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(Christian Science Monitor)   Fossil chromosomes show ferns basically stopped evolving and have just been lazily curling and uncurling for the past 180 million years   (csmonitor.com ) divider line
    More: Sad, chromosomes, ferns, fossils, Paleobotany, evolution, living fossils, Lund University, hiking trails  
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1354 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Mar 2014 at 12:19 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-22 11:18:13 AM  
Why the sad tag? It's kind of cool that they found a successful niche millions of years ago and they are really pretty just the way they are.
 
2014-03-22 12:03:43 PM  
pffft...

/Humans did it in half the time
 
2014-03-22 12:15:31 PM  
No GOP party in the Fern World.
 
2014-03-22 12:22:36 PM  
"stopped evolving" subby?

What about Ferns are God's Perfect Creation??

/clearly they were made in His image
 
2014-03-22 12:26:21 PM  
Guess they just have not felt the pressure.
 
2014-03-22 12:38:58 PM  
Don't got a problem? Don't 'fix' it.
 
2014-03-22 12:41:49 PM  
Ever go into a store like Fry's or Guitar Center and see the interface is still ye olde terminal? Somewhere in the past they got locked in a no-upgrade path.
 
2014-03-22 12:45:40 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-22 12:51:15 PM  
img.fark.net
 
F42
2014-03-22 12:53:04 PM  
Dr. McLoughlin and colleagues Benjamin Bomfluer and Vivi Vajda were able to image cells in a variety of developmental stages, as well as the fossil remains of the gel-like cytoplasm that filled the cells and the chromosomes that emerged in them. Features in the cells are virtually identical to those in living royal ferns

To be clear, the microscopic structure is as similar as the outwards appearance.

They did not sequence any DNA, they just looked at it all bunched in in chromosomes.
 
2014-03-22 01:09:23 PM  
Just proves ferns are really only 6000 yrs old. Duh.
 
2014-03-22 01:15:47 PM  

F42: Dr. McLoughlin and colleagues Benjamin Bomfluer and Vivi Vajda were able to image cells in a variety of developmental stages, as well as the fossil remains of the gel-like cytoplasm that filled the cells and the chromosomes that emerged in them. Features in the cells are virtually identical to those in living royal ferns

To be clear, the microscopic structure is as similar as the outwards appearance.

They did not sequence any DNA, they just looked at it all bunched in in chromosomes.




True, though think about the difference, for example, between human and chimp chromosomes--they have two more than we do, and that's just 2-ish million years of separation. It's quite astounding that the karyotype is still the same. And they look the same, which suggests little to no functional changes in the genome. Examining divergence of genomes among living fern species would be a phenomenal way to understand which parts of the genome (non-coding) are subject to natural selection

/basic science ftw!
 
2014-03-22 01:48:48 PM  
The fern has reached the end road of improvement. What more does it need to succeed as a plant?

It sporulates from underneath its leaves assuring cornucopias reproduction and is ubiquitous world wide (minus the colder climates).

/Ostrich fern shoots can be picked before they unravel in the spring and used as a green in stir-frys.
 
2014-03-22 01:53:26 PM  
If it works....  I was under the impression that the local ferns were closer to 500 million years.

The local government groups love to call plants "natives" when the only native plants that still exist are ferns.  Everything else is either "post Aboriginal" or "post European"
 
2014-03-22 01:54:43 PM  

NBAH: The fern has reached the end road of improvement. What more does it need to succeed as a plant?

It sporulates from underneath its leaves assuring cornucopias reproduction and is ubiquitous world wide (minus the colder climates).

/Ostrich fern shoots can be picked before they unravel in the spring and used as a green in stir-frys.


Actually they're even in colder climates.  They're extremely hardy.
 
2014-03-22 01:57:29 PM  

pivazena: for example, between human and chimp chromosomes--they have two more than we do, and that's just 2-ish million years of separation.


A change in number of chromosomes is not uncommon.  The problem is your an animal with X chromosomes normally but you happen to have X-1 or X+1, you need to find a mate that matches.  For some odd reason, the X+2 or X-2 are far more stable than the +/- 1.
 
2014-03-22 02:01:22 PM  
It's the same thing with sharks really. Until we showed up, they've had zero reason to change at all and aren't that much different than what they were like when the dinosaurs were still chomping on eachother.
 
2014-03-22 02:07:42 PM  

DON.MAC: If it works....  I was under the impression that the local ferns were closer to 500 million years.

The local government groups love to call plants "natives" when the only native plants that still exist are ferns.  Everything else is either "post Aboriginal" or "post European"


And marijuana. Did you forget that one?
 
2014-03-22 02:08:50 PM  

lousyskater: It's the same thing with sharks really. Until we showed up, they've had zero reason to change at all and aren't that much different than what they were like when the dinosaurs were still chomping on eachother.


