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(KMOV St. Louis)   Mother rushes to her special needs sons school to comfort him after he has a panic attack. Resulting in a lockdown and the mother arrested because? A) She had drugs on her, B) A teacher has a restraining order against her, or C) She didn't sign in   (kmov.com) divider line 223
    More: Asinine, St. Louis County, special needs, elementary schools  
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6824 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Mar 2014 at 7:45 AM (30 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-23 02:29:21 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: stonelotus: am I the only one who sees a resemblance to the original Donkey Kong in that picture?

i1207.photobucket.com

[that'sracist.jpg]


yeah, not really.  GIS the original game.  the colors sort of match (orange, blue, brown), the stern look on his face, the hand gesture, numbers in the background like a score.
 
2014-03-23 02:34:40 PM  

Eve L. Koont: Big_Doofus: This woman is a known pain in the ass at the school. From the comments below the actual story someone said she had threatened to stab a staff member or another parent. That's what the Wednesday meeting was all about. You have to remember, she called the tv station to air her grievances. The school really isn't allowed to comment much.

I'm not saying it was right or wrong, just trying to give a little context.

That is either made up, hearsay and rumor, or straight from the mouth of someone who works at the school.

If it's the latter, they're not very smart as you are not supposed to divulge any information that would be in the child's file (the reason for a visit, etc). You can't take a comment and run with it like you did as if it's the known truth, especially when that comment sounds as if someone who works at the school wrote it, therefore setting themselves up for a lawsuit.


I have several neighborhood friends/acquaintances who teach at local schools. Everyone at the school knows about every shiatty or great parent. It's the never ending center of water cooler banter.
 
2014-03-23 02:39:35 PM  
Are there seriously people so retarded that they think calling a parent and requesting they come to school because their special needs child is having a bit of a personal crisis and then arresting them because they come is a good idea?

School employees called her and asked her to come. School employees buzzed her into the building and recognized her when they did. The principal recognized her when she came to the classroom.

Yet they still had police arrest her? If you are that incapable of good judgement, you have no business being in charge of children.
 
2014-03-23 02:41:17 PM  

bborchar: RavenOnyx: I have to agree with Pichu.

The local elementary has been basically terrorizing my youngest for six months. We had no proof. They sent her home on 2/19 with red fingermarks in her armpits, petechia, and a bruise on her back. CPS did NOTHING. The police did NOTHING. She's 8. She weighs 59lbs. Multiple issues. The worst she usually does is cry that the cafeteria ran out of pancakes, or not stop talking about MLP.

What did the school do? They called an IEP meeting to change our kid's placement and tried to blame it on her rubbing her back against a chair or some nonsense. (No, no clue how that would affect her armpits).  Their response to our kid getting hurt was to retaliate.

/we pulled her out after she came home with the injuries. Homeschooling for now, and trying to sell our house and move. There isn't another choice. An attorney for a due process case here is $$$$$$. We tried to work within the system and thought they were just clueless in the beginning. No. It's designed.
//yes, I'm very bitter right now
///not enough rum in the world
////maybe not enough slashies either

My son has a language delay, and I received an email from his preschool teacher saying that he has been acting out in class and they don't know how to control him.  Here's the catch:

He's 2.  And the class is for 2 year olds.

She also described all sorts of negative behaviors (like that he doesn't 'acknowledge her presence or look at her when she talks to him') and that he starts screaming and throws himself on the floor.  This does NOT sound anything like my son at all, and he has a speech therapist who says that he is absolutely great when she's there.  The therapist and I have come to the conclusion that the teacher doesn't like him and he doesn't like her...he's never ignored anyone else the way the teacher says he ignores her.

I am currently looking for a new preschool, because I'll be damned if one stupid teacher ruins school for my son when he's 2 years old.  I tried talking to the director, but she was hellbent on defending the teacher's actions.  I seriously hope this isn't something I have to deal with when we reach elementary school, but I'm not optimistic because the school bureaucracy is ridiculous.


My son had a caregiver somewhat like that. We moved him and he's never had a problem in the seven years since.
 
2014-03-23 02:44:02 PM  

Eve L. Koont: alice_600: addy2: Eve L. Koont: How the fark does signing a book keep kids safe AFTER the person is buzzed in?? Do they check ID or something before they buzz a person in??

Thank you. Especially since they already know her by sight. Even with her possible history what the hell is signing going to do?

It's to keep a record of who comes and who goes in at what time or whatever.  It's case someone who doesn't know her face comes in posing as her or her "husband" or a "family member". Also if someone hears about it on a police scanner and in the chaos comes in as the above or as a cop or a therapist and leaves with $200,000 worth of equipment. They got their fingerprints and their signatures as well as the time they came in.

Okay, but they buzzed her in. What I'm wondering is if there's any sort of vetting process before they allow that person inside the school by buzzing them in?

Do they show ID to a school official at the door or something? I would think that (or something similar) would be the optimal way to make sure those that don't need to be inside don't get inside and the parent/guardian could also sign in right there after entering the door.


