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(Google)   59 out of 80 dead as Ebola makes another run at the gates. Sleep tight   (google.com) divider line 31
    More: Scary, ebola, protective equipment, Guinean, Doctors Without Borders, World Health Organisation  
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13247 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Mar 2014 at 7:00 PM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-03-22 07:03:35 PM  
4 votes:
"The Hot Zone" is a very good book worth reading on this subject, even if sometimes the author tries to guess/write fiction at what a person was thinking and what his motivations were even though the book is supposed to be non-fiction.
2014-03-22 07:16:39 PM  
3 votes:

wildcardjack: Always gets me that the numbers are so low. It must present symptoms at almost the same time as it becomes contagious.


From what I remember reading, the disease is fatal but the drawbacks it has is that it kills really really fast compared to other diseases and that it is lethal most of the time. Means there are less carriers walking around letting the disease incubate and spread because the people are just dying.
2014-03-22 09:12:08 PM  
2 votes:

skinink: "The Hot Zone" is a very good book worth reading on this subject, even if sometimes the author tries to guess/write fiction at what a person was thinking and what his motivations were even though the book is supposed to be non-fiction.


I enjoyed Richard Preston's novel, "The Cobra Event," as well.  His fictional virus causes victims to um, injure themselves.
2014-03-22 08:17:37 PM  
2 votes:
BTW the worrisome thing with this outbreak, Guinea is nowhere near what was Zaire, now Democratic Republic of the Congo, where ebola is normally found.
2014-03-23 06:45:06 AM  
1 votes:
Great Justice:

Even so, I'll admit my post is quite alarmist, and the chances of dying in a terrorist attack are extremely less likely than death by heart disease or cancer for most westerners.  The terrorists could probably kill far more of us if they put their efforts into developing some sort of salty chocolate deep fried sugar cubes on a stick to mass market instead.

It sounds like you're talking about weaponized food. Unfortunately, there are temporary labs all over the US regularly working on such WMDs. They're called "State Fairs"
2014-03-22 09:48:03 PM  
1 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: Do not expose yourself to the bodily fluids of an Ebola victim.

You probably shouldn't drink out of the same glass either.

And double dipping is out of the question.


It's shunning like this that prevents the Ebola positive from leading a normal, healthy lifestyle.

That, and the 80% mortality rate in a week thing
2014-03-22 09:46:33 PM  
1 votes:

skinink: wildcardjack: Always gets me that the numbers are so low. It must present symptoms at almost the same time as it becomes contagious.

From what I remember reading, the disease is fatal but the drawbacks it has is that it kills really really fast compared to other diseases and that it is lethal most of the time. Means there are less carriers walking around letting the disease incubate and spread because the people are just dying.


My rule when playing pandemic, you want as few symptoms as possible, to the point of "un-evolving" symptoms just to stay on the down-low while building up infection vectors.

I should crack into plague inc. sometime.
2014-03-22 09:40:02 PM  
1 votes:

Wicked Chinchilla: Somaticasual: skinink: From what I remember reading, the disease is fatal but the drawbacks it has is that it kills really really fast compared to other diseases and that it is lethal most of the time. Means there are less carriers walking around letting the disease incubate and spread because the people are just dying.

Plus, pretty easy to spot the guy bleeding from his skin pores..

//literally, god help anyone with ebola. That is a genuinely terrifying pathogen..

Rabies.  Farking Rabies man.

If you show symptoms...its already too late.  99% fatality rate.  The one, singular exception in the history of the world where someone survived after showing symptoms is when they dropped the chick into a coma to shut down her CNS and give the body a chance to clear it.  Having to do a force reboot on a human to kill a disease is horrifying.


Your info is a little old. They had over a half-dozen survivors with that treatment and its success rate is rising.
Still a sucky disease.
2014-03-22 09:28:32 PM  
1 votes:
Don't act like a savage and dance around in your dead relative's blood and bodily fluids like savages and you'll be fine.
2014-03-22 09:24:12 PM  
1 votes:

Somaticasual: skinink: From what I remember reading, the disease is fatal but the drawbacks it has is that it kills really really fast compared to other diseases and that it is lethal most of the time. Means there are less carriers walking around letting the disease incubate and spread because the people are just dying.

Plus, pretty easy to spot the guy bleeding from his skin pores..

//literally, god help anyone with ebola. That is a genuinely terrifying pathogen..


Rabies.  Farking Rabies man.

If you show symptoms...its already too late.  99% fatality rate.  The one, singular exception in the history of the world where someone survived after showing symptoms is when they dropped the chick into a coma to shut down her CNS and give the body a chance to clear it.  Having to do a force reboot on a human to kill a disease is horrifying.
2014-03-22 09:15:44 PM  
1 votes:

Ex-Texan: What was tthat movie that addressed an epidemic?  not based in Africa, but the result of a chimese pig farming operation. Not "12Monkeys", but close to it.


Contagion

pig/bat virus cocktail
2014-03-22 09:02:17 PM  
1 votes:

skinink: From what I remember reading, the disease is fatal but the drawbacks it has is that it kills really really fast compared to other diseases and that it is lethal most of the time. Means there are less carriers walking around letting the disease incubate and spread because the people are just dying.


