If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(KMOV St. Louis)   Mother rushes to her special needs sons school to comfort him after he has a panic attack. Resulting in a lockdown and the mother arrested because? A) She had drugs on her, B) A teacher has a restraining order against her, or C) She didn't sign in   (kmov.com) divider line 49
    More: Asinine, St. Louis County, special needs, elementary schools  
•       •       •

6812 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Mar 2014 at 7:45 AM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-03-23 07:53:28 AM
8 votes:
This is what happens when you put fictitious fear-mongering bureaucracy before common sense.
2014-03-23 08:52:02 AM
4 votes:
FTFAs comment section, another parent from that school posts:

"First of all that is an out right lie. This mother son is ED Emotional Disturbed and is not Autistic. The teacher did not call frantically. This mother has been an issue every since her children have attended Walnut Grove. She has threaten to stab a mother and has had conflicts with another family which led to the police and the family having a meeting Wednesday. I feel the news needs to investigate before putting anything on the air. Next time check the background of the parent before believing anything they say. She knows school and district policy. All she had to do was stop by the office and sign in. Also her son went outside and played while the police escorted her out of the building. Also the students are on special permission to attend there."

So maybe there's a bit more to the story than simply "Gestapo school agents thwart freedom by arresting fledgling eagle's patriot-hero parent. - Maybe that's why the cops took the extraordinary step of arresting her. That teacher she "met" in the hall apparently called the cops after the mother blew past her and refused to sign in.
2014-03-23 08:36:34 AM
4 votes:
I won't say this is always the case, but I will say 'most of the time'....these things aren't as unreasonable as they seem.  It reminds me of the 'Man arrested for talking too long at a public meeting' headlines that were floating around....but when you actually see the full story - regardless of what side you agree with - have to admit that there was a lot more to the story.

I'd bet money that this lady is a frequent pain-in-the-ass to the staff.  Her special needs snowflake was emotional.  Not dying, not bleeding, not in need of medical attention....her kid was having a panic attack.  And, I'm willing to bet money that it isn't first time.  She even says she 'is a known parent'.  I'd imagine she has a long history of expecting special treatment.  She was there just two days before speaking to the principal about an 'unrelated issue'.

I'd also suspect that she'd be the first to raise hell if she found out someone else was allowed past the school's 'security procedures' designed to protect her special needs child.
2014-03-23 08:03:38 AM
4 votes:

Pichu0102: So why didn't principal dipshiat call off the police if the person was known, or at least tell the police that there was a mistake?

If they called her and were expecting her to come in, and not said anything when the police arrested her, well, they're idiots.

Of course, an uncomfortable problem here is that the local area thinks that these policies are necessary to protect their children. Either the people on the board are overly paranoid, or this school has problems already. I'd say those two explanations are the most likely, and both have their own set of unfortunate implications...


It sounds like a power play by somebody in the office. The mother mentioned being in the school office prior to this; she may have pissed them off then.
2014-03-23 08:00:50 AM
4 votes:
So why didn't principal dipshiat call off the police if the person was known, or at least tell the police that there was a mistake?

If they called her and were expecting her to come in, and not said anything when the police arrested her, well, they're idiots.

Of course, an uncomfortable problem here is that the local area thinks that these policies are necessary to protect their children. Either the people on the board are overly paranoid, or this school has problems already. I'd say those two explanations are the most likely, and both have their own set of unfortunate implications...
2014-03-23 08:00:24 AM
4 votes:

skozlaw: She was taken to the police station on trespassing charges but Williams said she is a known parent. In fact, she met with the principal on Wednesday about a separate issue.

Yea, that's a good reason you dumb twunt.

So, it's hard to judge since it's the typical "wah wah" crybaby story from a parent who did something stupid and then ran to whine about the consequences in the local media, but it sure sounds like this basically boils down to a simple matter of schools having increased security and this biatch feels like she's too special to have it apply to her like it would the rest of us.

Fark off you self-important jackass. I hope you get some jail time.


You've never had an emergency call about your child have you?

Every time I read a story like this I am glad my kids re grown and I don't have to deal with this fear mongering bullsh*t.
2014-03-23 07:56:17 AM
4 votes:
She was taken to the police station on trespassing charges but Williams said she is a known parent. In fact, she met with the principal on Wednesday about a separate issue.

