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(SFGate)   Waiting in line for a pay phone, scantrons, drinking from lead laced garden hoses...kids these days don't know what they're missing   (blog.sfgate.com) divider line 131
    More: Amusing, garden hose, waiting in line, drinks  
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5542 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2014 at 12:48 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-20 01:36:43 PM  

grinding_journalist: MrBallou: Too bad about the need for not letting them roam independently all day like we did as kids, but neighborhoods just aren't as safe from bad people as they used to be.

Myth.


Well, I guess that settles it then. Thanks.

Or see other comments in this thread. This stuff isn't just pulled out of some helicopter parent's tailpipe. The world has changed. That's why Amber Alerts are a real thing.
 
2014-03-20 01:38:43 PM  

bikerbob59: Cold_Sassy: PocketfullaSass: Sniffing fresh, purple mimeographed pages.

I always loved that.  And that white paste.  What's pica, you say?

That white paste stuff spelled great and tasted great.


You know it!
 
2014-03-20 01:40:09 PM  

doubled99: Too bad about the need for not letting them roam independently all day like we did as kids, but neighborhoods just aren't as safe from bad people as they used to be.


Perception, not reality


Right.  They were never safe.

Parents back in the day were just neglectful all around.  They didn't even reward their kids for showing up!

Not getting constantly rewarded really damages a kid's psyche.
 
2014-03-20 01:41:01 PM  
I remember the good ol' days when hose water tasted like liquid happy. When my shoestrings were gray from being caught in my bicycle gears. I remember hobbling home with blood pouring from both my knees and the wild fury that caused me to pop Kenney Farmer in the forehead with a shovel. I remember the glory of making a GI Joe encampment realistic with the liberal application of illegal fireworks and I remember finger-banging John's older sister down by the creek.

And I knew damn good & well that the Russkies didn't have the balls to try to stop me.
 
2014-03-20 01:41:22 PM  

Cold_Sassy: bikerbob59: Cold_Sassy: PocketfullaSass: Sniffing fresh, purple mimeographed pages.

I always loved that.  And that white paste.  What's pica, you say?

That white paste stuff spelled great and tasted great.

You know it!


Ever put a jar behind the radiator for a day to make it chewey?
 
2014-03-20 01:41:29 PM  
Glad to see scantrons haven't gone the way of the dodobird.

I'm guessing the author lives in a school district that got one of those iPad grants and just assumed that was how the rest of the world was working.

Did you guys know caller ID for a cable land line can show up on your TV now?  My dad has that and it blew me away.  Not that the technology is that impressive since all the services are on the same line, but that they bothered creating it.
 
2014-03-20 01:43:03 PM  

Sword and Shield: fsufan: pute kisses like a man: Bob Falfa: Most of those are correct, but why won't kids play darts? No explanation was given.

Because no kid (nor man) would be caught dead playing with that plastic crap with plastic tiped darts board set.

I still have a set of Jarts in the garage... now that was a game.

Amen! I'm a pretty decent darts player, but only on a traditional rope or cork dartboard. The plastic ones, I don't know why but I can't hit anything. The dart hits the plastic between the holes and bounces out.


Me and my brother got a plastic dart board when we were kids, dad tried it a few times and said "Fark it I'm getting you a real one" Sooooo much better, plus the real one we could play baseball on the back.
 
2014-03-20 01:45:26 PM  

Mikey1969: Sword and Shield: Amen! I'm a pretty decent darts player, but only on a traditional rope or cork dartboard. The plastic ones, I don't know why but I can't hit anything. The dart hits the plastic between the holes and bounces out.

I'm good enough that I had a bunch of Brits at an English pub compliment my playing one time. Plastic tipped darts suck the hog, that's for sure, and part of it's because half of the time they bounce out, just like you said. I refuse to play on those pieces of shiate.


Thirded

/still have my tungstens with custom flights somewhere around here
//loved that game
 
2014-03-20 01:45:51 PM  
I was told at an early age that in order for Abe Lincoln to watch television at night, he'd have to light candles to see.

/don't know why he couldn't just watch it on his telephone.
 