Crocodiles and cockroaches, too (and those waterbear thngs that Cosmos is making famous). They've maintaine constant positions in an ever-changing ecosystem. They are great examples of natural selection succeeding, and great control specimens in the study of why organisms evolve.
 
2014-03-22 02:14:32 PM  

DON.MAC: pivazena: for example, between human and chimp chromosomes--they have two more than we do, and that's just 2-ish million years of separation.

A change in number of chromosomes is not uncommon.  The problem is your an animal with X chromosomes normally but you happen to have X-1 or X+1, you need to find a mate that matches.  For some odd reason, the X+2 or X-2 are far more stable than the +/- 1.




Well the chimp example is admittedly misleading as it appears we combined two chromosomes into one, so in theory their two would align with our one during metaphase. Sounds like you're referring to genome duplications though?
 
2014-03-22 03:06:10 PM  

ginandbacon: Why the sad tag? It's kind of cool that they found a successful niche millions of years ago and they are really pretty just the way they are.


What's cool is realizing that implies a resistance to drift & mutation, too. Stable (and edible) life forms are your friends!
 
2014-03-22 03:09:54 PM  
Sad? They're perfect. Let's see you stop evolving.
 
2014-03-22 03:16:44 PM  

pivazena: F42: Dr. McLoughlin and colleagues Benjamin Bomfluer and Vivi Vajda were able to image cells in a variety of developmental stages, as well as the fossil remains of the gel-like cytoplasm that filled the cells and the chromosomes that emerged in them. Features in the cells are virtually identical to those in living royal ferns

To be clear, the microscopic structure is as similar as the outwards appearance.

They did not sequence any DNA, they just looked at it all bunched in in chromosomes.

True, though think about the difference, for example, between human and chimp chromosomes--they have two more than we do, and that's just 2-ish million years of separation. It's quite astounding that the karyotype is still the same. And they look the same, which suggests little to no functional changes in the genome. Examining divergence of genomes among living fern species would be a phenomenal way to understand which parts of the genome (non-coding) are subject to natural selection

/basic science ftw!


It's even more surprising given that plants are generally more plastic when it comes to chromosomal variation due to the reproductive nature (High numbers of eggs and sperm). Whole genome duplication is not uncommon.
 
2014-03-22 04:22:56 PM  
And taste delicious with a little butter and shallot after being sauteed...
 
2014-03-22 05:48:50 PM  

FormlessOne: ginandbacon: Why the sad tag? It's kind of cool that they found a successful niche millions of years ago and they are really pretty just the way they are.

What's cool is realizing that implies a resistance to drift & mutation, too. Stable (and edible) life forms are your friends!


Don't get me started on fiddleheads.
 
2014-03-22 06:15:28 PM  
It makes me wonder how an organism that requires such a specific environment to reproduce could survive all the climate changes and mass extinctions over the last half billion years.
 
2014-03-22 09:07:04 PM  

clkeagle: lousyskater: It's the same thing with sharks really. Until we showed up, they've had zero reason to change at all and aren't that much different than what they were like when the dinosaurs were still chomping on eachother.

Crocodiles and cockroaches, too (and those waterbear thngs that Cosmos is making famous). They've maintaine constant positions in an ever-changing ecosystem. They are great examples of natural selection succeeding, and great control specimens in the study of why organisms evolve.


So crocodiles, cockroaches, Keith Richards, and now ferns can be added to the list of things that will likely survive a nuclear holocaust. :)
 
2014-03-23 03:33:52 AM  
i3.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-23 08:16:30 AM  
Sad?
 
2014-03-23 10:11:25 AM  
So, this is the Fern Planet and it all belongs to them.
 
2014-03-23 11:17:46 AM  
This don't surprise me one bit.  No, sir.  Ever' time ol' Vern comes over he just lies there on the couch drinkin' my beer and scratchin' hisself...What?  This ain't about...Oh.  Nevermind.
 
2014-03-23 01:11:41 PM  

NBAH: The fern has reached the end road of improvement. What more does it need to succeed as a plant?

It sporulates from underneath its leaves assuring cornucopias reproduction and is ubiquitous world wide (minus the colder climates).

/Ostrich fern shoots can be picked before they unravel in the spring and used as a green in stir-frys.


Oh, fiddleheads!
 
2014-03-23 08:58:12 PM  

ReverendJynxed: Sad? They're perfect. Let's see you stop evolving.


We already have. We traded off any chance of evolving further a long time ago. As a result, even the weakest of our species have a chance to live a long and reproductive life. Any improvements made to homo sapeins will need to be man-made. Although I'm still holding out hope I develop mutant powers.

/off to go "accidentally" get exposed to radiation
 
2014-03-24 12:53:26 AM  
In before liberals start calling ferns bigots and racists for refusing to evolve.


Stories like this are why evolution is still sa theory. No good reason why they shouldn't have evolved in that time.

/maybe they have
//mmaybe they only move when we aren't looking
 
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