Yea, that's a good reason you dumb twunt.

So, it's hard to judge since it's the typical "wah wah" crybaby story from a parent who did something stupid and then ran to whine about the consequences in the local media, but it sure sounds like this basically boils down to a simple matter of schools having increased security and this biatch feels like she's too special to have it apply to her like it would the rest of us.

Fark off you self-important jackass. I hope you get some jail time.
2014-03-23 08:46:19 AM
3 votes:
FTA: Michael is Williams' son and he suffers from Asperger's syndrome.

farm4.staticflickr.com
2014-03-23 08:11:15 AM
3 votes:

BumpInTheNight: Good, I don't want random possibly armed adults floating around the halls of my kids' school.  I don't care if they are a parent of a child there, follow the rules and identify yourself.  I especially don't care if you think your snowflake requires even more urgent attention then smart kids, back in the day darwinism would have ensured your blood line ended with you so stop biatching else we'll have to revisit that.


I hate to tell you this, but there aren't roving bands of armed adults just looking for the opportunity to infiltrate your snowflake's school solely for the opportunity to hunt him/her for sport.

It's hard to believe, I know.
2014-03-23 07:59:14 AM
3 votes:

timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.


There's only her side of the story, as usual. How much do you want to bet she intentionally ignored or was hostile to the front office when they tried to get her to follow the proper procedures and didn't bother to mention that part to the media?
2014-03-23 07:57:27 AM
3 votes:
If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.
2014-03-23 09:56:23 AM
2 votes:

RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: won't say this is always the case, but I will say 'most of the time'....these things aren't as unreasonable as they seem.  It reminds me of the 'Man arrested for talking too long at a public meeting' headlines that were floating around....but when you actually see the full story - regardless of what side you agree with - have to admit that there was a lot more to the story.

I'd bet money that this lady is a frequent pain-in-the-ass to the staff.  Her special needs snowflake was emotional.  Not dying, not bleeding, not in need of medical attention....her kid was having a panic attack.  And, I'm willing to bet money that it isn't first time.  She even says she 'is a known parent'.  I'd imagine she has a long history of expecting special treatment.  She was there just two days before speaking to the principal about an 'unrelated issue'.

I'd also suspect that she'd be the first to raise hell if she found out someone else was allowed past the school's 'security procedures' designed to protect her special needs child.

Totally possible, but also very well written conjecture.

Agreed 100% - but it's no different than the one sided story typically presented by the media.

I do have an additional criticism. You seem to be of the opinion that "bleeding" is a medical emergency (arbitrarily -- many superficial cuts are just that) but that "having a panic attack" is not. I disagree. Particularly when the individual having a panic attack suffers some form of mental disability or illness. These people are not subhuman, no matter how many attempts to push this narrative are made.

Panic attacks or mental health emergencies have long been brushed aside or swept under the rug. I would hope an intelligent person like yourself would not contribute to something which is currently, thankfully, in a state of change. And, as I said earlier, contextually, the professionals involved in this case (the teachers, and the princi ...


A 'medical emergency' is a specific thing, with a specific meaning.  This kid's panic attack wasn't a medical emergency.

That's not sweeping it under the rug or dismissing it.  Things can be really traumatic and really painful, without being medical emergencies.  When you say things like, 'Oh sure, you can quote medical literature to support your argument, but I don't care....' I don't think that makes me sound condescending or dismissive.  It makes me sound *right*.

Sure, it's an appeal to authority, but we're not arguing logical truths.  Your problem isn't with me, for using the correct terminology, your problem is with the medical field.  If they change their stance, I'll change mine, I'm just deferring to the standards established by the experts.

But, until then....this wasn't a medical emergency.
2014-03-23 09:54:55 AM
2 votes:

Astorix: As usual the hate piles on the mother of a special needs child. What is it about special needs children that brings out the ugliness of people?!

FFS


Why aren't people questioning the influx of 'special needs' children? What causes it?
No, I don't buy the 'better diagnosis' bullsh*t.
2014-03-23 09:32:16 AM
2 votes:

RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: won't say this is always the case, but I will say 'most of the time'....these things aren't as unreasonable as they seem.  It reminds me of the 'Man arrested for talking too long at a public meeting' headlines that were floating around....but when you actually see the full story - regardless of what side you agree with - have to admit that there was a lot more to the story.

