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(Daily Mail)   NYC restaurant offers $250 Kobe beef burger with truffles, caviar and pancetta. Chicago tourists immediately declare that the $250 Jordan beef burger is better   (dailymail.co.uk ) divider line 51
    More: Strange, kobe, New York, heirloom tomato, Flight MH370, Johnny Weir, Secret sauce  
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720 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2014 at 10:20 AM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-20 08:37:14 AM  
It sounds disgusting and a waste of ingredients and money.
 
2014-03-20 08:39:42 AM  
The LeBron burger is $2.50 and comes with a side of Lake Erie swill water and a syphilitic Miami groupie.
 
2014-03-20 08:47:49 AM  
Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?
 
2014-03-20 08:53:58 AM  

Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?


I doubt they did.
 
2014-03-20 09:01:43 AM  
I didn't think America could get actual kobe beef
 
2014-03-20 09:08:43 AM  

scottydoesntknow: I didn't think America could get actual kobe beef


There is Kobe beef in America, but it's extremely rare and almost certainly not being used for burgers. If this restaurant is, in fact, making burgers, it's mixing a small amount of Kobe beef in with regular beef. They are not "importing Kobe beef patties" from Japan, and that's an absolute fact unless they can provide documentation otherwise.

Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?


Because simpletons will pay it. There are also simpletons who line up overnight to pay premium amounts for the newest gaming console that will almost certainly not work correctly when they get it home. But fools and their money are the foundation of any good market-driven economy.
 
2014-03-20 09:12:18 AM  
Meh, you can get this at a place called Duke's in Chicago for $100: one pound of pure kobe beef, topped with black truffle paste, 6 oz of sliced lobster tail, and 23 karat edible gold leaf, served on a pretzel bun
 
2014-03-20 09:22:55 AM  

Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?


It's not Kobe beef.  It's Kobe-like beef.
 
2014-03-20 09:25:43 AM  

scottydoesntknow: I didn't think America could get actual kobe beef


Not in quantities that a restaurant would need.  But American restaurants could take virtually any beef and call it anything they like.  That's why miniature rip-off burgers are called "sliders".  Because it sounds better.
 
2014-03-20 09:26:04 AM  
That looks f*cking vile.
 
2014-03-20 09:29:02 AM  
I don't understand Kobe beef burger.  The benefit of Kobe beef is that is is well marbled and tender, grinding it makes it so you can add all the fat and you break up the fibers, thereby allowing you to use just about any beef and get that characteristics you desire.
 
2014-03-20 09:36:36 AM  
why the fark would you ruin good caviar with all that shiat?
 
2014-03-20 10:15:50 AM  

Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?


That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.
 
2014-03-20 10:19:10 AM  
Why would you waste a good bun on that?
 
2014-03-20 10:28:36 AM  

Nabb1: Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?

That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.


plus actual kobe beef is like $350/lb. in japan.
 
2014-03-20 10:38:33 AM  

FlashHarry: Nabb1: Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?

That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.

plus actual kobe beef is like $350/lb. in japan.


If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.
 
2014-03-20 10:44:12 AM  

Nabb1: That was a ruse


A ruse? Brrring, brrring. Hello. Hi, it's the 1930's. Can we have our words and clothes and shiatty airplane back?
 
2014-03-20 10:47:15 AM  

Eskaminagaga: FlashHarry: Nabb1: Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?

That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.

plus actual kobe beef is like $350/lb. in japan.

If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.


I know of a place that has been selling a $15 Kobe beef burger for about 10 years.  It comes served with truffle oil fries.

/in case it's not well known, there are no truffles in truffle oil
 
2014-03-20 10:47:39 AM  

kronicfeld: Nabb1: That was a ruse

A ruse? Brrring, brrring. Hello. Hi, it's the 1930's. Can we have our words and clothes and shiatty airplane back?


1930s called?! Did you warn them about that Hitler guy?!
 
2014-03-20 10:49:48 AM  
Eskaminagaga:
If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.

