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(Daily Mail)   Would you let your 14-year-old daughter quit school so you can retire and live off her vast earnings?   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 48
    More: Obvious, Maisie Williams, Game of Thrones, the Mail, Arya, Sean Bean, law of demand, stardom, GCSE  
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11372 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 23 Mar 2014 at 9:09 AM (22 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



48 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-23 08:52:29 AM
Together, the school and Maisie's mother decided that she should leave and be schooled by tutors.

Not exactly the horror story subby is painting.

She continued studying until 16 (as the law required). She didn't sit her GCSEs, but she's not required to, anymore than kids in the US are required to get their high school diploma. She can always go back later, with the money to pay for school, if things don't work out after the series.

And NO WHERE in the article did it say mom was living off the daughter. Although, as a GOOD mom, she should be staying full time with her daughter with her intense travel and work schedule to keep her grounded.
 
2014-03-23 09:14:00 AM
School is needed so you can get a good job so you can work to make money. If you already have a good job, school is not needed.

I just hope the mom thought here clever plan through considering the high death rate amongst Game of Thrones characters.
 
2014-03-23 09:23:11 AM
The problem with living off the earnings of a 14yr old is what happens when you piss off the 14yr old. And them being 14 it's nearly impossible to not piss them off.
 
2014-03-23 09:23:21 AM
Dear Maisie,
Get away from your mother as quickly as possible.
Signed,
Every Child Actor Ever
 
2014-03-23 09:32:21 AM
That was actually a decent df article. Everything the mom had to say seemed pretty reasonable to me.
 
2014-03-23 09:32:35 AM
How much money are we talking about?
 
2014-03-23 09:33:57 AM
Can always count on the Fark Brigade to take the glass is half empty view of things. She has as much chance for things to be fine in the long run as for things to be bad.
 
2014-03-23 09:34:18 AM
Well yeah.
Tutors are teachers, you know.
 
2014-03-23 09:39:32 AM

SecretAgentWoman: Together, the school and Maisie's mother decided that she should leave and be schooled by tutors.

Not exactly the horror story subby is painting.

She continued studying until 16 (as the law required). She didn't sit her GCSEs, but she's not required to, anymore than kids in the US are required to get their high school diploma. She can always go back later, with the money to pay for school, if things don't work out after the series.

And NO WHERE in the article did it say mom was living off the daughter. Although, as a GOOD mom, she should be staying full time with her daughter with her intense travel and work schedule to keep her grounded.


Well in the USA most states have more stringent requirements now, I know in Georgia they require kids attend until 18 or they will fine and even jail the parent after enough absences. We got a letter from the school even after getting permission to take the step kid to Europe and letting him write papers for each class on the experience. It was auto generated by the county which shocked me by how they had to force parenting now.

Also, I would be willing to bet quite a few 14 year olds couldn't spell Hallelujah, its not an easy word for kids.
 
2014-03-23 09:41:42 AM
i.dailymail.co.uk

Ahh, Britain
 
2014-03-23 09:45:10 AM
Well hopefully she will be smart enough to learn from child actors of the past and once the show wraps up or her character dies she will get back to school.
 
2014-03-23 09:50:05 AM

machoprogrammer: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x764]

Ahh, Britain



Grab the cash quick, missy....your time in the limelight ain't gonna last very long.

#UK.Hot.No.Edukashun
 
2014-03-23 09:50:41 AM

SecretAgentWoman: And NO WHERE in the article did it say mom was living off the daughter. Although, as a GOOD mom, she should be staying full time with her daughter with her intense travel and work schedule to keep her grounded.


Pretty much this.

If I was in a similar situation, I would have hated retiring...by my first responsibility would have been to my child.  At this point, Mom is acting as her manager.  Hopefully Mom is smart and is putting the money away...because if history has told us anything, child stars are good at turning into fark-ups once they get their hands on the money.
 