I'd bet money that this lady is a frequent pain-in-the-ass to the staff.  Her special needs snowflake was emotional.  Not dying, not bleeding, not in need of medical attention....her kid was having a panic attack.  And, I'm willing to bet money that it isn't first time.  She even says she 'is a known parent'.  I'd imagine she has a long history of expecting special treatment.  She was there just two days before speaking to the principal about an 'unrelated issue'.

I'd also suspect that she'd be the first to raise hell if she found out someone else was allowed past the school's 'security procedures' designed to protect her special needs child.

Totally possible, but also very well written conjecture.

Agreed 100% - but it's no different than the one sided story typically presented by the media.

I do have an additional criticism. You seem to be of the opinion that "bleeding" is a medical emergency (arbitrarily -- many superficial cuts are just that) but that "having a panic attack" is not. I disagree. Particularly when the individual having a panic attack suffers some form of mental disability or illness. These people are not subhuman, no matter how many attempts to push this narrative are made.

Panic attacks or mental health emergencies have long been brushed aside or swept under the rug. I would hope an intelligent person like yourself would not contribute to something which is currently, thankfully, in a state of change. And, as I said earlier, contextually, the professionals involved in this case (the teachers, and the principal) were already well acq ...


A medical emergency is an injury or illness that is acute and poses an immediate risk to a person's life or long term health.

Not all cuts are medical emergencies.  But some cuts are medical emergencies.  If left untreated, is the kid at risk of dying or being permanently affected?  Yes - then it is a medical emergency.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_medical_emergencies

I know Wikipedia isn't the end-all source of answers, but they do list psychiatric medical emergencies....but they do not include panic attacks (assuming the kid was having a panic attack).

According to the Mayo Clinic, these are the possible side-effects of untreated panic *attacks*
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/panic-attacks/basics/c om plications/con-20020825

They aren't talking about one untreated panic attack, but a lifetime of them....
  Development of specific phobias, such as fear of driving or leaving your home
  Avoidance of social situations
  Problems at work or school
  Depression
  Increased risk of suicide or suicidal thoughts
  Alcohol or substance abuse
  Financial problems

None of these are immediate problems that would constitute a medical emergency.  Time was not 'of the essence'.  The kid was not in danger of death or dismemberment.  An ambulance wasn't called, he didn't need medical treatment.
2014-03-23 09:26:22 AM
2 votes:
Rules...i remember carrying a screaming woman into the E.R. Her insides were exploding with a bad pregnancy...i mean she was screaming uncontrollably in obvious pain of 20a on a scale of 10. Desk lady told her to have a seat for paperwork...i said, you do some paperwork i'm going back to the doctors and nurses...the said she could have died if we waited longer...should i have followed the rules and let her die?
2014-03-23 08:29:02 AM
2 votes:
I have to agree with Pichu.

The local elementary has been basically terrorizing my youngest for six months. We had no proof. They sent her home on 2/19 with red fingermarks in her armpits, petechia, and a bruise on her back. CPS did NOTHING. The police did NOTHING. She's 8. She weighs 59lbs. Multiple issues. The worst she usually does is cry that the cafeteria ran out of pancakes, or not stop talking about MLP.

What did the school do? They called an IEP meeting to change our kid's placement and tried to blame it on her rubbing her back against a chair or some nonsense. (No, no clue how that would affect her armpits).  Their response to our kid getting hurt was to retaliate.

/we pulled her out after she came home with the injuries. Homeschooling for now, and trying to sell our house and move. There isn't another choice. An attorney for a due process case here is $$$$$$. We tried to work within the system and thought they were just clueless in the beginning. No. It's designed.
//yes, I'm very bitter right now
///not enough rum in the world
////maybe not enough slashies either
2014-03-23 08:18:38 AM
2 votes:
Sounds like she is a special needs parent.
2014-03-23 08:12:56 AM
2 votes:

JoieD'Zen: Pichu0102: So why didn't principal dipshiat call off the police if the person was known, or at least tell the police that there was a mistake?

If they called her and were expecting her to come in, and not said anything when the police arrested her, well, they're idiots.