2014-03-20 01:46:26 PM  

MrBallou: The world has changed. That's why Amber Alerts are a real thing.


I'll give you your earlier point on people not looking after other people's kids as much. But that's more about responding to serious injury. Kidnappings of kids did happen before - Amber Alerts are a real thing because we have ways of informing more people more quickly now, which may lead to a happy ending from a horrible situation.

Mikey1969: Kids can't roam the neighborhoods anymore. Nobody pays any attention when they drive, and city streets are far more crowded than they were.


Generally, playing in the street isn't a great idea, and I would never suggest kids playing in city streets. I think there's a real difference if you live in a suburb that is actually sub-urban, or a small town-type suburb, surrounded by fields and forest. We recently moved to Mississippi from London. I would never ever have contemplated allowing kids to play in the streets in London.
 
2014-03-20 01:47:19 PM  

vudukungfu: Cold_Sassy: I always loved that.  And that white paste.  What's pica, you say?

Lawn darts.

And putting a Root Beer Fizzie on your tongue and holding it there until it is entirely dissolved.


OMG I totally forgot about fizzies - I loved them; our grammy always used to have them when we came over to visit.

/Also a proud Jart owner.  Even have the original box they came in.
 
2014-03-20 01:48:32 PM  
I don't miss most of the stuff listed in the article. A lot of things are much better today.
We used to roam the streets more than kids do now, but I think part of the reason is that kids today are more involved in structured activities like sports, dance class, etc., etc. Or they're in afterschool activities because both parents work. I can tell you from first hand experience that there were plenty of perverts roaming the streets in the olden days.
I'm going to go yell at a cloud now.
 
2014-03-20 01:48:54 PM  
I sure miss polio!
 
2014-03-20 01:49:52 PM  

groppet: Sword and Shield: fsufan: pute kisses like a man: Bob Falfa: Most of those are correct, but why won't kids play darts? No explanation was given.

Because no kid (nor man) would be caught dead playing with that plastic crap with plastic tiped darts board set.

I still have a set of Jarts in the garage... now that was a game.

Amen! I'm a pretty decent darts player, but only on a traditional rope or cork dartboard. The plastic ones, I don't know why but I can't hit anything. The dart hits the plastic between the holes and bounces out.

Me and my brother got a plastic dart board when we were kids, dad tried it a few times and said "Fark it I'm getting you a real one" Sooooo much better, plus the real one we could play baseball on the back.


darts aren't really that much of a threat anyways. i doubt you could even cause an injury that would require a hospital (except dart to the eye... but, a plastic dart to the eye would probably be about as bad).

but, the plastic darts did protect the walls.  and i sure as shiat wouldn't give my kids a real dart board to play with in a room i cared about.

/ i don't have kids, so i set up the dart board wherever i wanted.  because I don't miss the board.  much.  well, i was drunk all those times, doesn't count.
 
2014-03-20 01:51:19 PM  

snocone: Cold_Sassy: bikerbob59: Cold_Sassy: PocketfullaSass: Sniffing fresh, purple mimeographed pages.

I always loved that.  And that white paste.  What's pica, you say?

That white paste stuff spelled great and tasted great.

You know it!

Ever put a jar behind the radiator for a day to make it chewey?


Interesting, but it never occurred to me.  That, and the teacher would always put it away somewhere after the "art" portion of school day was over.
 
2014-03-20 01:52:46 PM  
In my opinion, it is less safe for kids to play outside now than it was when I was rowing up in the late 70s, early 80s.  It is less safe because there are less kids outside playing.  I knew that I could go to one of three or four places and find someone I knew as long as it was light out.  Now, most areas don't have that, as kids have too many planned activities, and other distractions.

If my daughters could go out and be with 10+ kids all day like I was, I would need to know where they were, the herd would protect them so to speak.  Now, unless kids are going to the mall, I don't see them walking anywhere.
 
2014-03-20 01:55:43 PM  

MrBallou: The world has changed. That's why Amber Alerts are a real thing.


Increased publicity / awareness does not equal increased frequency or severity, but if you like living in fear, knock yourself out.

