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(The Atlantic)   Hey, parents, leave them kids alone   (theatlantic.com) divider line 69
    More: Obvious  
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6157 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Mar 2014 at 8:54 AM (17 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-21 12:10:01 PM
That was a great article and I'd say it highlights one of the core reasons I am choosing not to have children in today's world.
 
2014-03-21 12:16:19 PM

InterruptingQuirk: WhatIsLongPork: Valiente: We built models and got high from the glue and paint, after which we would burn the models.

Wow, I thought I was the only one who did that! We would build model ships, set them on fire while floating in a pond, and sink them by shooting with BB guns.

We never built them, but would acquire them, and then strap them to bottle rockets and launch them.


I was a kid when cable TV was coming in, and that's how I scored a free-standing TV tower for my radio hobby. But apart from that, there were a LOT of old antennas going into the garbage. So my friends and I used to saw the antenna elements apart into four-foot "lances" and, complete with a burning piece of punk taped to the handlebars, would charge each other on bicycles firing stick rockets from the aluminum "lances". It was basically chicken with explosive. Hilarious, especially if you drove through a street hockey game firing off these things.

There's not a lot of street hockey these days, either.

Aside from the fact that I stopped doing this around the age of 16, when skirt, dope and beer became more compelling, this scene from Wayne's World exactly replicates hundreds of hours of my childhood:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzaZkdljxlo

Unsurprisingly, Mike Myers grew up about a mile north of me, and I eventually dated an ex of his older brother Peter, who ended up managing a Sears in Belleville or some damn place.
 
2014-03-21 12:19:31 PM
Yes, somehow we all survived:

-sat on Grandma's lap in the front seat, no seat belt (age 3).
-played "chicken" with the train that passed near my house
-smoked first cigarette at age 5! (big brother's idea, dad quit 2 years later, thank goodness)
-swam unattended with friends (age 5 onwards)
-walked to school alone (age 4 onwards)
-ran around the neighborhood unattended until dinner time
-no helmets or seat belts or cell phones\pagers.

wasn't it nice when kids were allowed to be kids, and adults did their own thing? If my folks had friends over, kids kept to themselves and let them entertain.  Nowadays kids have to be included or be the center of attention it seems.
 
2014-03-21 12:20:03 PM

redmid17: Valiente: redmid17: Miss Alexandra: I do have to keep a closer watch on my 12-year-old son due to his developmental delay/mild autism.  He's extremely outgoing and friendly.  That's good...but not if he winds up saying "hi" to some pervert.  He's smart, but social situations, that's another story.

He loves working with tools.  I get him old toys at Goodwill that he can take apart.  If I'm missing a screwdriver chances are it's in his room.  He knows what he can or can't take apart, so his TV is safe.  I can ask him to get me a Philips or flathead screwdriver and he knows what I'm talking about.

Is this something that some adults don't think a 12 year old boy would know? That would be sad and surprising for me.

Brace yourself, then. By which I mean very few kids today would know what a brace is of the non-dental variety.
[img.fark.net image 266x190]

Eh I'm not sure I've ever used one of those or even seen my dad use one. If we needed to hold something down or in place, we usually used a C clamp. I'm not exactly ancient either. I'm only 27. There is a world of difference between an augur brace and a screwdriver though.


And I just realized I'm an idiot for posting that. I remember seeing one of those in my parent's garage but we never used it.
 
2014-03-21 12:22:42 PM

InterruptingQuirk: Valiente: redmid17: Miss Alexandra: I do have to keep a closer watch on my 12-year-old son due to his developmental delay/mild autism.  He's extremely outgoing and friendly.  That's good...but not if he winds up saying "hi" to some pervert.  He's smart, but social situations, that's another story.

He loves working with tools.  I get him old toys at Goodwill that he can take apart.  If I'm missing a screwdriver chances are it's in his room.  He knows what he can or can't take apart, so his TV is safe.  I can ask him to get me a Philips or flathead screwdriver and he knows what I'm talking about.

Is this something that some adults don't think a 12 year old boy would know? That would be sad and surprising for me.