Of course, an uncomfortable problem here is that the local area thinks that these policies are necessary to protect their children. Either the people on the board are overly paranoid, or this school has problems already. I'd say those two explanations are the most likely, and both have their own set of unfortunate implications...

It sounds like a power play by somebody in the office. The mother mentioned being in the school office prior to this; she may have pissed them off then.


That also is a possibility. Another one is someone in the office hates the kid and is trying to get them to leave by getting the parent arrested and having CPS take away the child or just force the family to move to get away from that school.
2014-03-23 08:12:10 AM
2 votes:

skozlaw: timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.

There's only her side of the story, as usual. How much do you want to bet she intentionally ignored or was hostile to the front office when they tried to get her to follow the proper procedures and didn't bother to mention that part to the media?


Well, since most schools only have one way in during the day now, and that way has a staff member manning it, I suspect you may be right. I'm sure different school districts have different policies, but there is no way into my kid's school without going right past someone who can sign you in. If you just blow past that person, you are in for trouble.
2014-03-23 08:08:17 AM
2 votes:

JoieD'Zen: You've never had an emergency call about your child have you?


"When it's MY kid I shouldn't HAVE to follow the rules!"

Right.
2014-03-23 08:07:38 AM
2 votes:

skozlaw: timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.

There's only her side of the story, as usual. How much do you want to bet she intentionally ignored or was hostile to the front office when they tried to get her to follow the proper procedures and didn't bother to mention that part to the media?


It couldn't surprise me in the least. I firmly believe that this Snowflake Generation doesn't actually exist, but what we really have is a bunch of parents in the Self-Important-Jackass Cohort.
2014-03-23 08:02:18 AM
2 votes:
Good, I don't want random possibly armed adults floating around the halls of my kids' school.  I don't care if they are a parent of a child there, follow the rules and identify yourself.  I especially don't care if you think your snowflake requires even more urgent attention then smart kids, back in the day darwinism would have ensured your blood line ended with you so stop biatching else we'll have to revisit that.
2014-03-23 07:55:54 AM
2 votes:
At least the cops didn't shoot the crap out of her. They're getting soft.
GBB [TotalFark]
2014-03-23 07:52:28 AM
2 votes:

skwerl: Zero tolerance. Follow the rules, citizen.


Yup.  And when a school administrator makes a minor error, there is zero tolerance against them by parents, too.

Funny how that works.
2014-03-23 07:52:28 AM
2 votes:
Pretty stupid.  The school should apologize to the parent and put it behind them.
2014-03-23 07:48:54 AM
2 votes:
Zero tolerance. Follow the rules, citizen.
2014-03-23 08:30:38 PM
1 votes:

shortymac: I also suggest you anally record EVERYTHING: every injury, every letter/e-mail (no phone calls, get everything in writing), bring a tape recorder into meetings, etc. You will feel a little insane but you are entering a kafkaesque maze of hell and anal documentation is the only thing that will safe you.


So, anal then.
2014-03-23 03:09:57 PM
1 votes:

FnkyTwn: FTFAs comment section, another parent from that school posts:

"First of all that is an out right lie. This mother son is ED Emotional Disturbed and is not Autistic. The teacher did not call frantically. This mother has been an issue every since her children have attended Walnut Grove. She has threaten to stab a mother and has had conflicts with another family which led to the police and the family having a meeting Wednesday. I feel the news needs to investigate before putting anything on the air. Next time check the background of the parent before believing anything they say. She knows school and district policy. All she had to do was stop by the office and sign in. Also her son went outside and played while the police escorted her out of the building. Also the students are on special permission to attend there."

So maybe there's a bit more to the story than simply "Gestapo school agents thwart freedom by arresting fledgling eagle's patriot-hero parent. - Maybe that's why the cops took the extraordinary step of arresting her. That teacher she "met" in the hall apparently called the cops after the mother blew past her and refused to sign in.


Or that could be a fabricated lie.
2014-03-23 02:39:35 PM
1 votes:
Are there seriously people so retarded that they think calling a parent and requesting they come to school because their special needs child is having a bit of a personal crisis and then arresting them because they come is a good idea?

School employees called her and asked her to come. School employees buzzed her into the building and recognized her when they did. The principal recognized her when she came to the classroom.