Plus, pretty easy to spot the guy bleeding from his skin pores..

//literally, god help anyone with ebola. That is a genuinely terrifying pathogen..
2014-03-22 08:56:51 PM  
1 votes:

skinink: "The Hot Zone" is a very good book worth reading on this subject, even if sometimes the author tries to guess/write fiction at what a person was thinking and what his motivations were even though the book is supposed to be non-fiction.


The lab in Reston is a daycare now. The Ebola is better than what you'd get there now.
2014-03-22 08:52:50 PM  
1 votes:

wildcardjack: Always gets me that the numbers are so low. It must present symptoms at almost the same time as it becomes contagious.


[shrug]

It's self limiting. Any virus that kills so fast with that kind of death rate simply can't sustain itself long enough to rack up impressive numbers.

Either a virus has to be airborne like flu, or kill slower with fewer deaths, like smallpox, to get your global pandemic totals.
2014-03-22 08:01:56 PM  
1 votes:

Wicked Chinchilla: Ginnungagap42: skinink: "The Hot Zone" is a very good book worth reading on this subject, even if sometimes the author tries to guess/write fiction at what a person was thinking and what his motivations were even though the book is supposed to be non-fiction.

CSB

At the time of the Ebola Reston incident, I was a budding young chemist at Hazleton Laboratories in Vienna, VA. Before they got the CDC and eventually USAMRIID involved, they performed the necropsies on the dead monkeys down the hall from my lab (the monkeys were transported from the Reston primate facility to the necropsy lab in Vienna). You could have told us that the monkeys had ebola and none of us would have know what you were talking about. We were told to report any "flu-like" symptoms to the mammalian toxicology folks. If memory serves, I think we had two people get sick, but no one died. It was 100% lethal to the monkeys though.

We all freaked out when "The Hot Zone" came out. Since then, I've gone into computers - much less crazy biohazard exposure.

/CSB

Would be interesting to see how many of you have antibodies against it. As far as ebola reston is concerned I'm not aware of it ever causing known human illness (for sure no fatalities). Of course the rule of thumb for that bug is "yeah, it hasn't done anything yet, but its fraternal twins are bastards and no one wants to be patient zero." Its treated with the same precautions as the other strains



Two of the mammalian tox techs got sick with very bad flu-like symptoms. Of course, it could have been two very bad cases of flu for all I know. And yeah, zero human fatalities.

I worked in a radiolabeling lab. We always joked that the higher than normal background radiation killed all the bugs in our lab.
2014-03-22 07:56:57 PM  
1 votes:

LesserEvil: Canton: [img.fark.net image 616x662]

For real this time.

/Damn

Shakes tiny fist....


One.  Farking.  Second.
2014-03-22 07:56:04 PM  
1 votes:

PathologyFreak: Boojum2k: Reverend J: skinink: wildcardjack: Always gets me that the numbers are so low. It must present symptoms at almost the same time as it becomes contagious.

From what I remember reading, the disease is fatal but the drawbacks it has is that it kills really really fast compared to other diseases and that it is lethal most of the time. Means there are less carriers walking around letting the disease incubate and spread because the people are just dying.

Hopefully that continues to remain true, if there's ever a mutation that increases the length of time before symptoms appear, we're in real trouble.

Doesn't have to be a mutation. A microbiology student could just about make a version with a long latency period and airborne spread in a home lab, and we're just getting closer to that capability daily. Of course, they'd probably be the first person to melt.

As someone who just finished my dissertation working with hemorrhagic diseases, specifically looking at attenuating one of them, I can assure you this still isn't anywhere near easy. While the DIY movement is really cool I doubt many would be anywhere near the skill level to even look at modification and characterization of a pathogen, let alone a BSL4 pathogen.

On the other note, yes Ebola virus is very quick and actually fairly difficult to spread, at least the strains which are pathogenic to humans. Reston had evidence of airborne spread in NHPs but no clinical disease in exposed humans. The biggest factors are believed to be exposure to infected vector, shared needles (hospitals recycle them), and direct contact with fluids of near-deceased or deceased. They normally have very close family care in the clinics (aka families feed/bath/clothe) and very direct contact during some funeral rights.

This is the type of outbreak I would love to be involved with, if only EIS took more field based PhDs. Dang MDs and their lack of laboratory training.

Hope they get it under control soon.


Its the funeral rights that tend to be particularly devastating. Its really depressing actually because these people have to say goodbye totheir loved ones and the EIS officers have to tell them they have to discard all their cultural norms or risk high chance of death. Once the outbreak is recognized the healthcare related transmissions can be clamped down but people tend to hold on to religious belief more tightly than money...
2014-03-22 07:45:20 PM  
1 votes:

Ginnungagap42: skinink: "The Hot Zone" is a very good book worth reading on this subject, even if sometimes the author tries to guess/write fiction at what a person was thinking and what his motivations were even though the book is supposed to be non-fiction.