2014-03-23 10:13:20 AM
A shot at TV stardom? No. To be in a major TV series? Yes, absolutely.

Most stuff kids learn from 14 to 16 is pointless except to pass exams. And you pass exams so you can do more exams, which allow you to go to higher education to do a specialism or to go to work and show you're capable of working because of your exams. But, you will never use 90+% of what you learn in those years. If your specialisation is acting, well, you got there years before your peers and have Game of Thrones on your CV.

At 14, I knew I wanted to be a programmer. I spent my evenings writing little games and stuff. And those hours were far more important to me than any subject I did at school.
 
2014-03-23 10:19:45 AM

Clash City Farker: School is needed so you can get a good job so you can work to make money. If you already have a good job, school is not needed.

I just hope the mom thought here clever plan through considering the high death rate amongst Game of Thrones characters.


I've got a feeling that Arya is a pretty safe bet to make it to the last book (along with Jon Snow, Tyrion, and Daenerys). That doesn't mean that the show couldn't recast her, but she's got a lot of job security.
 
2014-03-23 10:26:42 AM
Sadly she looks like a younger version of her mother, so I hope she is saving as much of her earnings as she can. She may have a future as a character actor, but she just doesn't look the part of a lead. It works as an intense child, but childhood comes to an end.
 
2014-03-23 10:30:10 AM

CarnySaur: Dear Maisie,
Get away from your mother as quickly as possible.
Signed,
Every Child Actor Ever


This. I really hope that all the $ she earns as a young actress does not mysteriously disappear when she turns 18.
Also I hope that she hires a real financial planner or someone that will help her manage her wealth.

 If that person is "Mom", then it is not going to be there when GoT ends / she turns 18. I would bet on it. Granted, I would bet a shiny nickel, but hey - there it is.
 
2014-03-23 10:39:09 AM

madgonad: Sadly she looks like a younger version of her mother, so I hope she is saving as much of her earnings as she can. She may have a future as a character actor, but she just doesn't look the part of a lead. It works as an intense child, but childhood comes to an end.


When I looked at this my first thought was 'yep thats a solid example of make sure you meet the mom before you commit to see how the daughter will look in 25 years....'
 
2014-03-23 10:48:26 AM

farkeruk: A shot at TV stardom? No. To be in a major TV series? Yes, absolutely.

Most stuff kids learn from 14 to 16 is pointless except to pass exams. And you pass exams so you can do more exams, which allow you to go to higher education to do a specialism or to go to work and show you're capable of working because of your exams. But, you will never use 90+% of what you learn in those years. If your specialisation is acting, well, you got there years before your peers and have Game of Thrones on your CV.

At 14, I knew I wanted to be a programmer. I spent my evenings writing little games and stuff. And those hours were far more important to me than any subject I did at school.


All this.  Part of the real world is connections and relationships too.  Just completely disregarding the acting experience and CV thing, compare where she is or would be in a few years when GoT ends.   She has traveled the world, attended fancy insider events, and knows a number of directors, actors, actresses, producers etc.  Making a phone call like 'Hey John!  I hope you have been well.  How is the family?  Oh great.  Hey Catherine told me you were working on some new show about xyz and it sounded pretty cool.  I was curious who you had in mind for one of the characters because I would be pretty interested in talking about' is infinitely more helpful than going to some casting call with 1000 people and crossing your fingers.  Not to mention having a friend say 'Hey John is working on some new project, you should talk to him about it.  I think you'd be perfect!' is about 1000x more valuable then going to random audition after audition and hoping you finally get a shot.
 