Yet they still had police arrest her? If you are that incapable of good judgement, you have no business being in charge of children.
2014-03-23 02:07:29 PM
1 votes:

JoieD'Zen: skozlaw: She was taken to the police station on trespassing charges but Williams said she is a known parent. In fact, she met with the principal on Wednesday about a separate issue.

Yea, that's a good reason you dumb twunt.

So, it's hard to judge since it's the typical "wah wah" crybaby story from a parent who did something stupid and then ran to whine about the consequences in the local media, but it sure sounds like this basically boils down to a simple matter of schools having increased security and this biatch feels like she's too special to have it apply to her like it would the rest of us.

Fark off you self-important jackass. I hope you get some jail time.

You've never had an emergency call about your child have you?

Every time I read a story like this I am glad my kids re grown and I don't have to deal with this fear mongering bullsh*t.


I have two kids in grade school. I've received the standard number of sick/problem calls over the years. It takes about 30 seconds to go by the office. And everyone at the school know any adult without an ID card or a little printed sticker on their left breast (there's your 30 seconds) does not belong there. It's a very efficient way to ensure safety. The fact that there are no exceptions ensures the safety part.

She should not have been arrested when the cops got there if she explained herself rationally but the odds are high she's a crazy entitled psycho who had pushed the limits many times before and she overstepped them this time.
2014-03-23 02:01:25 PM
1 votes:
Also - for anyone claiming it was a medical emergency - why is nobody complaining that 911 wasn't called?
2014-03-23 10:32:33 AM
1 votes:
It's not too difficult to check in, and you can save the school a mandatory emergency response.
2014-03-23 10:18:28 AM
1 votes:

Eve L. Koont: ^Agree 100%. When you have to quote from the interwebs just stfu instead.


I think that's really sad, honestly.  I guess maybe ignorance really is bliss?

What is the alternative you would recommend?

Perhaps you dislike when people quote sources for their claims, because you frequently find yourself arguing positions without supporting sources?
2014-03-23 10:11:40 AM
1 votes:

RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: won't say this is always the case, but I will say 'most of the time'....these things aren't as unreasonable as they seem.  It reminds me of the 'Man arrested for talking too long at a public meeting' headlines that were floating around....but when you actually see the full story - regardless of what side you agree with - have to admit that there was a lot more to the story.

I'd bet money that this lady is a frequent pain-in-the-ass to the staff.  Her special needs snowflake was emotional.  Not dying, not bleeding, not in need of medical attention....her kid was having a panic attack.  And, I'm willing to bet money that it isn't first time.  She even says she 'is a known parent'.  I'd imagine she has a long history of expecting special treatment.  She was there just two days before speaking to the principal about an 'unrelated issue'.

I'd also suspect that she'd be the first to raise hell if she found out someone else was allowed past the school's 'security procedures' designed to protect her special needs child.

Totally possible, but also very well written conjecture.

Agreed 100% - but it's no different than the one sided story typically presented by the media.

I do have an additional criticism. You seem to be of the opinion that "bleeding" is a medical emergency (arbitrarily -- many superficial cuts are just that) but that "having a panic attack" is not. I disagree. Particularly when the individual having a panic attack suffers some form of mental disability or illness. These people are not subhuman, no matter how many attempts to push this narrative are made.

Panic attacks or mental health emergencies have long been brushed aside or swept under the rug. I would hope an intelligent person like yourself would not contribute to something which is currently, thankfully, in a state of change. And, as I said earlier, contextually, the professionals involved in this case (th ...


Sure - I'll continue 'parroting' by using the accepted meanings of words.  And you can continue to 'innovate' your own meanings as you see fit.  That's totally cool.  But it's pretty unrealistic to expect the rest of the world to pick up on how you think words should be.  Lots of people are going to continue to 'parrot' the actual meanings.
2014-03-23 09:54:19 AM
1 votes:
i1207.photobucket.com

a few months in an iso-cube, to cool her heels, ought to do the trick.
GBB [TotalFark]
2014-03-23 09:36:28 AM
1 votes:

Close2TheEdge: GBB: skwerl: Zero tolerance. Follow the rules, citizen.

Yup.  And when a school administrator makes a minor error, there is zero tolerance against them by parents, too.