A lot of people keep saying "buzzing in". None of my kids three schools has ever had that. You just walk in and go to the office. Is that a really common thin now? Is it regional? Only in well off or poor districts? Just curious....
 
2014-03-23 03:09:46 PM  

RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: RockofAges: Fark_Guy_Rob: won't say this is always the case, but I will say 'most of the time'....these things aren't as unreasonable as they seem.  It reminds me of the 'Man arrested for talking too long at a public meeting' headlines that were floating around....but when you actually see the full story - regardless of what side you agree with - have to admit that there was a lot more to the story.

I'd bet money that this lady is a frequent pain-in-the-ass to the staff.  Her special needs snowflake was emotional.  Not dying, not bleeding, not in need of medical attention....her kid was having a panic attack.  And, I'm willing to bet money that it isn't first time.  She even says she 'is a known parent'.  I'd imagine she has a long history of expecting special treatment.  She was there just two days before speaking to the principal about an 'unrelated issue'.

I'd also suspect that she'd be the first to raise hell if she found out someone else was allowed past the school's 'security procedures' designed to protect her special needs child.

Totally possible, but also very well written conjecture.

Agreed 100% - but it's no different than the one sided story typically presented by the media.

I do have an additional criticism. You seem to be of the opinion that "bleeding" is a medical emergency (arbitrarily -- many superficial cuts are just that) but that "having a panic attack" is not. I disagree. Particularly when the individual having a panic attack suffers some form of mental disability or illness. These people are not subhuman, no matter how many attempts to push this narrative are made.

Panic attacks or mental health emergencies have long been brushed aside or swept under the rug. I would hope an intelligent person like yourself would not contribute to something which is currently, thankfully, in a state of change. And, as I said earlier, contextually, the professionals involved in this case (the teachers, and the principal) were already well acquainted both with the student and the mother.


Yup. Having had panic attacks of varying degrees, I can say that some of them can definitely be considered emergencies. Especially if you're in school. Hyperventilating and crying and generally freaking out are going to terrify the other kids and make you an excellent target for bullies, and it's really something you should leave for if at all possible.

/thankfully, mine didn't start until college, so I was able to sob uncontrollably in the privacy of my own dorm room
 
2014-03-23 03:09:57 PM  

FnkyTwn: FTFAs comment section, another parent from that school posts:

"First of all that is an out right lie. This mother son is ED Emotional Disturbed and is not Autistic. The teacher did not call frantically. This mother has been an issue every since her children have attended Walnut Grove. She has threaten to stab a mother and has had conflicts with another family which led to the police and the family having a meeting Wednesday. I feel the news needs to investigate before putting anything on the air. Next time check the background of the parent before believing anything they say. She knows school and district policy. All she had to do was stop by the office and sign in. Also her son went outside and played while the police escorted her out of the building. Also the students are on special permission to attend there."

So maybe there's a bit more to the story than simply "Gestapo school agents thwart freedom by arresting fledgling eagle's patriot-hero parent. - Maybe that's why the cops took the extraordinary step of arresting her. That teacher she "met" in the hall apparently called the cops after the mother blew past her and refused to sign in.


Or that could be a fabricated lie.
 
2014-03-23 03:26:35 PM  
When I was working with kids, we would occasionally get copies of court orders suspending or terminating the parental rights of one parent, or a restraining order preventing a parent from contacting their child. It was up to the front desk staff to screen parents coming in, for just this reason. Otherwise, parents were free to drop in and spend time with their kid whenever they liked. In case of emergency, we would contact a parent, and leave it to their discretion as to whether to come in and take the child home or to the hospital, or to permit us to call an ambulance, if needed.

In the position I was in, I was privy to a lot of information about a kid's family life, and about a lot of things their parents were going through. I have no doubt that the school administration was in the same position in this case. If there's an emergency, and you recognize a parent as someone legally permitted to be there during an emergency, you let them deal with the emergency, and work out the bureaucratic details later. "That's policy," is the last cowardly refuge of the bureaucrat; ask them why that's the policy, and nine times out of ten, they can't tell you.
 
2014-03-23 03:31:49 PM  

skwerl: Zero tolerance. Follow the rules, citizen.


And if it wasn't the mom on campus?
 
2014-03-23 03:32:26 PM  

GBB: skwerl: Zero tolerance. Follow the rules, citizen.

Yup.  And when a school administrator makes a minor error, there is zero tolerance against them by parents, too.

Funny how that works.


This
 
2014-03-23 03:34:18 PM  

AngryDragon: BumpInTheNight: Good, I don't want random possibly armed adults floating around the halls of my kids' school.  I don't care if they are a parent of a child there, follow the rules and identify yourself.  I especially don't care if you think your snowflake requires even more urgent attention then smart kids, back in the day darwinism would have ensured your blood line ended with you so stop biatching else we'll have to revisit that.

I hate to tell you this, but there aren't roving bands of armed adults just looking for the opportunity to infiltrate your snowflake's school solely for the opportunity to hunt him/her for sport.