Brace yourself, then. By which I mean very few kids today would know what a brace is of the non-dental variety.
[img.fark.net image 266x190]

That looks like a drill to me. I've got one just like it. Is it properly called a brace?


It's called a carpenter's brace. An augur is used to dig post holes, as far as I know. A chest brace is this:

img1.etsystatic.com

Without the bracing part, it's just a plain old rotary hand drill. The carpenter's brace is surprisingly effective if you need to go through an 8 X 8 beam and most of them can rachet, meaning you don't need to make a full rotation. If you see a sort of trapezoidal bit end, it's probably for a carpenter's brace.
us.123rf.com
 
2014-03-21 12:25:27 PM

redmid17: Miss Alexandra: I do have to keep a closer watch on my 12-year-old son due to his developmental delay/mild autism.  He's extremely outgoing and friendly.  That's good...but not if he winds up saying "hi" to some pervert.  He's smart, but social situations, that's another story.

He loves working with tools.  I get him old toys at Goodwill that he can take apart.  If I'm missing a screwdriver chances are it's in his room.  He knows what he can or can't take apart, so his TV is safe.  I can ask him to get me a Philips or flathead screwdriver and he knows what I'm talking about.

Is this something that some adults don't think a 12 year old boy would know? That would be sad and surprising for me.


Remember I said he has a developmental delay and mild autism...?

When he was 2 a pediatrician specializing in childhood development said he didn't play with toys "with a purpose" and treated people as furniture--and she suggested medication later on.  Which I'm against.

Well, he's made quite a lot of progress and I don't drug him.  He's surprised his teachers with his progress.

So while I'd expect a *normal* 12-year-old to know this kind of thing, for my son, it's progress.
 
2014-03-21 12:41:34 PM

AppleDumplingGangster: wasn't it nice when kids were allowed to be kids, and adults did their own thing? If my folks had friends over, kids kept to themselves and let them entertain. Nowadays kids have to be included or be the center of attention it seems.


This seems to be a sea change in my history as well. I wonder what cultural influences have played out to affect this?
 
2014-03-21 12:48:37 PM

InterruptingQuirk: AppleDumplingGangster: wasn't it nice when kids were allowed to be kids, and adults did their own thing? If my folks had friends over, kids kept to themselves and let them entertain. Nowadays kids have to be included or be the center of attention it seems.

This seems to be a sea change in my history as well. I wonder what cultural influences have played out to affect this?


My guess - the advent of the internet has made it so that parents can, and do, hear about everything bad that can happen to a child. Things that used to be local stories that would probably have just been known to folks in the street something happened are now on news sites accessable from all over the world and are then blogged about by bloggers all over the world. With the occasional story getting picked up by national news if the 24 hour news cycle is hungry that day.

We see it here on FARK - something sad happens to a kid in Podunk, Nowhere and it's on Fark, REddit etc with people all over the world reading about it and commenting on it and reblogging it.

So instead of parents seeing something tragic happen to a kid once in a very rare while they are bombarded with stories, and opinions about stories, all the time. That's got to change people's hazard perception.
 
2014-03-21 12:57:37 PM

InterruptingQuirk: AppleDumplingGangster: wasn't it nice when kids were allowed to be kids, and adults did their own thing? If my folks had friends over, kids kept to themselves and let them entertain. Nowadays kids have to be included or be the center of attention it seems.

This seems to be a sea change in my history as well. I wonder what cultural influences have played out to affect this?


As someone commented earlier, when babies\kids became status symbols, they started to become protected\worshiped....that explanation makes the most sense to me...glad I got to grow up as a "kid" and not somebody's ego extension.   I often say: kids today need more lessons in disappointment.


\forgot to include we survived canal surfing as well
\\won't even mention the corporal punishment meted out at the private religious school
\\\no snowflakes for me, but lots of freshies :-)
 
2014-03-21 01:27:33 PM
This is why I don't have many friends who are parents.  Most parents annoy the piss out of me.  They either neglect and abuse their children or they're overprotective and ridiculous.