Funny how that works.

That's just it.  The school administrator was following procedure correctly.  Do the need to apologize?  No.  Should they?  Yes, because there is no way they can win the PR shiatstorm this will generate.


I don't think the school should apologize 1 bit.
If a parent comes into the school and doesn't sign in, then it's the administrator's word against the parent's on whether or not they were actually there.  Bending the rules for her means bending the rules for every parent and that's when mistakes happen and a jealous or vindictive ex-husband/wife ends up kidnapping their own child against court orders.  And every single time that happens, an administrator is thrown under the bus.  Admin did their part and notified law enforcement because a parent breached protocol and failed to sign in when and where they were supposed to.

Now, should law enforcement have arrested her?  Probably not.  That's going a bit far.  Law enforcement could have written a 30 second report that they were called to the scene and checked that everything was fine.  But then again, law enforcement falls under the same, if not more intense, scrutiny than public school administrators.

The average person always wants everyone else to follow the rules to the tee, but wants everyone else to be understanding when they want to break those same rules.
2014-03-23 09:35:12 AM
1 votes:
If "zero tolerance" really is such a great thing, why bother with school administrators in the first place?  There's no point teaching people to act like machines when actual machines are cheaper & more reliable.  Just replace the administrators a computer & be done with it.

if (entry) and (not sign_in):
  call_police()
else:
  idle()


There, 2 lines of code and I just saved the school district $75k/year on someone's salary.
2014-03-23 09:27:19 AM
1 votes:

Abox: "I saw a teacher and she said Ms. Williams what is wrong? I said something is wrong with Mikey and proceeded to go straight to my son," said Williams

Yeah something tells me this piece didn't go down quite this way..


I suspect she's conveniently leaving out the 40 decibels, the 5 swear words in the sentence directed at the teacher, and possibly an elbow or two.
2014-03-23 09:17:30 AM
1 votes:

Eve L. Koont: Pichu0102: So why didn't principal dipshiat call off the police if the person was known, or at least tell the police that there was a mistake?

If they called her and were expecting her to come in, and not said anything when the police arrested her, well, they're idiots.

Of course, an uncomfortable problem here is that the local area thinks that these policies are necessary to protect their children. Either the people on the board are overly paranoid, or this school has problems already. I'd say those two explanations are the most likely, and both have their own set of unfortunate implications...

How about NOT buzzing the person in and giving them access to the building and everyone inside unless you know who the fark they are??

How the fark does signing a book keep kids safe? If they buzzed her in I hope to fark they knew who she was or the fault is on them.

They called her. They buzzed her in. And, they still had the stones to have her arrested?? Seriously?


There school might be different, but at my elementary school, it wasn't built with security in mind.  It's not a prison.  The buzz-in system is, essentially, 'The person isn't obviously intoxicated, nude, carrying guns or barrels of explosives'.  Being 'buzzed in' just meant the door unlocked.  They didn't collect IDs, nobody was stationed in a 'pre-access area' to do authorizations.

There were signs, and the policy was, upon entering the building you needed to go straight across the hall into the main office where the lady operating the buzzer was sitting, and 'sign-in'.  You'd need to say who you were and why you were there.

So, being 'buzzed in' did NOT mean they knew the person.  Just that the person was not an immediate, obvious threat.  And nothing stopped someone who was buzzed in from running down the hallway without going into the office first.  The receptionist/office worker just had a crappy old camera and a button to unlock the door.  If they let someone in and saw them run down the hall, they are supposed to call the police.  Most schools are made up of lots of employees.  It almost certainly wasn't the lady at the desk who called her.

Imagine you work at a school.  Part of your job is to let in visitors.  If you let someone in and they don't immediately follow the signs and come up to you, you are SUPPOSED to call the police and start the lock-down.  Because it could be a crazy person.

So you ring in a lady who immediately runs down the hall.  What do you do?  Hit the panic button, because that is your job.
2014-03-23 09:09:28 AM
1 votes:

Eve L. Koont: How the fark does signing a book keep kids safe AFTER the person is buzzed in?? Do they check ID or something before they buzz a person in??


