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(The Atlantic)   Hey, parents, leave them kids alone   (theatlantic.com) divider line 11
    More: Obvious  
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6174 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Mar 2014 at 8:54 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-21 09:07:50 AM  
3 votes:
Once our culture decided children were the ultimate status symbol, decided babies were another type of hood ornament, well, then they became things, expensive things that need to be protected. You don't let your prized possession tromp over rough terrain.
2014-03-21 10:16:06 AM  
2 votes:
Let's see, I am 49, what did I do as a kid (say 6-13 years old)?

1) Made bombs (black powder and potassium chlorate/sulfur).
2) Made incendiary devices from powdered aluminum.
3) Went rat hunting unsupervised with a .22 caliber rifle.
4) Was left at home along while my parents went out for the evening.
5) Rode around the neighborhood on my bike for hours. I would range about 2-3 miles.
6) Played in the wood unsupervised where we built forts out parents never saw.
7) Went everywhere with my BB gun and shot anything I could that would not get me in trouble.
8) Went exploring in the storm sewers (have to admit that the parents had a cow about this, we kept doing it anyway)

I think modern parents are crazy. I raised my son like I was; l I even let him get his motorcycle license when he was 15. Everyone tells me how mature he is, and how far he is ahead of his peers. He is 20, working full time as a firefighter and going to school full time at a top 20 state university. I feel sorry for most kids today, they are generally helpless.

CSB?
2014-03-21 09:32:42 AM  
2 votes:
My concern with letting my kid roam free once he's no longer a toddler isn't concern for evil people or that my kid might do something too stupid, it's that you could replace the drivers in my neighborhood with moderately trained chimps and nobody would know the difference.
2014-03-21 09:07:51 AM  
2 votes:
I grew up in a neighborhood of 20 boys my own age, with 20 stay at home moms who "seemed" to ignore us, but always managed to catch us when we did anything too stupid.


I felt horribly guilty raising my kids in an apartment complex where I was the only parent that seemed to give a crap if my kid screamed under someone's window.  It wasn't the kind of environment where kids could run free.  On the rare occasions I informed parents that their kids were acting dangerously (ie. playing chicken with oncoming cars,) I felt like those parents were pissed off at being interrupted from a world of warcraft session.

There's a thin line between letting your kids explore the world and letting them terrorize the neighbors.
2014-03-21 09:04:20 AM  
2 votes:
This Land is a good land and we shall call it... This Land.
2014-03-21 11:38:12 AM  
1 votes:

Miss Alexandra: I do have to keep a closer watch on my 12-year-old son due to his developmental delay/mild autism.  He's extremely outgoing and friendly.  That's good...but not if he winds up saying "hi" to some pervert.  He's smart, but social situations, that's another story.

He loves working with tools.  I get him old toys at Goodwill that he can take apart.  If I'm missing a screwdriver chances are it's in his room.  He knows what he can or can't take apart, so his TV is safe.  I can ask him to get me a Philips or flathead screwdriver and he knows what I'm talking about.


Is this something that some adults don't think a 12 year old boy would know? That would be sad and surprising for me.
2014-03-21 11:04:57 AM  
1 votes:
Eh, after reading "STFU Parents" (http://www.stfuparentsblog.com/ ) for awhile, I believe this shiat isn't about the kids, really. Like everything else, it's about the gigantic attention whores who think that literally everything about them, everything that concerns them, everything that comes out of them is the most important thing in the world and the rest of us just don't understand that.

It's not about love for a child and wanting nothing bad to happen to him/her. It's about everyone knowing that that parent (usually, but not always, the mother) is the bestest mom in the whole world. The mother against whom all other mothers throughout history are judged - and found wanting. The mother who has redefined, for all time, the word "mother." The mother who cares more about her offspring than anyone ever will. Ever. Including the kid's future spouse.

So in that sense, it's helpful that these people out themselves early on, so that future partners of their unfortunate children will have ample warning and don't do anything stupid, like marry them.
2014-03-21 09:44:31 AM  
1 votes:
That's a post-apocalyptic playground. It's actually... sort of cool. Just let me re-up my tetanus shot.
2014-03-21 09:15:48 AM  
1 votes:

InterruptingQuirk: FTA "I have memories of childhood so different from the way my children are growing up that sometimes I think I might be making them up, or at least exaggerating them."

True that.

I suppose one option would be to just let my kids out into the neighborhood willy-nilly and let them be. But if other parents don't follow suit, they would effectively be out there alone. I suppose having the world to explore alone with no one to get in the way of the resources kids are interested in exploiting for fun would be great from a ease of enjoyment standpoint, but then they don't learn to interact with their peers in striving after what others also want. Then there is the village awareness that isn't there in case something does go wrong. Used to be that if Billy or Sally did do something stupid, even if they didn't play with Joey or Susie, the neighborhood whisper chain would provide that Joey and Susie knew about it anyways, and therefore even if parents didn't know the information they needed to know in the event of a problem, it still existed within the neighborhood collective awareness and only had to be retrieved through some inquiry.


Dont forget that with the neighborhood awareness if a parent that was not yours caught you doing something you shouldn't be doing, they would punish you then tell your parents and then you'd get punished again.

As Christopher Titus once said "it takes a village to raise a kid and my dad was the rogue sherriff" (paraphrasing)
2014-03-21 09:12:26 AM  
1 votes:
My brothers and I grew up in a great neighborhood on the edge of town. We had miles of nothing behind us, with a huge creek and 'forest' to explore. Lots of other kids to play and fight with. We were provided bows, arrows, rifles, black powder (for bombs!), tools, etc. Nobody ever lost a finger or toe or eye or whatever. I think we came out better for it.

I'm pretty sure if our parents allowed that sort of thing today, they'd be in jail and we'd be in foster care or something.
2014-03-21 08:43:04 AM  
1 votes:
FTA "I have memories of childhood so different from the way my children are growing up that sometimes I think I might be making them up, or at least exaggerating them."

True that.

I suppose one option would be to just let my kids out into the neighborhood willy-nilly and let them be. But if other parents don't follow suit, they would effectively be out there alone. I suppose having the world to explore alone with no one to get in the way of the resources kids are interested in exploiting for fun would be great from a ease of enjoyment standpoint, but then they don't learn to interact with their peers in striving after what others also want. Then there is the village awareness that isn't there in case something does go wrong. Used to be that if Billy or Sally did do something stupid, even if they didn't play with Joey or Susie, the neighborhood whisper chain would provide that Joey and Susie knew about it anyways, and therefore even if parents didn't know the information they needed to know in the event of a problem, it still existed within the neighborhood collective awareness and only had to be retrieved through some inquiry.
 
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