2014-03-23 11:14:50 AM

NickelP: All this.  Part of the real world is connections and relationships too.  Just completely disregarding the acting experience and CV thing, compare where she is or would be in a few years when GoT ends.   She has traveled the world, attended fancy insider events, and knows a number of directors, actors, actresses, producers etc.  Making a phone call like 'Hey John!  I hope you have been well.  How is the family?  Oh great.  Hey Catherine told me you were working on some new show about xyz and it sounded pretty cool.  I was curious who you had in mind for one of the characters because I would be pretty interested in talking about' is infinitely more helpful than going to some casting call with 1000 people and crossing your fingers.  Not to mention having a friend say 'Hey John is working on some new project, you should talk to him about it.  I think you'd be perfect!' is about 1000x more valuable then going to random audition after audition and hoping you finally get a shot.


The simplest rule in work is that people want reliable, good people. They'll take them over unknown but perhaps better people.

You just have to look at how often filmmakers collaborate with the same DPs, the same composers, and with directors like Christopher Nolan, Stephen Soderbergh and PT Anderson, the same actors.

There's half a dozen guys I'll always go to first when a company I'm working for needs someone, and they're people who I've worked with before that I know can do the job.
 
2014-03-23 11:19:45 AM

Clash City Farker: School is needed so you can get a good job so you can work to make money. If you already have a good job, school is not needed.


Judging by this comment, I'm guessing you never made it past grade school?
 
2014-03-23 11:20:07 AM

farkeruk: The simplest rule in work is that people want reliable, good people.


Pull the other one.  It took me four careers and fourteen years to find a company that thought this way.  Granted the company is doing very well, but the conjecture that this is the prevailing mentality is dubious.
 
2014-03-23 11:21:55 AM

farkeruk: Most stuff kids learn from 14 to 16 is pointless except to pass exams.

Well, these days anyway.

farkeruk: I spent my evenings writing little games and stuff. And those hours were far more important to me than any subject I did at school.

Congrats on your single data point.  Collect a few thousand more and get back to us, yes?
 
2014-03-23 11:23:30 AM
Let's see... Invoking Ariel Winter for the parent living off the kid, Jackie Coogan and Shirley Temple for watching the money disappear, and Danica McKellar (for starters) on continuing education.

As far as daughters looking like the mothers, there's Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds.
 
2014-03-23 11:56:22 AM
As a father no, as ASOIAF fan, yes.
 
2014-03-23 12:03:57 PM

steamingpile: SecretAgentWoman: Together, the school and Maisie's mother decided that she should leave and be schooled by tutors.

Not exactly the horror story subby is painting.

She continued studying until 16 (as the law required). She didn't sit her GCSEs, but she's not required to, anymore than kids in the US are required to get their high school diploma. She can always go back later, with the money to pay for school, if things don't work out after the series.

And NO WHERE in the article did it say mom was living off the daughter. Although, as a GOOD mom, she should be staying full time with her daughter with her intense travel and work schedule to keep her grounded.

Well in the USA most states have more stringent requirements now, I know in Georgia they require kids attend until 18 or they will fine and even jail the parent after enough absences. We got a letter from the school even after getting permission to take the step kid to Europe and letting him write papers for each class on the experience. It was auto generated by the county which shocked me by how they had to force parenting now.

Also, I would be willing to bet quite a few 14 year olds couldn't spell Hallelujah, its not an easy word for kids.


Being tutored IS getting your education and is allowed in the US, there are guidlines and requirement. Some tutors are even the kid's parents - homeschooling.
 
2014-03-23 12:22:10 PM
She looks dramatically different than the Arya from season 1.  Perhaps they can use a little CGI to make her look younger.
 
2014-03-23 12:39:07 PM
Someone else who decided he didn't need a formal education to succeed.

img.fark.net
 
2014-03-23 12:53:18 PM

Snargi: Someone else who decided he didn't need a formal education to succeed.

[img.fark.net image 399x241]


Of course he had a formal education.  He went to very good schools up to age 16.  University was not necessary, but that's not particularly unusual.

There's a difference between not having a university education and being an ignoramus.
 
2014-03-23 01:27:21 PM
Mum in TFA:

'If she needs to go back and do GCSEs she can, and will also have the money to get tutors to help her to do it.
'I'm not saying you don't need an education. My eldest son went to university and got his degree, and that worked for him.
'But you have to look at each case individually. You can always go back and get your education and these opportunities aren't going to be there for ever.'