The actual problem is that the *perception* of greater frequency / OMG EVERYONE IS A MONSTER has led to a demonstrated reduction in the willingness of strangers to help others, especially kids.  In contrast to the lack of increase in actual monsters in the world, there *has* been an increase in irrational / misguided / wrongheaded persecution of people who only looked at a distance like they might be doing something wrong, thanks to that incorrect idea that the world is a worse place "these days."

I try to be a nice guy, and happen to be a trained EMT (once  upon a time) and a reasonably handy mechanic... but there is *zero* chance I am going to help a crying kid on the side of the road, with a skinned knee and a bike with a dislodged chain.  Sucks, and makes me question myself, but it is what it is.

The even sadder bit is that -- in *actual* abduction / lost kid / at-risk situations, the best thing a kid could do is run to a stranger for help:  *Nearly*everyone* is decent at heart and willing to help a stranger.  In the "that guy is actually trying to hurt me" vs. "I don't know that guy" question, I know which one I'd pick, and which one I'd want a kid / friend / better half / etc to pick!  Same goes for the "I'm lost and scared and will figure it out myself" vs. "I'm lost and scared and will ask that stranger for help" question.  But, we're all taught/teaching, "don't talk to strangers!"  Wrongheaded.

Anybody mention "trying to catch the song you like on the radio, with the tape all cued up on a blank spot"?
 
2014-03-20 01:57:16 PM  

MrBallou: grinding_journalist: MrBallou: Too bad about the need for not letting them roam independently all day like we did as kids, but neighborhoods just aren't as safe from bad people as they used to be.

Myth.

Well, I guess that settles it then. Thanks.

Or see other comments in this thread. This stuff isn't just pulled out of some helicopter parent's tailpipe. The world has changed. That's why Amber Alerts are a real thing.


The world did change.  Everyone started actually paying attention to all this crap.  Don't forget that television only became commonplace 50 years ago.  Communication and news have permeated society significantly since the 1970s when cable and later the internet started providing information non-stop.  The same technology (telecommunications) also makes the amber alert systems possible.

You don't think kids went missing in the 30s and 40s?  Hell, all you had to do was get away from the scene and put some distance between you and the crime and you were basically scot free.  That's an exaggeration, but there was no fingerprinting, no security camera, no "Crimestoppers" hotline for the local TV, no footage of you robbing someone being broadcast over and over, plus jurisdiction was a bit harder until the FBI really got rolling in the cold war days.
 
2014-03-20 01:57:18 PM  

Zappagirl: Mikey1969: Kids can't roam the neighborhoods anymore. Nobody pays any attention when they drive, and city streets are far more crowded than they were.


Generally, playing in the street isn't a great idea, and I would never suggest kids playing in city streets. I think there's a real difference if you live in a suburb that is actually sub-urban, or a small town-type suburb, surrounded by fields and forest. We recently moved to Mississippi from London. I would never ever have contemplated allowing kids to play in the streets in Londo


The problem is that a lot of the suburbs are being swallowed up by the city. When I was a kid, travelling through the Salt Lake area, the metro area stretched pretty much as far as it does now, but the little suburb towns were all separated, and there wasn't cross city traffic through them. Now, there isn't even any kind of division between these towns, sometimes you're in 3 different towns in 5 blocks, and didn't even realize that you left the first one. It sucks. Somebody is always cutting through your neighborhood to shave 2 minutes off of their commute, but they barrel down your street like it's the friggin' interstate.
 
2014-03-20 02:00:46 PM  

Cold_Sassy: snocone: Cold_Sassy: bikerbob59: Cold_Sassy: PocketfullaSass: Sniffing fresh, purple mimeographed pages.

I always loved that.  And that white paste.  What's pica, you say?

That white paste stuff spelled great and tasted great.

You know it!

Ever put a jar behind the radiator for a day to make it chewey?

Interesting, but it never occurred to me.  That, and the teacher would always put it away somewhere after the "art" portion of school day was over.


Predated, eh?
The Single Jar Strategy was implemented after so many mysterious disappearances during the Everyone Has A Jar Days.
Go figure.

"Behind the radiator" was mine own personal chemistry lab for years.
 