It's hard to believe, I know.


True. But the one time there is, the school admin will be asked why they didn't stop it.

So they have to react like every unknown person might be.
 
2014-03-23 03:35:47 PM  

shtychkn: skwerl: Zero tolerance. Follow the rules, citizen.

And if it wasn't the mom on campus?


You're aware that the school actually called her to tell her there was a problem, right?  Of course you are.
 
2014-03-23 03:36:10 PM  

teenage mutant ninja rapist: School admins are just like police. The whole lot of them should be on the unemployment line.

time to start from scratch. Hire new and start again.

how many farkers here want anybody involved in this story teaching their kids?


Anyone would end up doing the same thing because of great of being sued that school Admin lives under.
 
2014-03-23 03:39:02 PM  

Stoker: There's a difference between...
"Principle, a parent neglected to sign in and is going to see her son in room 222"
"Principle, there's a person carrying something that looks like a gun"

One of those deserves calling the cops, the other a stern warning about the rules.


Well. Many schools have police on campus. No special call needed.

Second. If the random adult on campus with our checking in turns out to be someone who means harm to the kids the admin will lose Thier jobs. Kids may be hurt and the admin may be sued.

So for the admin, better to err on getting the police involved.
 
2014-03-23 03:44:08 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: noitsnot: Fark_Guy_Rob: Eve L. Koont: Fark_Guy_Rob: Eve L. Koont: thurstonxhowell: Eve L. Koont: ^Agree 100%. When you have to quote from the interwebs just stfu instead.

The only reason for your post to exist is a "quote from the interwebs". You added nothing of value to it.

But playing internet doctor and acting as if you know all from reading a few pages of text and think of yourself as some hot shiat expert does what? On fark it makes you fit in well apparently.


You've been caught with your pants down and you should either admit it or walk away.

Panic attack is a real medical thing with real medical symptoms.  It not just "somebody watched a scary movie and they're freaking out".

My pants are up.

I claimed it was not a medical emergency.  It isn't.

That doesn't mean it's not a 'real medical thing'.  Wikipedia and the Mayo clinic agree.  The kid was not in immediate danger.



No, here's what you first said:

" Her special needs snowflake was emotional.  Not dying, not bleeding, not in need of medical attention....her kid was having a panic attack. "

You framed it as:

  1) Emotional
  2) Not a cause for medical attention

Both are untrue of a panic attack. Then your position kinda... morphed as the thread continued.
 
2014-03-23 03:50:39 PM  

timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.


She didn't go barging in - they buzzed her in, meaning they electronically unlocked the door and allowed her to enter. She went straight to her kid's room instead of going to the office and signing a visitor book. Her kid had an emergency, and the school official who called the cops should be fired.
 
2014-03-23 04:03:04 PM  

AngryDragon: shtychkn: skwerl: Zero tolerance. Follow the rules, citizen.

And if it wasn't the mom on campus?

You're aware that the school actually called her to tell her there was a problem, right?  Of course you are.


And that means everyone at the school knows who she is and that there is no possible way some one else could walk onto campus at the same time.

And if course, if or wad an assailant, other patents would have excused admin for not calling the police because they d understand.
 
2014-03-23 04:05:49 PM  

happydude45: timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.

She didn't go barging in - they buzzed her in, meaning they electronically unlocked the door and allowed her to enter. She went straight to her kid's room instead of going to the office and signing a visitor book. Her kid had an emergency, and the school official who called the cops should be fired.


So they buzzed an unidentified person into the building who went straight for the children instead of identifying themselves.
 
2014-03-23 04:07:25 PM  

Lee451: skozlaw: JoieD'Zen: You've never had an emergency call about your child have you?

"When it's MY kid I shouldn't HAVE to follow the rules!"

Right.

THIS. if she had assaulted a teacher or student, the school officials would have been raked over the coals for letting her in without signing in.


If she had assaulted someone, THEN it would be time to call the police. She didn't sign in. So what? They knew who she was and they were able to talk to her faster than the police could get there.

Granted the story is one-sided, but if it's accurate, the school made an indefensible decision.
 
2014-03-23 04:08:29 PM  
Calling the police doesn't have to result in an arrest. The police officers choose to arrest her. Why?
 
2014-03-23 04:13:05 PM  

shtychkn: happydude45: timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.

She didn't go barging in - they buzzed her in, meaning they electronically unlocked the door and allowed her to enter. She went straight to her kid's room instead of going to the office and signing a visitor book. Her kid had an emergency, and the school official who called the cops should be fired.

So they buzzed an unidentified person into the building who went straight for the children instead of identifying themselves.


She got an emergency call from the SCHOOL TEACHER. They were expecting her.
 
2014-03-23 04:19:30 PM  

happydude45: shtychkn: happydude45: timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.

She didn't go barging in - they buzzed her in, meaning they electronically unlocked the door and allowed her to enter. She went straight to her kid's room instead of going to the office and signing a visitor book. Her kid had an emergency, and the school official who called the cops should be fired.

