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(Salon)   The lectures that made Samuel Clemens become Mark Twain   (salon.com) divider line 27
    More: Hero, Samuel Clemens, The Sacramento Union, hair-triggers, Virginia City, pen names, speeches  
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3025 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 23 Mar 2014 at 4:36 AM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-22 11:14:50 PM
Americas first megastar stand-up.  I'm kind of ashamed that I haven't read his autobiography.  Hell he was ashamed enough to wait 100 years before allowing it to be published.  To me that was the ultimate gesture, the perfect combination of being a scathing smartass and not wanting to offend one's peers.
 
2014-03-22 11:54:29 PM

brap: I'm kind of ashamed that I haven't read his autobiography


Parts of it will make you cry.
 
2014-03-23 12:02:16 AM
I wonder if there's a transcript or something of any of his lectures.

/too lazy to look
//whisky got my brain
///3 slashies goodness
 
2014-03-23 12:12:48 AM

Marcus Aurelius: brap: I'm kind of ashamed that I haven't read his autobiography

Parts of it will make you cry.


That's not saying much.  Parts of Pamela Debarge's "I'm With The Band" made me sob like an abandoned ditch baby.
 
2014-03-23 12:18:34 AM
Not to speak flippantly of Mark Twain, but in that time it didn't take a whole lot to be profound. You could find bloggers in the hundreds that would be equally as profound now. Writing something of merit now takes a few celebrity endorsements, and a voice that can speak to the populace without coming off with a political bias. Harder than it sounds.
 
2014-03-23 01:11:37 AM
Bravo subby and admins. This was a good read and well written.

MayoSlather: You could find bloggers in the hundreds that would be equally as profound now.


You could, but I think it's fair to say he was one of the first. It may be too early to say he was a writer who truly captured his period but I think he is in the running to become a representative of his time and place, like Dickens or Shakespeare.
 
2014-03-23 04:54:14 AM
Came for TNG screencaps. Leaving disappointed to go watch the episode now.
 
2014-03-23 05:06:15 AM
Lots of Twain stuff at these sites, including audio books

Project Gutenberg

Page by Page

Librivox

Give a hoot, read a book
 
2014-03-23 06:35:05 AM

antidisestablishmentarianism: Bravo subby and admins. This was a good read and well written.


This bit jumped out at me:

He captured not only the patterns of everyday speech but their spirit: not only how Americans talked but how they thought. That night at the Academy of Music, he premiered a personality that, by the end of the century, would be enshrined in the national psyche. It was especially well suited for the modernizing nation that emerged after the Civil War: quotable, photogenic, endlessly self-aggrandizing.
 
2014-03-23 07:13:53 AM

neongoats: Came for TNG screencaps. Leaving disappointed to go watch the episode now.


Accept these images of Mark Twain meeting Satan as a consolation prize.

ledfloyd18.files.wordpress.comi1.kym-cdn.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak3z2Pm7Iwg
 
2014-03-23 08:05:09 AM

TomD9938: antidisestablishmentarianism: Bravo subby and admins. This was a good read and well written.

This bit jumped out at me:

He captured not only the patterns of everyday speech but their spirit: not only how Americans talked but how they thought. That night at the Academy of Music, he premiered a personality that, by the end of the century, would be enshrined in the national psyche. It was especially well suited for the modernizing nation that emerged after the Civil War: quotable, photogenic, endlessly self-aggrandizing.


He had a stage character that he played to the point of irony.
Most of his life, Clemens mock his country in the guise of Mark Twain. He took on and took down the hypocrisies that infect the American experience then and even do to this day. Most of the time, when people laughed at Twain, they were laughing at themselves. He rode the zeitgeist.
 
2014-03-23 09:17:33 AM

antidisestablishmentarianism: Bravo subby and admins. This was a good read and well written.

MayoSlather: You could find bloggers in the hundreds that would be equally as profound now.

You could, but I think it's fair to say he was one of the first. It may be too early to say he was a writer who truly captured his period but I think he is in the running to become a representative of his time and place, like Dickens or Shakespeare.


All of that.
 
2014-03-23 09:25:12 AM
There's a part of the Autobiography that's like a scene from Twin Peaks.

A local man's daughter died, and rather than bury her he had her body placed in a large container of formaldehyde. Then, he put that into one of the caves around town. It became a local dare for the town's boys to creep up and touch it.

(The closest thing in our neighborhood was to walk all the way through the storm drain and burn a daddy long-legs with the candle you needed.)
 
2014-03-23 09:40:10 AM
Clemens did want to be pals with the tycoons he mocked. (see Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain by Justin Kaplan. I think it's still in print. Published around 40 years ago.)
 
2014-03-23 09:40:39 AM
If you like Twain, but you're not a hardcore fan, you probably haven't ready American Claimant.  Its available as a free book via Gutenburg or Amazon.


"Unquestionably your confederate-I mean your-your fellow-craftsman-is a great colorist-"
"Oh, danke schon!-"
-"in fact a quite extraordinary colorist; a colorist, I make bold to say, without imitator here or abroad-and with a most bold and effective touch, a touch like a battering ram; and a manner so peculiar and romantic, and extraneous, and ad libitum, and heart-searching, that-that-he-he is an impressionist, I presume?"
"No," said the captain simply, "he is a Presbyterian."
"It accounts for it all [...]"
 