So as the rare individual who has actually sampled true Kobe beef:  Does it live up to the hype?
 
2014-03-20 10:51:30 AM  
Anyone else notice there's more Kobe burgers than Kobe steak?

It's mostly pounded ground beef made into a loaf with transglutaminase meat glue, sliced off into patties, and at most places cooked to a shame. I know you're charging $15 for a product that should be super tender and flavorful, even if it's not really the product claimed, but don't serve me a blackened wafer and call it food.
 
2014-03-20 10:56:31 AM  

scottydoesntknow: I didn't think America could get actual kobe beef


Get regular prime beef and add enough fat to make it 65/35 or so, and call it Kobe beef. Kobe is just really tender meat with a lot o fat marbling. If you grind it up, you're kind of missing the point.
 
2014-03-20 10:58:45 AM  

kronicfeld: Nabb1: That was a ruse

A ruse? Brrring, brrring. Hello. Hi, it's the 1930's. Can we have our words and clothes and shiatty airplane back?


Sure. And watch out for hat Hitler fellow. He's a bad egg.
 
2014-03-20 11:02:37 AM  

nekom: Eskaminagaga:
If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.

So as the rare individual who has actually sampled true Kobe beef:  Does it live up to the hype?


It was pretty good, possibly tied as the best steak i have had with a steak i had at an Australian steakhouse, but i wouldn't pay as much for a steak again. It wasn't worth the price i paid for it (even at the lower price than in Tokyo). I really only bought it to try it and see how good it really is. I think the place i got it could have prepaired it better. They used an indoor propaine grill instead of a charcoal or wood grill.
 
2014-03-20 11:04:23 AM  

Eskaminagaga: If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.


interesting. yeah, the price i quoted was in tokyo, so i figure there's some inflation there. still... $80/lb... whoa.
 
2014-03-20 11:06:27 AM  

Eskaminagaga: I think the place i got it could have prepaired it better. They used an indoor propaine grill instead of a charcoal or wood grill.


25.media.tumblr.com

But they wanted you to taste the meat, not the heat!
 
2014-03-20 11:06:44 AM  

Eskaminagaga: FlashHarry: Nabb1: Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?

That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.

plus actual kobe beef is like $350/lb. in japan.

If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.


It's not really a trademark, anyway. Of all the heads of cattle produced in the Kobe prefecture, only 3,000 heads of cattle are certified as "Kobe beef" by the Japanese government. Under international trademark law, you cannot legally label a product that designates a region of origin if that is not where it came from. In most foreign countries, you cannot sell sparkling wine as "champagne" if it is not from Champagne in France. You can't sell cheese as parmesan cheese if it is not from Parma, Italy. And so on. But the US does not forbid this, hence, we see "champagne" from California and "parmesan" cheese from Wisconsin all the time, so there is nothing to stop restaurants from labeling some beef "Kobe" or the nonsensical "American Kobe" when it is obviously not the world-renowned Kobe beef. Frankly, I avoid buying anything labeled that because I can only guess at what it really is, but if I see certified Prime Black Angus on the menu, I know what I am getting.
 
2014-03-20 11:06:58 AM  
Walk past this place all the time and saw they had the window covered up for a new place. Good to know not to stop by for a drink.
 
2014-03-20 11:19:53 AM  

scottydoesntknow: I didn't think America could get actual kobe beef


I think you are right, we can't get it here in the usa because Japans production standards do not meet the usa's standards..
 
2014-03-20 11:28:43 AM  
What? Are you kidding me? You mean those Kobe sliders I had at bar in Fairfield, NJ, at almost $11 for a plate of 3, were not real??? Baistards.
 
2014-03-20 11:37:57 AM  
Nabb1:  but if I see certified Prime Black Angus on the menu, I know what I am getting.

I wouldn't after reading your own post. If names don't matter....
 