So they buzzed an unidentified person into the building who went straight for the children instead of identifying themselves.

She got an emergency call from the SCHOOL TEACHER. They were expecting her.


The teacher was expecting her, but the folks at the front might not have been.
 
2014-03-23 04:24:19 PM  

happydude45: shtychkn: happydude45: timswar: If some random hysterical woman went barging into my son's school I'd want her arrested. My question is why the asst. principal wasn't already on top of the situation and meeting her at the classroom with the sign in form. This sounds like a result of poor communication between the teacher and the front office.

She didn't go barging in - they buzzed her in, meaning they electronically unlocked the door and allowed her to enter. She went straight to her kid's room instead of going to the office and signing a visitor book. Her kid had an emergency, and the school official who called the cops should be fired.

So they buzzed an unidentified person into the building who went straight for the children instead of identifying themselves.

She got an emergency call from the SCHOOL TEACHER. They were expecting her.


But they didn't know it was her.
 
2014-03-23 04:28:02 PM  
The admin followed the rule book. Should employees not follow rules?
 
2014-03-23 04:31:33 PM  

Freschel: FnkyTwn: FTFAs comment section, another parent from that school posts:

"First of all that is an out right lie. This mother son is ED Emotional Disturbed and is not Autistic. The teacher did not call frantically. This mother has been an issue every since her children have attended Walnut Grove. She has threaten to stab a mother and has had conflicts with another family which led to the police and the family having a meeting Wednesday. I feel the news needs to investigate before putting anything on the air. Next time check the background of the parent before believing anything they say. She knows school and district policy. All she had to do was stop by the office and sign in. Also her son went outside and played while the police escorted her out of the building. Also the students are on special permission to attend there."

So maybe there's a bit more to the story than simply "Gestapo school agents thwart freedom by arresting fledgling eagle's patriot-hero parent. - Maybe that's why the cops took the extraordinary step of arresting her. That teacher she "met" in the hall apparently called the cops after the mother blew past her and refused to sign in.

Or that could be a fabricated lie.


Cue Giorgio with the Centauri hair...

If someone came forth and verified that she did NOT get a call from the school, and instead came in on her own, then, yeah, the lady's story falls apart and she's batshiat who broke into the school.

But they called her and buzzed her in? Especially with the history stated? Something's not adding up.

I remember a kid got suspended for holding a door open for someone they recognized with parcels in their arms. "Just buzzing in" isn't cutting it.

And the teacher who called? No communication to the front desk/administratiion?
 
2014-03-23 04:37:36 PM  

OtherLittleGuy: Freschel: FnkyTwn: FTFAs comment section, another parent from that school posts:

"First of all that is an out right lie. This mother son is ED Emotional Disturbed and is not Autistic. The teacher did not call frantically. This mother has been an issue every since her children have attended Walnut Grove. She has threaten to stab a mother and has had conflicts with another family which led to the police and the family having a meeting Wednesday. I feel the news needs to investigate before putting anything on the air. Next time check the background of the parent before believing anything they say. She knows school and district policy. All she had to do was stop by the office and sign in. Also her son went outside and played while the police escorted her out of the building. Also the students are on special permission to attend there."

So maybe there's a bit more to the story than simply "Gestapo school agents thwart freedom by arresting fledgling eagle's patriot-hero parent. - Maybe that's why the cops took the extraordinary step of arresting her. That teacher she "met" in the hall apparently called the cops after the mother blew past her and refused to sign in.

Or that could be a fabricated lie.

Cue Giorgio with the Centauri hair...

If someone came forth and verified that she did NOT get a call from the school, and instead came in on her own, then, yeah, the lady's story falls apart and she's batshiat who broke into the school.

But they called her and buzzed her in? Especially with the history stated? Something's not adding up.

I remember a kid got suspended for holding a door open for someone they recognized with parcels in their arms. "Just buzzing in" isn't cutting it.

And the teacher who called? No communication to the front desk/administratiion?


I've only worked at the high school level, but I can assure you that I generally don't need to notify the front office ladies when a parent wants to see me.

Parent checks in, I get a phone call 'Mr. Dodger, your 10:30 appt is here. Thanks, send em my way!'
 
2014-03-23 05:01:11 PM  
Fark Magical Outrage Generator for Struggling Yellow Journos Trying to Drum Up Clicks

1. Write one sided headline on Fark
2. Link to your own one sided story
3. Dozens of Farkers fail to scratch head and say "Heeeyyy sounds like this might not be the whole story!"
4. Suck-cess.
 
2014-03-23 05:09:45 PM  

shtychkn: So they buzzed an unidentified person into the building who went straight for the children instead of identifying themselves.


Why would they buzz an unidentified person in?? At every school I've had my kids in, I've had to buzz the buzzer, wait for them to say "Can I help you?", and then Identify myself and why I'm there. Only then do they buzz me in. It's stupid to buzz everyone in- they might as well not have a locked door then.
 