Schools have been implementing, little by little, a system called Raptr. It actually physically scans valid US ids and matches them against a database of sex offenders and others.
2014-03-23 09:09:01 AM
1 votes:

Abox: RockofAges: People who hide behind "the rules" are pathetic cowards. My priorities in life are such that "the rules" land pretty low down on the list

Ugh...I work with people like this and they are pretty much responsible for everything that goes wrong.


I guess I'm one of the "please follow the rules" people at work. Frankly, people who don't make me insane.

We have rules about where you document any changes you make on a server, including passwords. We have rules about what you can and can't tell a client and rules about how to document any defects you find in our product. When people don't follow these rules, it usually results in me having to do twice as much work trying to figure out what the hell the last analyst did. I guess the last person figured rules are for squares.

Having said that, sure I'd like to punch the guy in the face who complains about which parking lot I parked in or whether or not my shoes are too casual for business casual. Of course, I wouldn't actually punch him in the face. There are rules against that.

/rules
2014-03-23 09:00:22 AM
1 votes:

FnkyTwn: FTFAs comment section, another parent from that school posts:

"First of all that is an out right lie. This mother son is ED Emotional Disturbed and is not Autistic. The teacher did not call frantically. This mother has been an issue every since her children have attended Walnut Grove. She has threaten to stab a mother and has had conflicts with another family which led to the police and the family having a meeting Wednesday. I feel the news needs to investigate before putting anything on the air. Next time check the background of the parent before believing anything they say. She knows school and district policy. All she had to do was stop by the office and sign in. Also her son went outside and played while the police escorted her out of the building. Also the students are on special permission to attend there."

So maybe there's a bit more to the story than simply "Gestapo school agents thwart freedom by arresting fledgling eagle's patriot-hero parent. - Maybe that's why the cops took the extraordinary step of arresting her. That teacher she "met" in the hall apparently called the cops after the mother blew past her and refused to sign in.


Well, that pretty much matches my expectations spot on.  Naturally, she'll do her best to be the victim and the media will gladly play their part because it's a far more interesting story.
2014-03-23 08:56:46 AM
1 votes:
How the fark does signing a book keep kids safe AFTER the person is buzzed in?? Do they check ID or something before they buzz a person in??
2014-03-23 08:50:45 AM
1 votes:
If she's black, then this would all make sense .
2014-03-23 08:47:34 AM
1 votes:

skozlaw: JoieD'Zen: You've never had an emergency call about your child have you?

"When it's MY kid I shouldn't HAVE to follow the rules!"

Right.


THIS. if she had assaulted a teacher or student, the school officials would have been raked over the coals for letting her in without signing in.
2014-03-23 08:32:20 AM
1 votes:

RavenOnyx: I have to agree with Pichu.

The local elementary has been basically terrorizing my youngest for six months. We had no proof. They sent her home on 2/19 with red fingermarks in her armpits, petechia, and a bruise on her back. CPS did NOTHING. The police did NOTHING. She's 8. She weighs 59lbs. Multiple issues. The worst she usually does is cry that the cafeteria ran out of pancakes, or not stop talking about MLP.

What did the school do? They called an IEP meeting to change our kid's placement and tried to blame it on her rubbing her back against a chair or some nonsense. (No, no clue how that would affect her armpits).  Their response to our kid getting hurt was to retaliate.

/we pulled her out after she came home with the injuries. Homeschooling for now, and trying to sell our house and move. There isn't another choice. An attorney for a due process case here is $$$$$$. We tried to work within the system and thought they were just clueless in the beginning. No. It's designed.
//yes, I'm very bitter right now
///not enough rum in the world
////maybe not enough slashies either


What?
2014-03-23 08:25:38 AM
1 votes:
"I saw a teacher and she said Ms. Williams what is wrong? I said something is wrong with Mikey and proceeded to go straight to my son," said Williams

Yeah something tells me this piece didn't go down quite this way..
2014-03-23 08:10:33 AM
1 votes:

skozlaw: JoieD'Zen: You've never had an emergency call about your child have you?

"When it's MY kid I shouldn't HAVE to follow the rules!"

Right.


Bullshiat, it wouldn't matter if a kid is having an emergency or not. The rules are always for other people.
2014-03-23 08:01:05 AM
1 votes:
Oh good.  They're starting to eat their own.

Maybe now this bullshiat will change.
 
Displayed 49 of 49 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report