2014-03-20 02:02:06 PM  

Mikey1969: I'm good enough that I had a bunch of Brits at an English pub compliment my playing one time.


Brits are darts SMEs.
 
2014-03-20 02:08:12 PM  
Sorry, Smitty but in some places kids will get to experience waiting in line for a payphone more than ever before.

Thanks to all the zero-tolerance policies we've been busy putting in place in order to create a criminal subclass.

There are payphones in jails and prisons that charge the person you're calling.
 
2014-03-20 02:08:34 PM  

SFSailor: MrBallou: The world has changed. That's why Amber Alerts are a real thing.

Increased publicity / awareness does not equal increased frequency or severity, but if you like living in fear, knock yourself out.


You sound like a child molester.

Kidding. I agree it sucks to have less confidence that the world is good. If that's a product of media fear-mongering there's not much way around it, unless you're comfortable with risking losing of your kid.

My kid is finally old enough that I'm pretty sure she can take care of herself if she needs to, so I now let her out of my sight. She always finds her way back, too.

Anybody mention "trying to catch the song you like on the radio, with the tape all cued up on a blank spot"?

My old car still has a cassette tape player, so she's seen it work but keeps mentioning stone tools and dinosaurs.
 
2014-03-20 02:08:39 PM  

liltingbanshee: I don't miss most of the stuff listed in the article. A lot of things are much better today.
We used to roam the streets more than kids do now, but I think part of the reason is that kids today are more involved in structured activities like sports, dance class, etc., etc. Or they're in afterschool activities because both parents work. I can tell you from first hand experience that there were plenty of perverts roaming the streets in the olden days.
I'm going to go yell at a cloud now.


This came up just last night.  My fiancé is in a class and privilege sociology class and they pointed out the difference between how lower classes, middle classes, and upper classes fill children's time.  She was surprised that we didn't have all of the structured activities as kids despite being decidedly middle class.

I had to remind her that these things were taking off when we were kids and we were probably just a year or two ahead of being one of the kids who never had permission to go roam the neighborhood.  Why yes, that's a birth year in my handle.
 
2014-03-20 02:09:55 PM  

snocone: Cold_Sassy: snocone: Cold_Sassy: bikerbob59: Cold_Sassy: PocketfullaSass: Sniffing fresh, purple mimeographed pages.

I always loved that.  And that white paste.  What's pica, you say?

That white paste stuff spelled great and tasted great.

You know it!

Ever put a jar behind the radiator for a day to make it chewey?

Interesting, but it never occurred to me.  That, and the teacher would always put it away somewhere after the "art" portion of school day was over.

Predated, eh?
The Single Jar Strategy was implemented after so many mysterious disappearances during the Everyone Has A Jar Days.
Go figure.

"Behind the radiator" was mine own personal chemistry lab for years.


What?  You got your own jar?  Dang.  We didn't even have a radiator.

You know what else they forgot in this thread?  The fact that TV stations used to go off the air at midnight and no TV until the next morning.
 
2014-03-20 02:12:57 PM  

Earl of Chives: In what part of the country did they fashion garden hoses out of lead?


Subby is so old he had to walk up the aqueduct to get to school BOTH WAYS.

www.roman-britain.org
 
2014-03-20 02:14:02 PM  

MrBallou: grinding_journalist: MrBallou: Too bad about the need for not letting them roam independently all day like we did as kids, but neighborhoods just aren't as safe from bad people as they used to be.

Myth.

Well, I guess that settles it then. Thanks.

Or see other comments in this thread. This stuff isn't just pulled out of some helicopter parent's tailpipe. The world has changed. That's why Amber Alerts are a real thing.


My guess is that those people yelling "myth" are rural types that that never stepped further than their county or one like it and have no idea of what the rest of the world is like.
 
2014-03-20 02:14:20 PM  

Cold_Sassy: snocone: Cold_Sassy: snocone: Cold_Sassy: bikerbob59: Cold_Sassy: PocketfullaSass: Sniffing fresh, purple mimeographed pages.

I always loved that.  And that white paste.  What's pica, you say?

That white paste stuff spelled great and tasted great.

You know it!

Ever put a jar behind the radiator for a day to make it chewey?