2014-03-23 05:10:48 PM  
I am in Texas.

Schools labeling children on the spectrum with "Emotional Disturbance" are extremely common. This is so they can kick the kids to ED classrooms. ED - run like a prison system where you have to earn the privilege to say, go to a regular science class, or recess with your non-disabled peers; and where injuries are increasingly common from staff or other students - is much cheaper than personal aides or lower staff ratios for kids with autism.

If you want to read something really disturbing, look no further than here: http://www.help.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Seclusion%20and%20Restraints % 20Final%20Report.pdf

Yes, that's happening. It makes me physically ill.
 
2014-03-23 05:12:12 PM  

shtychkn: But they didn't know it was her.


Of course they did, or they wouldn't have buzzed her in. Or are you seriously saying they just buzz in any- and everyone who walks up to the door- in that case why have a buzzer at all??
 
2014-03-23 05:20:43 PM  

fredklein: shtychkn: But they didn't know it was her.


Why would they buzz an unidentified person in?? At every school I've had my kids in, I've had to buzz the buzzer, wait for them to say "Can I help you?", and then Identify myself and why I'm there. Only then do they buzz me in. It's stupid to buzz everyone in- they might as well not have a locked door then.

Of course they did, or they wouldn't have buzzed her in. Or are you seriously saying they just buzz in any- and everyone who walks up to the door- in that case why have a buzzer at all??


This and this. Logic isn't completely extinct after all.
 
2014-03-23 06:26:56 PM  
Good on the mother for coming to the school when the teacher called her.

75% of the parents of the special needs kids I work with act like anything that happens between 9am and 4pm ain't their farkin' problem...
 
2014-03-23 06:51:09 PM  

fredklein: shtychkn: But they didn't know it was her.

Of course they did, or they wouldn't have buzzed her in. Or are you seriously saying they just buzz in any- and everyone who walks up to the door- in that case why have a buzzer at all??


So they can control who comes into the office
 
2014-03-23 07:01:11 PM  

shtychkn: Calling the police doesn't have to result in an arrest. The police officers choose to arrest her. Why?


Anyone mad at the admin isn't addressing this question.

The police officer could have shown up and chosen to not issue any citations.

Went did the officer choose the arrest the mother?
 
2014-03-23 07:18:29 PM  

Pichu0102: JoieD'Zen: Pichu0102: So why didn't principal dipshiat call off the police if the person was known, or at least tell the police that there was a mistake?

If they called her and were expecting her to come in, and not said anything when the police arrested her, well, they're idiots.

Of course, an uncomfortable problem here is that the local area thinks that these policies are necessary to protect their children. Either the people on the board are overly paranoid, or this school has problems already. I'd say those two explanations are the most likely, and both have their own set of unfortunate implications...

It sounds like a power play by somebody in the office. The mother mentioned being in the school office prior to this; she may have pissed them off then.

That also is a possibility. Another one is someone in the office hates the kid and is trying to get them to leave by getting the parent arrested and having CPS take away the child or just force the family to move to get away from that school.


Wouldn't surprise me, I'm sure the admins at my old high school HATED my parents by the time my bullied handicapped brother and my other brother (who got into a lot of fights/barely passed) graduated.
 
2014-03-23 07:19:50 PM  

shtychkn: fredklein: shtychkn: But they didn't know it was her.

Of course they did, or they wouldn't have buzzed her in. Or are you seriously saying they just buzz in any- and everyone who walks up to the door- in that case why have a buzzer at all??

So they can control who comes into the office


So... they did identify her before letting her in? So they knew it was her.
 
2014-03-23 07:21:05 PM  

shtychkn: And that means everyone at the school knows who she is and that there is no possible way some one else could walk onto campus at the same time.

And if course, if or wad an assailant, other patents would have excused admin for not calling the police because they d understand


The odds of an armed assailant entering a school are slightly lower than you being stuck by lightning or you winning the lottery.  Just like TSA security, it's all theater.
 
2014-03-23 08:13:20 PM  

RavenOnyx: I have to agree with Pichu.

The local elementary has been basically terrorizing my youngest for six months. We had no proof. They sent her home on 2/19 with red fingermarks in her armpits, petechia, and a bruise on her back. CPS did NOTHING. The police did NOTHING. She's 8. She weighs 59lbs. Multiple issues. The worst she usually does is cry that the cafeteria ran out of pancakes, or not stop talking about MLP.

What did the school do? They called an IEP meeting to change our kid's placement and tried to blame it on her rubbing her back against a chair or some nonsense. (No, no clue how that would affect her armpits).  Their response to our kid getting hurt was to retaliate.

/we pulled her out after she came home with the injuries. Homeschooling for now, and trying to sell our house and move. There isn't another choice. An attorney for a due process case here is $$$$$$. We tried to work within the system and thought they were just clueless in the beginning. No. It's designed.
//yes, I'm very bitter right now
///not enough rum in the world
////maybe not enough slashies either


Hugs, Raven. My brother is handicapped and we where in the system for decades, hell my parents had to sue my local school district when they wanted to put him in the ESL class (they claimed it would "improve his language skills"). We had to emergency enroll him in a private special ed school about 1.5 hours away, thank god we had a stay-at-home parent.

