends won't feel left out! Enjoy!

[www.gianteagle.com image 600x600]

Best stuff ever for getting the dog to take his meds.


Glad to know I'm not the only one with a medicated cheese inhaling dog.
 
2014-03-24 01:38:05 PM  

wingnut396: zamboni: Feel free to serve it on saltines. It's less pretentious than Velveeta so your less affluent friends won't feel left out! Enjoy!

[www.gianteagle.com image 600x600]

Best stuff ever for getting the dog to take his meds.


We use peanut butter.  Since the dog is getting heart pills, it's unsalted (hork).
 
2014-03-24 02:19:37 PM  
I remember years ago that an Australian camp counselor declaring that Australian toaster biscuits have never existed in Australia.
 
2014-03-24 02:38:19 PM  

AltheaToldMe: 1. Warm given amount of milk to 120F
2. Stir in 1 tsp of plain yogurt
3. Place container in oven with pilot light or oven light on for 12 hours.
4. Enjoy tasty, preservative-free yogurt.
5, Save money.

Optional: Strain yogurt in cheese cloth for 2 hours to thicken as desired.

Not a whole lot of work there unless you went for the whole "Yogurt Making" machine and all the shiat that comes with it.

Followup: Take your fresh yogurt and fill an ice cube tray with it. Freeze. Use one frozen cube per new batch of yogurt as a starter vs the tsp of plain yogurt.


Some alternatives to your steps.
1.  It can be advised by some to first heat the milk up briefly to 160F, then cooling to 120F.  The reason is to kill off any bacteria present.  I suppose if you are freshly opening a bottle of Pasteurized milk, this may not be of concern.

But if it is a bottle you have been drinking from prior, then you may want to do this.  Commonly people may make yogurt out of milk that they would otherwise discard - in which case this is a good idea.  Point being - you only want 1 kind of bacteria in your yogurt, and that is the probiotic kind that turns the milk into yogurt.

I've seen others say bringing it to 185F and keeping it there for 30 minutes has an effect on the milk proteins that will result in nicer yogurt.  You might want to experiment with that one.

2.  Instead of using store bought yogurt as a starter, alternatively you can break open a pill containing acidophilus(there also a few other types that can be used).  This is a commonly sold probiotic pill - generally found in both the vitamin and digestive health isles.  Store bought yogurt may have very little living bacteria left by the time you buy it.  This should have comparatively MUCH more.

3.  Really you are supposed to hold it at 120F for 7 hours.  This the ideal temperature for the probiotic bacteria to prosper and do their work.  I did mention first bringing the temperature up, then cooling it to this.  If you have a sink partially filled with cold water(possibly even with ice cubes), then this will speed up that cooling process.

As for keeping it that temperature - yes if you oven can keep that temperature sure why not?  If it is a gas oven though, I'm not sure off hand if the culture needs to "breath" or not and if the byproducts of combusted gas will have any effect on your yogurt.  An electric oven I think (assume) would be better.  Or a hotplate out of the way in a corner somewhere - covered with something like a cheese cloth (or even a clean dish towel).

As you said, you can leave it longer if desired by individual tastes for tangier, thicker yogurt.  Obviously stir really well once done.

4 and 5  Can't argue with that.

Reusing your culture is a perfectly good idea.  It is best to isolate the part you will be reusing before eating it from it - as you have done.

Other notes:
1.  sanitize the pans you will use first.  Again we only want 1 kind of bacteria here!  Put water in the pan you will use, and bring it to a boil.  You can poor out the water after this obviously.
2.  You may want to put the pan you will use inside of a larger pan.  That larger pan should be partially filled with water.  That way the heat is evenly distributed.
3.  You did not mention the important step of leaving it in your fridge overnight!  That is sort of important.  The coldest part of your fridge if you will.  It will be thicker after the cooling it overnight.
4.  Straining if you so desire.  I don't like strained yogurt.  Nor do I think that "reduced fat" is healthier for you.  Fat is actually quite healthy for you and will raise your metabolism when consumed.  Eating fat does not make YOU fat.  The body is counter-intuitive at times and this is one of those times.  You are better off reducing your carbohydrate intake (especially simple carbs) for calorie reduction.
5.  Add whatever sort of flavoring you like.  Add some fresh fruits and the yogurt into a blender.  Or instead you might make it into something like tzatziki sauce.  Good tzatziki sauce is one of the greatest things in life.
 
2014-03-24 02:56:11 PM  

bk3k: 3. Really you are supposed to hold it at 120F for 7 hours. This the ideal temperature for the probiotic bacteria to prosper and do their work.


Excellent additions!  The higher temps are especially important when using fresh, raw milk, but the fresh, store-bought, pasteurized milk rarely needs this.

Depending on the culture that you're using will determine the temperature at which you hold the fermentation process.  Mesophilic cultures operate somewhere between room temperature and body temperature.  Thermophilic cultures like to be held at the higher temperatures for the fermentation process.

So far, I have had great success with the gas oven and the pilot light.  Most modern gas ovens don't have pilots any more.  My oven maintained about 87F all the time.  Now I have an electric oven and the oven light being on (60W clear bulb) maintains about the same temp.  I kept the stainless steel pan covered during the fermentation process.


I started with generic, plain, active-culture store bought yogurt and have used my own in the ice trays since then, so I am not sure what culture I have.  Judging by the success at the temperatures I am using, I assume I have the mesophilic cultures.

bk3k: 5. Add whatever sort of flavoring you like. Add some fresh fruits and the yogurt into a blender. Or instead you might make it into something like tzatziki sauce. Good tzatziki sauce is one of the greatest things in life


And SOOOOOO much of this!  Tzatziki is great on so many things.
 
2014-03-24 04:25:54 PM  
This is because of how Americans have gotten conditioned to think that if something's Middle Eastern, then it must be evil.
 
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