George Carlin said it best:
"Now, speaking of parents and speaking of bullshiat, two ideas that aren't always mutually exclusive, by the way, I'd like to mention a special kind of bullshiat that has taken hold in this country in the last thirty to forty years. It's a form of bullshiat that really can only be called 'child worship'. It's child worship. It's this excessive devotion to children.  I'm talking about today's professional parents, these obsessive diaper sniffers who are overscheduling and overmanaging their children and robbing them of their childhoods."
 
2014-03-21 01:41:34 PM
I have been waiting for this backlash nigh on 15 years.  It was bound to happen.  I was in the first generation where kids were coddled (the playgrounds were all made "safe" in my town when I was about 7).  Meanwhile, in our neighborhood the kids played in the creek without supervision.  We once boogie boarded down said creek after a severe thunderstorm because it seemed like fun.

By the time I got to college I noticed no one could cook even basic meals (as in make a sandwich), no one had any concept of taking care of themselves, and my hair kept getting mussed from all the air turbulence.  Eh, see? With the helicopters? Huh?  Ah, you'll laugh later.  These were the people that were constantly being shuttled to games and practice and lessons.  They never got to sit around the house and go "well NOW what am I gonna do?" and go made themselves a steak, pickle and bbq sauce sandwich because it seems like a good idea at the time.  Which it was...  I've got to make another one of those.

At age 18 I looked around and thought "we're boned".  It was apparent at 18 where this was going and I was stoned.  People aren't living with their parents until 25 because of economic problems, they're staying because they never learned to be on their own mom, dad, the RA, the university, etc always cleaned up their mess.

They've raised an entire generation of helpless people and they will likely never recover.
 
2014-03-21 02:01:50 PM

mike_d85: I have been waiting for this backlash nigh on 15 years.  It was bound to happen.  I was in the first generation where kids were coddled (the playgrounds were all made "safe" in my town when I was about 7).  Meanwhile, in our neighborhood the kids played in the creek without supervision.  We once boogie boarded down said creek after a severe thunderstorm because it seemed like fun.

By the time I got to college I noticed no one could cook even basic meals (as in make a sandwich), no one had any concept of taking care of themselves, and my hair kept getting mussed from all the air turbulence.  Eh, see? With the helicopters? Huh?  Ah, you'll laugh later.  These were the people that were constantly being shuttled to games and practice and lessons.  They never got to sit around the house and go "well NOW what am I gonna do?" and go made themselves a steak, pickle and bbq sauce sandwich because it seems like a good idea at the time.  Which it was...  I've got to make another one of those.

At age 18 I looked around and thought "we're boned".  It was apparent at 18 where this was going and I was stoned.  People aren't living with their parents until 25 because of economic problems, they're staying because they never learned to be on their own mom, dad, the RA, the university, etc always cleaned up their mess.

They've raised an entire generation of helpless people and they will likely never recover.


Alright Chicken Little.
 
2014-03-21 02:05:23 PM

redmid17: mike_d85: They've raised an entire generation of helpless people and they will likely never recover.

Alright Chicken Little.


Oh, let me be dramatic every once in a while.

/I also believe this is responsible for hipsters being obsessed with crafting and cooking.
 
2014-03-21 02:07:04 PM

mike_d85: redmid17: mike_d85: They've raised an entire generation of helpless people and they will likely never recover.

Alright Chicken Little.

Oh, let me be dramatic every once in a while.

/I also believe this is responsible for hipsters being obsessed with crafting and cooking.


It's not dramatic to worry about hipsters.
 
2014-03-21 02:11:46 PM
Let my little snowflake get dirty? Are you mad?
 
2014-03-21 02:18:22 PM

redmid17: It's not dramatic to worry about hipsters.


I think so.  They do love their costumes, so the dramatic arts are definitely involved.
 
2014-03-21 02:25:47 PM
Every time a site changes to that farked up mobile layout they get blacklisted in the hosts. I should start a pool for to determine when we'll be down to 3 working links a day.
 
2014-03-21 03:41:03 PM
One of the most scathing indictments of helicopter parenting ever turned into a satirical comedy song...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7eVr-IuvBI
 
2014-03-21 03:53:56 PM
Just go this month's issue in the mail:

img.fark.net
 
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