My EIP if you want to talk, but I would suggest looking into something called "an advocate", it took some looking but my parents where able to find one who was willing to work for free until the case was won. Took my parents about 5 years I believe to win, but it was worth it even though we didn't get much money (technically we where at a loss if you calculated the amount of time and energy we put in). It let the school district know that you can't get away with farking with my brother and other handicapped kids.

I also suggest you anally record EVERYTHING: every injury, every letter/e-mail (no phone calls, get everything in writing), bring a tape recorder into meetings, etc. You will feel a little insane but you are entering a kafkaesque maze of hell and anal documentation is the only thing that will safe you.
 
2014-03-23 08:30:38 PM  

shortymac: I also suggest you anally record EVERYTHING: every injury, every letter/e-mail (no phone calls, get everything in writing), bring a tape recorder into meetings, etc. You will feel a little insane but you are entering a kafkaesque maze of hell and anal documentation is the only thing that will safe you.


So, anal then.
 
2014-03-23 08:35:26 PM  

fredklein: shtychkn: fredklein: shtychkn: But they didn't know it was her.

Of course they did, or they wouldn't have buzzed her in. Or are you seriously saying they just buzz in any- and everyone who walks up to the door- in that case why have a buzzer at all??

So they can control who comes into the office

So... they did identify her before letting her in? So they knew it was her.


The is no guarantee of that. With more info, We can't know.

What We do know is that the officer wad the one who arrested her. Why didn't he give her a warning?

Why did the police choose to arrest?
 
2014-03-23 08:36:45 PM  

BullBearMS: Are there seriously people so retarded that they think calling a parent and requesting they come to school because their special needs child is having a bit of a personal crisis and then arresting them because they come is a good idea?

School employees called her and asked her to come. School employees buzzed her into the building and recognized her when they did. The principal recognized her when she came to the classroom.

Yet they still had police arrest her? If you are that incapable of good judgement, you have no business being in charge of children.


The police arrested her, not the school admin.

Why did the police choose to arrest her instead of giving her a warning?
 
2014-03-23 08:41:47 PM  

AngryDragon: shtychkn: And that means everyone at the school knows who she is and that there is no possible way some one else could walk onto campus at the same time.

And if course, if or wad an assailant, other patents would have excused admin for not calling the police because they d understand

The odds of an armed assailant entering a school are slightly lower than you being stuck by lightning or you winning the lottery.  Just like TSA security, it's all theater.


The school admin has rules they have to follow or they can be fired or sued.

Those rules may be stupid at times, but they protect the admin and school from law suits by parents.
 
2014-03-23 09:06:14 PM  

OtherLittleGuy: Freschel: FnkyTwn: FTFAs comment section, another parent from that school posts:

"First of all that is an out right lie. This mother son is ED Emotional Disturbed and is not Autistic. The teacher did not call frantically. This mother has been an issue every since her children have attended Walnut Grove. She has threaten to stab a mother and has had conflicts with another family which led to the police and the family having a meeting Wednesday. I feel the news needs to investigate before putting anything on the air. Next time check the background of the parent before believing anything they say. She knows school and district policy. All she had to do was stop by the office and sign in. Also her son went outside and played while the police escorted her out of the building. Also the students are on special permission to attend there."

So maybe there's a bit more to the story than simply "Gestapo school agents thwart freedom by arresting fledgling eagle's patriot-hero parent. - Maybe that's why the cops took the extraordinary step of arresting her. That teacher she "met" in the hall apparently called the cops after the mother blew past her and refused to sign in.

Or that could be a fabricated lie.

Cue Giorgio with the Centauri hair...

If someone came forth and verified that she did NOT get a call from the school, and instead came in on her own, then, yeah, the lady's story falls apart and she's batshiat who broke into the school.

But they called her and buzzed her in? Especially with the history stated? Something's not adding up.

I remember a kid got suspended for holding a door open for someone they recognized with parcels in their arms. "Just buzzing in" isn't cutting it.

And the teacher who called? No communication to the front desk/administration?



Sorry, anyway what I meant to say was that woman who said that that child's mother was not speaking the truth. May have a grudge against that mother and would say anything to make her (the child's mother) to look bad. It's a possibility.
 
2014-03-23 09:47:59 PM  

shtychkn: BullBearMS: Are there seriously people so retarded that they think calling a parent and requesting they come to school because their special needs child is having a bit of a personal crisis and then arresting them because they come is a good idea?

School employees called her and asked her to come. School employees buzzed her into the building and recognized her when they did. The principal recognized her when she came to the classroom.

Yet they still had police arrest her? If you are that incapable of good judgement, you have no business being in charge of children.

The police arrested her, not the school admin.