Interesting, but it never occurred to me.  That, and the teacher would always put it away somewhere after the "art" portion of school day was over.

Predated, eh?
The Single Jar Strategy was implemented after so many mysterious disappearances during the Everyone Has A Jar Days.
Go figure.

"Behind the radiator" was mine own personal chemistry lab for years.

What?  You got your own jar?  Dang.  We didn't even have a radiator.

You know what else they forgot in this thread?  The fact that TV stations used to go off the air at midnight and no TV until the next morning.


And only three channels!!  (Not including PBS)
 
2014-03-20 02:15:53 PM  

mike_d85: MrBallou: grinding_journalist: MrBallou: Too bad about the need for not letting them roam independently all day like we did as kids, but neighborhoods just aren't as safe from bad people as they used to be.

Myth.

Well, I guess that settles it then. Thanks.

Or see other comments in this thread. This stuff isn't just pulled out of some helicopter parent's tailpipe. The world has changed. That's why Amber Alerts are a real thing.

The world did change.  Everyone started actually paying attention to all this crap.


My wife has the theory that it's worse than it used to be because the internet lets like-minded perverts support and reinforce each others' sickness. A perv used to have to hide alone in the shadows. That probably kept him from acting, usually. Now he can find chatrooms full of people telling him they feel the same way and it's OK. That may make it easier to act on the feeling.
 
2014-03-20 02:16:54 PM  

AteMyBrain: Oh look...yet another article/video/blog entry reminding us that we didn't wear bike helmets. Ahhh...the good ol' days!

p.s. I'm firmly entrenched i middle age, and I never called my parents from a rotary phone.


Yeah ,me either . We didn't have a phone .
 
2014-03-20 02:20:37 PM  
My kids read the newspaper and marbles were pretty much dead when I was a kid, back in the seventies.
 
2014-03-20 02:22:38 PM  

Monkey2: Deslidedhttp://deslide.clusterfake.net/?o=html_table&u=http%3A%2F%2Fb log.sfgat e.com%2Fsfmoms%2F2014%2F03%2F19%2Fthings-you-did-as-a-kid-that-your-ki ds-will-never-do%2F%2321657101%3D0


I love you now.
 
2014-03-20 02:24:48 PM  
"Eat all the Halloween candy. Today's parents often pay their kids to toss their pile of sweets. "

Those parents are called "dickheads", and they will all end up in sh*tty nursing homes, each and every single one of them.
 
2014-03-20 02:40:08 PM  
I remember reaching into an open topped cooler, outside a store, on a hot, humid day, full of ice water and little chinks of ice, to grab a freezing cold, glass bottle of tasty Nehi Grape or Orange soda.

Then, with my arm nearly frostbitten, I'd pop the metal crimp cap off with the built in bottle opener and hear it clatter into the catch basin. Then I'd have a guzzle of that cold, cold, intensely delicious soda, wolfing it down so fast I'd nearly get brain freeze. The smooth, cold glass bottle top felt smooth and cool between my lips and might rattle against my teeth.

I was SOOOOOO good! It cost 10 cents plus a nickel deposit for the reusable bottle.

Often, such stores had asphalt parking lots, which were covered by thousands of bottle caps driven into the surface by car tires and shoes. It was traditional then, for the owner to come out, pop the cap collector off and toss the contents onto the tar in the hot, hot sun.

Eat all the Halloween candy. Today's parents often pay their kids to toss their pile of sweets.

Back then, we went out in groups around the neighborhood, as soon as dusk hit. All dressed up in costumes -- most of which were manufactured to be shiny and glitzy and last maybe the night, with a stiff, ill fitting plastic mask held on by an elastic band.

We held no fear of anything. Houses were decorated up, with adults often spending an astonishing amount of time to turn their yards and garages into deliciously scary, interactive scenes, with assorted scary music records on turn tables.

Adults were always around, each not only looking out for their own kids, but others. Sometimes we had to run to the car and swap bags because ours got so jam packed with candy and goodies.

The night was full of shouts and laughter, screams and joy, smelling of various candies and baked goods, along with that interesting scent of new costumes.