 Interesting that the Fail is on the Mom about this. Isn't the mum's staetement the sum of the conservative mindset on education? That not everyone should go to college? Oh wait, it's a GIRL who is not following the proper path. Never mind.
 
2014-03-23 01:28:52 PM
Argh. Stupid typos. Why does Firefox auto-correct "statment" to "staetement"  instead of "statement?"
 
2014-03-23 01:32:37 PM

Pumpernickel bread: She looks dramatically different than the Arya from season 1. Perhaps they can use a little CGI to make her look younger.


Maybe they'll use the Faceless Men apprenticeship as an explanation...

/ yeah, i know that's a bit of a stretch...
 
2014-03-23 02:21:59 PM
Look at the picture of her Mom.
It is really goddamn obvious that she isn't getting her hair done, no plastic surgery, no personal style consultant, no dentist, no personal trainer....

that sounds mean, but it isn't meant to. She was a frumpy British housewife when Maisie started the show, and from all appearances she is still the same as she was.

Of course, she could have replaced the old station wagon with a Bugatti Veyron. But judging a book by its cover says she isn't going wild with Maisie's money.
 
2014-03-23 02:37:38 PM

machoprogrammer: Ahh, Britain


Shrek?
 
2014-03-23 02:49:42 PM

GungFu: machoprogrammer: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x764]

Ahh, Britain


Grab the cash quick, missy....your time in the limelight ain't gonna last very long.

#UK.Hot.No.Edukashun


The UK doesn't have a problem with casting ordinary-looking people to major roles. That's an American thing. For example, this is the actress in Broadchurch on the BBC:

4.bp.blogspot.com

And in the US version she's been replaced with:
content2.catalog.photos.msn.com

They kept David Tennant, though.
 
2014-03-23 03:24:24 PM

Mike Chewbacca: And in the US version she's been replaced with:
[content2.catalog.photos.msn.com image 266x400]

They kept David Tennant, though.


Is she about to sneeze?
 
2014-03-23 03:32:13 PM
I actually thought the mom was being reasonable.  The kid is one of the biggest stars on one of the hottest shows, not auditioning for community plays on the weekend hoping to make it big.  Working and getting paid now can only help her education later, when she's really able to focus on it.  In contrast, I recall reading that the kids from Harry Pottter did quite well academically, but I'm not sure their schedules were like filming for TV.
 
2014-03-23 03:34:45 PM
farkeruk: But, you will never use 90+% of what you learn in those years. If your specialisation is acting, well, you got there years before your peers and have Game of Thrones on your CV.

I love to learn things, the Intertubes have been great for spending an hour reading about Albainian history, for example. However, I absolutely hated with all the fire of all the suns in the Crab Nebula going to school. I learn stuff really quickly and it was maddening sitting there, bored out of my skull, waiting for Johnny and Janie to catch up. Plus, by about the 9th grade, I realized that we were just learning the same stuff again, only in more detail. I couldn't wait to get out of school.

/Graduated in1978
//Didn't have AP classes or any of that at my school
 
2014-03-23 04:54:29 PM

Mike Chewbacca: GungFu: machoprogrammer: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x764]

Ahh, Britain


Grab the cash quick, missy....your time in the limelight ain't gonna last very long.

#UK.Hot.No.Edukashun

The UK doesn't have a problem with casting ordinary-looking people to major roles. That's an American thing. For example, this is the actress in Broadchurch on the BBC:

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 454x255]

And in the US version she's been replaced with:
[content2.catalog.photos.msn.com image 266x400]

They kept David Tennant, though.


---Not just a US / UK thing.  Spanish movies / TV have more average looking people, Mexican and most So. American TV tend to use pretty people.  Mexico especially tends to be US-level of using pretty people.