2014-03-23 09:41:17 AM
"Read", not "ready", of course.
 
2014-03-23 10:14:57 AM
Inherited a complete set of his works:

'Arthur National Edition' - 25 volumes copyright 1913, Harper and Brothers, New York and London.

Has a flyleaf with this inscribed: 'The is the Authorized Uniform Edition of My Books - Mark Twain'

It's printed in each book.

Plus on one page 6 Japanese or Chinese symbols.

I think they mean 'Strong Warrior'...
 
2014-03-23 11:04:27 AM

antidisestablishmentarianism: It may be too early to say he was a writer who truly captured his period but I think he is in the running to become a representative of his time and place, like Dickens or Shakespeare.


You really think Shakespeare represented his time?
More like was a dramatic escape from his times.

Twain captured the complexities and conflicts of common American culture, from slavery to and entire tableau of poseurs and scam artists, and made open fun of it. His cynicism and social criticism was only thinly veiled by humor, which pretty much dropped away later in his life as his entire family predeceased him.
 
2014-03-23 11:24:15 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: You really think Shakespeare represented his time?


What a weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable meme that is.
 
2014-03-23 11:48:58 AM
His autobiography gave me an entirely different opinion of uslyes grant.


Great book
 
2014-03-23 12:00:18 PM

yakmans_dad: Clemens did want to be pals with the tycoons he mocked. (see Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain by Justin Kaplan. I think it's still in print. Published around 40 years ago.)


He did want to be pals, but he mostly couldn't. Mostly because ... he mocked them.
He always wanted to be in the elite clubs, but couldn't charm or buy his way into them.
He was not of their class and this rankled him all of his life, as he struggled all his life with money and losing  money. He was the boy from Hannibal, even as a grown man. This class consciousness imbues most of his writing.

It's interesting how Clemens' most successful literary project was altruistic -- he published Ulysses Grant's memoirs. Grant was broke and dying of cancer at the end of his life and Clemens enabled him to write his memoir so he could provide for his family. Grant died just a few days after penning the last lines of the two-volume set, which was hugely successful and profitable.
 
2014-03-23 02:08:00 PM
Who wrote Grant's autobiography?
 
2014-03-23 02:46:42 PM

TV's Vinnie: neongoats: Came for TNG screencaps. Leaving disappointed to go watch the episode now.

Accept these images of Mark Twain meeting Satan as a consolation prize.

[ledfloyd18.files.wordpress.com image 420x228][i1.kym-cdn.com image 425x259]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak3z2Pm7Iwg


I just bought "The Adventures of Mark Twain" on Blu-Ray yesterday. I'm looking forward to watching it this afternoon while eating corned beef leftover from St. Patrick's Day on Russian rye and washing it down with some Belgian ale.

I'll never understand why so many people still chafe at the ongoing, evolving diversity of the United States. Because arguably above anything else that's what continues to make this county so vital and resilient.

"In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot."
 
2014-03-23 04:49:59 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: yakmans_dad: Clemens did want to be pals with the tycoons he mocked. (see Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain by Justin Kaplan. I think it's still in print. Published around 40 years ago.)

He did want to be pals, but he mostly couldn't. Mostly because ... he mocked them.
He always wanted to be in the elite clubs, but couldn't charm or buy his way into them.
He was not of their class and this rankled him all of his life, as he struggled all his life with money and losing  money. He was the boy from Hannibal, even as a grown man. This class consciousness imbues most of his writing.

It's interesting how Clemens' most successful literary project was altruistic -- he published Ulysses Grant's memoirs. Grant was broke and dying of cancer at the end of his life and Clemens enabled him to write his memoir so he could provide for his family. Grant died just a few days after penning the last lines of the two-volume set, which was hugely successful and profitable.


My mother has (still, I hope) an original printing of Grant's memoirs. I only looked at them briefly a couple times because the books were in fairly rough shape and I didn't want to fark them up. The story when I was a kid was that we were related to Grant, but my genealogical research hasn't yielded any confirmation. I see the paperback is only about $10 on Amazon and just added it to my "buy" list.
 
2014-03-23 04:53:46 PM

TV's Vinnie: neongoats: Came for TNG screencaps. Leaving disappointed to go watch the episode now.

Accept these images of Mark Twain meeting Satan as a consolation prize.

[ledfloyd18.files.wordpress.com image 420x228][i1.kym-cdn.com image 425x259]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak3z2Pm7Iwg


Ah. The Mysterious Stranger. Great story. I have this in my Netflix queue. Looks like something to watch after Cosmos tonight.
 
2014-03-23 08:54:47 PM

yakmans_dad: HotIgneous Intruder: You really think Shakespeare represented his time?

What a weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable meme that is.


Get thee to a nunnary!
 
2014-03-23 08:56:16 PM
Protip: Twain's autobiography is well suited to audio book. Borrow it from your library.
 
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