We went home tired and laden with 'loot'. It was dumped out on the carpet in the living room and sorted greedily, with our folks expertly managing to grab most of it to pack into glass gallon sized pickle jars 'for later'.

The night was always magical, mystical and wonderful. My Mom would always corral the pieces of fruit we would inevitably get from old men and ladies who didn't quite 'get it' and put it in a fruit bowl on the kitchen table.

Folks back then were generous with their handouts also. Not just one piece, but a handful.

It was a delightful time for a kid. None of us ever considered it 'evil', just fun.

Every boy I knew in school carried a small pocket knife. Even teachers. They were used for whittling, admiring, cutting string and so on, but never as a weapon in a fight. It was against the Kid Code of the time and considered really bad form. You never got suspended or tossed in jail for having one.

At one time, in High School, the PTA was considering sectioning off part of the commons to be used as a smoking place. They knew a lot of us kids smoked, but then, so did nearly every adult on campus. They were getting tired of kids sneaking smokes in the bathrooms and clogging up the urinals with butts. Plus, teachers confiscated so many packs of cigarettes from kids weekly that the office could have made money reselling them.

Mention doing such a thing today will probably get you drawn and quartered by the Smoke Nazi's.

I loved the smell of freshly mimeographed papers. Modern copiers have no souls because their in has no smell.

I took a class in typing, using old, manual standard Royal typewriters. Big, noisy, clunky things, requiring special erasers to correct mistakes, using greasy, ink filled cloth ribbons, with keys with metal print heads flashing about of metal arms. (Really, if you've ever seen one, especially inside, the mechanics involved are hideously complicated and unpowered, yet they could take thousands of hours of pounding before needing adjustment or repair.)

I just learned to hunt and peck faster. Never did grasp being able to type without looking at the keys.

NONE of your kids will ever be able to walk into a store, buy several pounds of grade A beef for under $2.00 a pound and slice it up and eat it raw if they like with NO FEAR of disease. We could. Raw hamburger also. Rare to us meant raw, with just some searing on the outside.

You could buy a quarter of a cow, sliced up and wrapped in butchers paper, for $75. They tossed in the bones for free to make soup.

Ahh, the good old days.
 
2014-03-20 02:44:40 PM  
Lived back in the sticks but stuff we did / had to endure:

- Party lines on the rotary phone
- Only 3 channels (2 in the summer) of TV because of crappy reception
- Ran around in the woods alone or with 1 or 2 other kids max from 4th grade on. Sometimes 2+ miles from home
- Biked on the road, or really crappy bikes. For miles. No helmets or any of that jazz. Sometimes played "bike polo" with sticks and an empty can
- Jarts
- Went out plinking with the .22 rifle
- Walked around for miles at night in the summer if it was clear and the moon near full

All this was when I could get away from having to do boring farm work like hoeing weeds or training bean runners or something equally monotonous.
 
2014-03-20 02:46:46 PM  
Add to the list ice skating on a pond or small lake or sledding pretty much anywhere decent.  Lawyers and all that.
 
2014-03-20 02:48:27 PM  
Good times. Good times.
 
2014-03-20 02:49:03 PM  
1. Waiting for the radio/tv/phonograph to "warm up"
2. Calling the local date+time number "At the tone, the time will be..."
3. Carbureted cars with manual chokes. Lots more reliable than the automatic bimetallic ones that came later.
4. Car seatbelts with optional shoulder belts that snapped into the buckle
5. "Operator, could you please bill this call to my home number?"
6. "Mail early in the day"
7. Paper routes
 
2014-03-20 02:52:53 PM  
Better times.
 
2014-03-20 02:58:06 PM  

grinding_journalist: MrBallou: Too bad about the need for not letting them roam independently all day like we did as kids, but neighborhoods just aren't as safe from bad people as they used to be.

Myth.

In contributing to this impression, you are part of the problem.


My grandfather was a district attorney back in the 1950's. He got his reputation by prosecuting a case where an alcoholic (and most likely bipolar) man abducted, sexually assaulted and murdered an 8 year old boy.The case was never in the newspaper or mentioned on the TV/radio local news: only talked about in quiet whispers in certain company. It was never discussed with family and I didn't get the details until after my grandfather passed away in the 1990's. For the longest time it was just known as "The Case".