/ GIS Mexican Soap Operas for examples
 
2014-03-23 05:41:49 PM

steamingpile: how they had to force parenting now


What exactly do you mean by "now"? There was never a time when parents somehow were magically all good, and it's a particularly odd qualification in this context because mandatory secondary education is a very new concept in the history of civilization (and fairly new even in the history of the US).

Longing for an imaginary, better past often prevents us from making genuine improvements to our actual future. Don't do it.
 
2014-03-23 07:08:00 PM

machoprogrammer: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x764]

Ahh, Britain


Safe to say she'll never be a in demand leading lady....maybe bit parts here and there.

Don't a lot of young actors get tutoring on set? She'll probably end up going to college after GOT and she realizes there aren't many parts out there for below average females. (even British ones)
 
2014-03-23 07:29:19 PM

madgonad: Sadly she looks like a younger version of her mother,


And if the mother had been a successful actress since 12 what do YOU think she would look like now?

hint... not a lot like she does.
 
2014-03-23 07:56:54 PM

Clash City Farker: School is needed so you can get a good job so you can work to make money. If you already have a good job, school is not needed.

I just hope the mom thought here clever plan through considering the high death rate amongst Game of Thrones characters.


If that's all you think education is for, I pray that you don't vote.

(Personally, I'm with a lot of the farkers in this thread. As long as I can hire decent tutors so that my kid doesn't turn out to be an ignoramus, go for it, and combine that with learning all I can about how to prevent my kid from becoming one of those too-often-seen child star train wrecks.)
 
2014-03-23 09:37:59 PM

gadian: I actually thought the mom was being reasonable.  The kid is one of the biggest stars on one of the hottest shows, not auditioning for community plays on the weekend hoping to make it big.  Working and getting paid now can only help her education later, when she's really able to focus on it.  In contrast, I recall reading that the kids from Harry Pottter did quite well academically, but I'm not sure their schedules were like filming for TV.


The Harry Potter actors all had tutors paid by the production company.  They were working almost full-time they'd finish one movie and go right into pre-production on the next film, so they were going to school full-time as well.

Emma Watson went on to college but neither Rupert Grint nor Daniel Radcliffe did.
 
2014-03-23 10:57:48 PM

Mike Chewbacca: GungFu: machoprogrammer: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 634x764]

Ahh, Britain


Grab the cash quick, missy....your time in the limelight ain't gonna last very long.

#UK.Hot.No.Edukashun

The UK doesn't have a problem with casting ordinary-looking people to major roles. That's an American thing. For example, this is the actress in Broadchurch on the BBC:

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 454x255]

And in the US version she's been replaced with:
[content2.catalog.photos.msn.com image 266x400]

They kept David Tennant, though.


That is one of the reasons I prefer British drama. The set is populated by people, rather than by cookie-cutter, plastic-moulded barbie and ken types. In part I suspect that, because I am not required to suspend my disbelief to accept a world where everyone has DayGlo white teeth and a tan which makes their skin an smooth 230D-4 on the pantone chart, means I can suspend my disbelief about their dragons or the number of murders their small village has had (one a week? I'm moving to a new town).

And in the case of subby's question. I would be happy to support my daughter in an acting career if she had been given opportunities which made it look like a viable long-term career. Unfortunately, she hasn't, so instead I am going to have to support her as she attempts to get into medicine (which I suspect will be a bit more work for me over the next 12 months).
 
2014-03-24 07:28:31 AM
Am I the only one who thinks she's hot?
 
2014-03-24 11:44:24 AM

BarryTheMasterOfSandwich: Am I the only one who thinks she's hot?


Nope I am with you. Too bad we have to wait two more years for any nudity.
 
2014-03-24 12:52:52 PM

BarryTheMasterOfSandwich: Am I the only one who thinks she's hot?


I don't know that I'd say she's hot, but I can see a certain kind of potential unconventional beauty that she may or may not grow into.
 
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