Why did the police choose to arrest her instead of giving her a warning?


Why didn't the school admin tell the police that she was a parent who they had called and asked to come in?

She was there because they asked her to be there.
 
2014-03-23 10:00:22 PM  

BullBearMS: shtychkn: BullBearMS: Are there seriously people so retarded that they think calling a parent and requesting they come to school because their special needs child is having a bit of a personal crisis and then arresting them because they come is a good idea?

School employees called her and asked her to come. School employees buzzed her into the building and recognized her when they did. The principal recognized her when she came to the classroom.

Yet they still had police arrest her? If you are that incapable of good judgement, you have no business being in charge of children.

The police arrested her, not the school admin.

Why did the police choose to arrest her instead of giving her a warning?

Why didn't the school admin tell the police that she was a parent who they had called and asked to come in?

She was there because they asked her to be there.


We don't know what the admin told the officer. All we know is that the officer chose to arrest her when called by the admin.

The officer tales to her and then chose to arrest her.
 
2014-03-23 10:07:37 PM  
Thanks, shortymac. I might take you up on that email.

We've actually had advocates - we went through 2 on this district. They just, didn't do anything. I think we spent about $7k by the time it was all said and done (part of the reason we have no $ left for an attorney). It was just so frustrating. I do some basic advocate work to help other parents in my area and on the net (for free), but I really only know my stuff to the point that you hit mediation (hadn't been there before).

We got granted an IEE, mediation, all sorts of stuff. Till she got hurt, they took advantage of that fully to undo all we were working on. She did lash out on 2/19, screaming and kicking - because she got hurt. The school's position of course is that she did that just out of the blue, no way did anyone harm her. They ended up not even waiting for the mediator and insisting we hold the last IEP, implying if we didn't show up they'd do it without our input.

They brought in a "behavior interventionist" who did nothing but make everything worse. It's just been a nightmare. He got brought in because she needs redirected so much (her add is *severe*. not "ooh nice pretty special snowflake label", but to the point we're waiting on the ped neuro appt this summer to see if we can rule out focal seizures, which her brother has. She was 6 before she could follow a single early reading page in a book with me). They started this "hold the demand" crap with no counseling, functional behavior replacement, etc. Just "do this". "DO THIS". "She's not doing it because she's being willfully noncompliant". YANK. "Oh now she's yelling, so we have to remove her from the class." Put her in seclusion. "Oh, now she's under a table crying. Being under a table is dangerous. We have to restrain her since that's dangerous." Restraint = major escalation. Period. Hell the "interventionist" told me to my face he had never even consulted with her OT.

It's been really bad. When we got wise and told them they can't restrain her unless it meets the TEA codes.. well, NOTICES of restraint stopped coming home. At all. But dd was telling us they were still doing it. I do think they were, and I think she got hurt when she fought back.

It just.. never needed to go there. I know she's difficult in a regular classroom. She's on the spectrum, the add, Speech.. that's a lot. I really, really felt for her gen ed teacher and classmates. It was the district and administration being asshats. They said she was "too smart" to go into the expensive autism classroom for the low-verbal kids. I still think that's where she needs to be. She doesn't need to be in a room full of screaming kids and rude staff that are going to yank her around more. Gods.

There's a private school about an hour and a half away, but it's 20k+ a year. We don't have transportation back and forth for her either - I need to be in the area for my older daughter (similar disabilities) and my son (epilepsy).

Well, thanks for letting me spill about it some at least. I've met some of the special snowflake parents. They drive me nuts. I'm learning how some of them got there, though, and I understand more now. I'm sure to many of the parents at the school, and the administrator, my husband and I *are* "those parents". But there is so much that doesn't get around from our side. The school can pass rumors on so easily, while I don't have a lot of contact with the other parents.

I worry that's part of what's behind this article - especially the "emotionally disturbed" comment. Another parent wouldn't use that term (it would be psychologically specific from a private dx like odd, or really vague like "psycho" from someone who's just seen the kid melting down. "emotionally disturbed" is a specific educational dx not used outside of the districts). A teacher or administrator made that account or gave that information out to discredit the kid and the parents. There is no other reason that term would have been mentioned.
 
2014-03-23 10:17:58 PM  

RavenOnyx: Thanks, shortymac. I might take you up on that email.

We've actually had advocates - we went through 2 on this district. They just, didn't do anything. I think we spent about $7k by the time it was all said and done (part of the reason we have no $ left for an attorney). It was just so frustrating. I do some basic advocate work to help other parents in my area and on the net (for free), but I really only know my stuff to the point that you hit mediation (hadn't been there before).

We got granted an IEE, mediation, all sorts of stuff. Till she got hurt, they took advantage of that fully to undo all we were working on. She did lash out on 2/19, screaming and kicking - because she got hurt. The school's position of course is that she did that just out of the blue, no way did anyone harm her. They ended up not even waiting for the mediator and insisting we hold the last IEP, implying if we didn't show up they'd do it without our input.