Compare that to these days with situations like Hailey Owens in Springfield Missouri or any other case Nancy Grace sinks her teeth in to.
 
2014-03-20 03:02:06 PM  

Mikey1969: Zappagirl: Mikey1969: Kids can't roam the neighborhoods anymore. Nobody pays any attention when they drive, and city streets are far more crowded than they were.


Generally, playing in the street isn't a great idea, and I would never suggest kids playing in city streets. I think there's a real difference if you live in a suburb that is actually sub-urban, or a small town-type suburb, surrounded by fields and forest. We recently moved to Mississippi from London. I would never ever have contemplated allowing kids to play in the streets in Londo

The problem is that a lot of the suburbs are being swallowed up by the city. When I was a kid, travelling through the Salt Lake area, the metro area stretched pretty much as far as it does now, but the little suburb towns were all separated, and there wasn't cross city traffic through them. Now, there isn't even any kind of division between these towns, sometimes you're in 3 different towns in 5 blocks, and didn't even realize that you left the first one. It sucks. Somebody is always cutting through your neighborhood to shave 2 minutes off of their commute, but they barrel down your street like it's the friggin' interstate.


THIS

I have two daughters (5 and 4) and their school is about 2 blocks away. The streets between our house and the school are straight as an arrow and link a lot of the residential neighbourhoods with a number of the busier roads and commercial neighbourhoods (stores). Day and night people fly through that neighbourhood like the cops were chasing them.
 
2014-03-20 03:02:54 PM  

Cold_Sassy: The fact that TV stations used to go off the air at midnight and no TV until the next morning.


Date nights in Pittsburgh were Chiller Theater, with Chilly Billy. They stayed on the air until 1 AM.
You could grab some boob watching this while parents konked out upstairs.
 
2014-03-20 03:07:49 PM  
I had no idea that so many people actually played Jarts.
 
2014-03-20 03:08:36 PM  

UtileDysfunktion: [www.mikanet.com image 570x426]

/always wanted to give one of these to a teenager to see what they could make of it
//plenty of old movies and tv shows, they'd probably figure it out


Someone did just that

Kids are presented with rotary phones, and asked how they work. Hilarity ensues
 
2014-03-20 03:09:05 PM  

sendtodave: I had no idea that so many people actually played Jarts.


Good lord.
It was a fundamental thing.
Like a must have at parties.
 
2014-03-20 03:09:15 PM  
Cold_Sassy: The fact that TV stations used to go off the air at midnight and no TV until the next morning.

I remember getting up at like 5am to go deer or duck hunting with my, turning the TV on and none of the stations had gone on the air yet.
 
2014-03-20 03:10:19 PM  

vudukungfu: Cold_Sassy: The fact that TV stations used to go off the air at midnight and no TV until the next morning.

Date nights in Pittsburgh were Chiller Theater, with Chilly Billy. They stayed on the air until 1 AM.
You could grab some boob watching this while parents konked out upstairs.


You naughty man, you ;)
 
2014-03-20 03:13:41 PM  

sendtodave: I had no idea that so many people actually played Jarts.


Well, just think of it this way:  so many people were impaled (and I'm sure that was just a fraction of all players) that they got banned.  So, there were probably quite a few people who did.
 
2014-03-20 03:25:48 PM  

stevetherobot: My kids read the newspaper and marbles were pretty much dead when I was a kid, back in the seventies.


Marbles were popular when I was little... (early 80s) in my area. They went down in popularity after a number of parents slipped on the things (and confiscated them) but the NES launching killed marbles off entirely.

sendtodave: I had no idea that so many people actually played Jarts.


It was incredibly popular.
 
2014-03-20 03:29:13 PM  

Rik01: NONE of your kids will ever be able to walk into a store, buy several pounds of grade A beef for under $2.00 a pound and slice it up and eat it raw if they like with NO FEAR of disease.


Plenty of people of people could eat it without fear if they stayed uneducated and ignorant of food borne illnesses and diseases.

Like how they used to be.
 
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