CSB

At the time of the Ebola Reston incident, I was a budding young chemist at Hazleton Laboratories in Vienna, VA. Before they got the CDC and eventually USAMRIID involved, they performed the necropsies on the dead monkeys down the hall from my lab (the monkeys were transported from the Reston primate facility to the necropsy lab in Vienna). You could have told us that the monkeys had ebola and none of us would have know what you were talking about. We were told to report any "flu-like" symptoms to the mammalian toxicology folks. If memory serves, I think we had two people get sick, but no one died. It was 100% lethal to the monkeys though.

We all freaked out when "The Hot Zone" came out. Since then, I've gone into computers - much less crazy biohazard exposure.

/CSB


Would be interesting to see how many of you have antibodies against it. As far as ebola reston is concerned I'm not aware of it ever causing known human illness (for sure no fatalities). Of course the rule of thumb for that bug is "yeah, it hasn't done anything yet, but its fraternal twins are bastards and no one wants to be patient zero." Its treated with the same precautions as the other strains
2014-03-22 07:32:18 PM  
1 votes:

Bit'O'Gristle: Oh yes, you could be married to my ex wife. I wouldnt wish that on anyone. You're better off with the ebola lip lock.


One's a disease that utterly destroys you from the inside out until you wish for death, and the other is an African virus?
2014-03-22 07:28:17 PM  
1 votes:

skinink: "The Hot Zone" is a very good book worth reading on this subject, even if sometimes the author tries to guess/write fiction at what a person was thinking and what his motivations were even though the book is supposed to be non-fiction.


CSB

At the time of the Ebola Reston incident, I was a budding young chemist at Hazleton Laboratories in Vienna, VA. Before they got the CDC and eventually USAMRIID involved, they performed the necropsies on the dead monkeys down the hall from my lab (the monkeys were transported from the Reston primate facility to the necropsy lab in Vienna). You could have told us that the monkeys had ebola and none of us would have know what you were talking about. We were told to report any "flu-like" symptoms to the mammalian toxicology folks. If memory serves, I think we had two people get sick, but no one died. It was 100% lethal to the monkeys though.

We all freaked out when "The Hot Zone" came out. Since then, I've gone into computers - much less crazy biohazard exposure.

/CSB
2014-03-22 07:26:29 PM  
1 votes:
Limited to small outbreaks until a strain develops that can spread by aerosol.
2014-03-22 07:23:26 PM  
1 votes:

skinink: wildcardjack: Always gets me that the numbers are so low. It must present symptoms at almost the same time as it becomes contagious.

From what I remember reading, the disease is fatal but the drawbacks it has is that it kills really really fast compared to other diseases and that it is lethal most of the time. Means there are less carriers walking around letting the disease incubate and spread because the people are just dying.


Hopefully that continues to remain true, if there's ever a mutation that increases the length of time before symptoms appear, we're in real trouble.
2014-03-22 07:16:44 PM  
1 votes:
Do not expose yourself to the bodily fluids of an Ebola victim.

You probably shouldn't drink out of the same glass either.

And double dipping is out of the question.
2014-03-22 07:16:20 PM  
1 votes:

Bit'O'Gristle: Nothing like a nice visit from your friendly hemorrhagic fever that turns your organs to soup and then jumps to the next host. Odd...if you think about it. A virus, that by it's nature, destroys the host that allows it to reproduce and live. Not too smart, but definitely deadly.


Pretty much. It's not the most successful virus in terms of spread. (I'd actually give that to any cold virus floating around out there. Sure, the host's immune system typically kills it, but not before the thing has spread just everywhere the host has been.)

Um, it's possible I've read The Andromeda Strain a few too many times.

/One of Crichton's better works.
2014-03-22 07:14:47 PM  
1 votes:

Bit'O'Gristle: Nothing like a nice visit from your friendly hemorrhagic fever that turns your organs to soup and then jumps to the next host. Odd...if you think about it. A virus, that by it's nature, destroys the host that allows it to reproduce and live. Not too smart, but definitely deadly.


You have summarized my dating life.
2014-03-22 07:12:51 PM  
1 votes:
Is happy with this development, pleased to meet you, and hopes you guessed his name.

upload.wikimedia.org
2014-03-22 07:10:14 PM  
1 votes:
Nothing like a nice visit from your friendly hemorrhagic fever that turns your organs to soup and then jumps to the next host. Odd...if you think about it. A virus, that by it's nature, destroys the host that allows it to reproduce and live. Not too smart, but definitely deadly.
2014-03-22 07:06:36 PM  
1 votes:
Always gets me that the numbers are so low. It must present symptoms at almost the same time as it becomes contagious.
2014-03-22 07:05:33 PM  
1 votes:

skinink: "The Hot Zone" is a very good book worth reading on this subject, even if sometimes the author tries to guess/write fiction at what a person was thinking and what his motivations were even though the book is supposed to be non-fiction.


Terrifying book.
2014-03-22 07:04:31 PM  
1 votes:
Newsflash from Madagascar:

img2u.info
2014-03-22 07:04:30 PM  
1 votes:
img.fark.net

For real this time.

/Damn
 
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