They brought in a "behavior interventionist" who did nothing but make everything worse. It's just been a nightmare. He got brought in because she needs redirected so much (her add is *severe*. not "ooh nice pretty special snowflake label", but to the point we're waiting on the ped neuro appt this summer to see if we can rule out focal seizures, which her brother has. She was 6 before she could follow a single early reading page in a book with me). They started this "hold the demand" crap with no counseling, functional behavior replacement, etc. Just "do this". "DO THIS". "She's not doing it because she's being willfully noncompliant". YANK. "Oh now she's yelling, so we have to remove her from the class." Put her in seclusion. "Oh, now she's under a table crying. Being under a table is dangerous. We have to restrain her since that's dangerous." Restraint = major escalation. Period. Hell the "interventionist" told me to my face he had never even consulted with her OT.

It's been really bad. When we got wise and told them they can't restrain her unless it meets the TEA codes.. well, NOTICES of restraint stopped coming home. At all. But dd was telling us they were still doing it. I do think they were, and I think she got hurt when she fought back.

It just.. never needed to go there. I know she's difficult in a regular classroom. She's on the spectrum, the add, Speech.. that's a lot. I really, really felt for her gen ed teacher and classmates. It was the district and administration being asshats. They said she was "too smart" to go into the expensive autism classroom for the low-verbal kids. I still think that's where she needs to be. She doesn't need to be in a room full of screaming kids and rude staff that are going to yank her around more. Gods.

There's a private school about an hour and a half away, but it's 20k+ a year. We don't have transportation back and forth for her either - I need to be in the area for my older daughter (similar disabilities) and my son (epilepsy).

Well, thanks for letting me spill about it some at least. I've met some of the special snowflake parents. They drive me nuts. I'm learning how some of them got there, though, and I understand more now. I'm sure to many of the parents at the school, and the administrator, my husband and I *are* "those parents". But there is so much that doesn't get around from our side. The school can pass rumors on so easily, while I don't have a lot of contact with the other parents.

I worry that's part of what's behind this article - especially the "emotionally disturbed" comment. Another parent wouldn't use that term (it would be psychologically specific from a private dx like odd, or really vague like "psycho" from someone who's just seen the kid melting down. "emotionally disturbed" is a specific educational dx not used outside of the districts). A teacher or administrator made that account or gave that information out to discredit the kid and the parents. There is no other reason that term would have been mentioned.


Interesting read.

The school doesn't have a separate SPED clad that can she could be in?

You should really look into hiring a child advocate to attend IEP meetings with you. For most they are a waste of money. But they can help make sure the school works with you, not against you.
 
2014-03-23 10:40:15 PM  
Sorry, already stated - we worked with *two* advocates in this situation. It cost $7k (over the course of a year). I think advocates are great, but in the end, all they can advise you is to where to file complaints and how, and what your rights are. They are not attorneys. In the end, for us, they weren't even really cheaper than an attorney if we'd gone that route first.

I will grant you that parents who've never "been there" before would have gotten a lot of knowledge and such from the advocates in our situation. In our case, we already know that information. We would probably learn a lot from one taking us through due process; unfortunately, that starts at $2500. Again, not much cheaper than an attorney, and it's because it IS involved and takes a lot of time.

I know it sounds like I'm begrudging them the fee, and I don't. The only ill will I have is to the school, which dragged one IEP meeting through 4 reconventions, stringing us along to drain us financially (with an advocate) and then putting us in a position where we didn't have more money to continue paying one when we really needed it (due process).

And the rub is that I'm oh so very happy that my property taxes are paying for these same administrators and their advising lawyers to DO this to us in the first place! *headdesk*
 
2014-03-23 11:01:53 PM  

RavenOnyx: Sorry, already stated - we worked with *two* advocates in this situation. It cost $7k (over the course of a year). I think advocates are great, but in the end, all they can advise you is to where to file complaints and how, and what your rights are. They are not attorneys. In the end, for us, they weren't even really cheaper than an attorney if we'd gone that route first.

I will grant you that parents who've never "been there" before would have gotten a lot of knowledge and such from the advocates in our situation. In our case, we already know that information. We would probably learn a lot from one taking us through due process; unfortunately, that starts at $2500. Again, not much cheaper than an attorney, and it's because it IS involved and takes a lot of time.

I know it sounds like I'm begrudging them the fee, and I don't. The only ill will I have is to the school, which dragged one IEP meeting through 4 reconventions, stringing us along to drain us financially (with an advocate) and then putting us in a position where we didn't have more money to continue paying one when we really needed it (due process).

And the rub is that I'm oh so very happy that my property taxes are paying for these same administrators and their advising lawyers to DO this to us in the first place! *headdesk*


A legal remedy might be your only option. If your child can't be main steamed and they don't have the facilities to teach her in a smaller environment then the school is legally responsible to pay to send her to a school that can meet her needs.
 
2014-03-23 11:28:02 PM  

digitalrain: Though in my case it helped that the school knew who I was on sight


it seems they knew this time too
 
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