2014-03-20 11:41:40 AM  

Nabb1: Eskaminagaga: FlashHarry: Nabb1: Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?

That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.

plus actual kobe beef is like $350/lb. in japan.

If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.

It's not really a trademark, anyway. Of all the heads of cattle produced in the Kobe prefecture, only 3,000 heads of cattle are certified as "Kobe beef" by the Japanese government. Under international trademark law, you cannot legally label a product that designates a region of origin if that is not where it came from. In most foreign countries, you cannot sell sparkling wine as "champagne" if it is not from Champagne in France. You can't sell cheese as parmesan cheese if it is not from Parma, Italy. And so on. But the US does not forbid this, hence, we see "champagne" from California and "parmesan" cheese from Wisconsin all the time, so there is nothing to stop restaurants from labeling some beef "Kobe" or the nonsensical "American Kobe" when it is obviously not the world-renowned Kobe beef. Frankly, I avoid buying anything labeled that because I can only guess at what it really is, but if I see certified Prime Black Angus on the menu, I know what I am getting.


I usually see waygu, i almost never see kobe advertised any more.

but, if i see kobe advertised, i treat it with the same credibility as i treat krab.
 
2014-03-20 11:42:00 AM  
a.espncdn.com
What, you don't like my beef?
 
2014-03-20 11:43:50 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: Nabb1:  but if I see certified Prime Black Angus on the menu, I know what I am getting.

I wouldn't after reading your own post. If names don't matter....


the US has certification standards.  however, it does not have all the same point of origin standards.
 
2014-03-20 11:52:15 AM  
pute kisses like a man:
the US has certification standards.  however, it does not have all the same point of origin standards.

surrrrrre
 
2014-03-20 12:11:46 PM  

naughtyrev: Meh, you can get this at a place called Duke's in Chicago for $100: one pound of pure kobe beef, topped with black truffle paste, 6 oz of sliced lobster tail, and 23 karat edible gold leaf, served on a pretzel bun


Pickles?
 
2014-03-20 12:19:06 PM  
Subby, are you trying to start more food-related NYC vs. Chicago.... beef?
 
2014-03-20 12:27:21 PM  
Real Kobe beef may be exported to the USA now, but it's still highly likely that you would not be actually getting what you paid way too much for.

Source from the same author who wrote an exposé a couple years ago
 
2014-03-20 12:57:39 PM  

Nabb1: Eskaminagaga: FlashHarry: Nabb1: Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?

That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.

plus actual kobe beef is like $350/lb. in japan.

If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.

It's not really a trademark, anyway. Of all the heads of cattle produced in the Kobe prefecture, only 3,000 heads of cattle are certified as "Kobe beef" by the Japanese government. Under international trademark law, you cannot legally label a product that designates a region of origin if that is not where it came from. In most foreign countries, you cannot sell sparkling wine as "champagne" if it is not from Champagne in France. You can't sell cheese as parmesan cheese if it is not from Parma, Italy. And so on. But the US does not forbid this, hence, we see "champagne" from California and "parmesan" cheese from Wisconsin all the time, so there is nothing to stop restaurants from labeling some beef "Kobe" or the nonsensical "American Kobe" when it is obviously not the world-renowned Kobe beef. Frankly, I avoid buying anything labeled that because I can only guess at what it really is, but if I see certified Prime Black Angus on the menu, I know what I am getting.


No new wine from the US can use the term champagne as of 2006 onward. Not sure about the others. They had to have a specific controlled designation of Origin label under Madrid protocol I think
 
2014-03-20 01:32:07 PM  
For that price it should come with a handy from a topless waitress.
 
2014-03-20 01:34:23 PM  

Eskaminagaga: If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did).


How does it compare to top-of-the-line American beef? I just can't imagine cow from one part of the world really tastes significantly better than cow from another, to the point where it costs up to 100x more. I understand it can be damn fine beef, but my mind can't wrap around "100x better than American prime rib or filet mignon".
 
2014-03-20 01:37:31 PM  

USCLaw2010: Nabb1: Eskaminagaga: FlashHarry: Nabb1: Pokey.Clyde: Why the hell would you waste Kobe beef to make a farking burger?

That wasn't Kobe beef. That was a ruse to separate jackasses from their money. Kobe beef is not exported to the US. It was probably Wagyu, which is the same breed but raised domestically and really no better than Black Angus.

plus actual kobe beef is like $350/lb. in japan.

If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did). The fact is, the export of true Kobe beef outside the country is illegal according to Japanese law, but the term "Kobe beef" is not trademarked in any way, so any restauraunt can claim that they have "Kobe beef" (and do) despite the fact that it wouldn't even compare to true Kobe beef.

It's not really a trademark, anyway. Of all the heads of cattle produced in the Kobe prefecture, only 3,000 heads of cattle are certified as "Kobe beef" by the Japanese government. Under international trademark law, you cannot legally label a product that designates a region of origin if that is not where it came from. In most foreign countries, you cannot sell sparkling wine as "champagne" if it is not from Champagne in France. You can't sell cheese as parmesan cheese if it is not from Parma, Italy. And so on. But the US does not forbid this, hence, we see "champagne" from California and "parmesan" cheese from Wisconsin all the time, so there is nothing to stop restaurants from labeling some beef "Kobe" or the nonsensical "American Kobe" when it is obviously not the world-renowned Kobe beef. Frankly, I avoid buying anything labeled that because I can only guess at what it really is, but if I see certified Prime Black Angus on the menu, I know what I am getting.

No new wine from the US can use the term champagne as of 2006 onward. Not sure about the others. They had to have a specific controlled designation of Origin label under Madrid protocol I think


So is that bottle of Andre in the supermarket over eight years old or is the company making it breaking the law?
 
2014-03-20 03:29:16 PM  

skrame: Eskaminagaga: If you travel to the city of Kobe in Japan, you can get it as cheap as $80/lb (i did).

How does it compare to top-of-the-line American beef? I just can't imagine cow from one part of the world really tastes significantly better than cow from another, to the point where it costs up to 100x more. I understand it can be damn fine beef, but my mind can't wrap around "100x better than American prime rib or filet mignon".


It is hard to compare. American beef has a lot more substance and leaves you feeling more satisfied after a good meal. Also, the steak tends to have more of a smoky flavor than the one Kobe steak i had. I have had some delicious steaks in the USA, but the Kobe steak seemed a bit better than any steak i have had here, but i would not say 100x better.

The Kobe steak i had was prepaired medium rare (as i specified) and it was a pretty thin cut (compared to US and Australian steaks) served sliced (they sliced it after it was cooked). Each slice, as soon as i put it in my mouth, just seemed to melt in my mouth and break apart without me even chewing. It was really delicious and the taste was similar to a ribeye, but much more flavorful. It did not seem like it was seasoned much, so the flavor was strictly from the beef. I probably would have preferred a more smoky flavor to it as that is what i was used to, but it was still delicious and worth trying at least once.
 
2014-03-20 04:06:33 PM  
It's a cow named Kobe.
 
2014-03-20 06:43:22 PM  
I've never had it, so I can't say one way or the other.

My guess is that Kobe beef is good beef, but that it's really just a scam to get Tokyo yuppies to pay 300 bucks for a steak.
 
2014-03-20 08:53:53 PM  
Fine.
But to my understanding - and I think the info came from a WSJ article in the past two years -
Kobe beef is NOT sold outside of Japan.

Any comments?
 
2014-03-20 10:57:03 PM  

douchebag/hater: Fine.
But to my understanding - and I think the info came from a WSJ article in the past two years -
Kobe beef is NOT sold outside of Japan.

Any comments?


That's not quite true. Kobe beef can be exported in limited quantities, but there are some weird restrictions. The details were explained to be during a dinner at the temporarily closed (fire in an upstairs apartment) Juno in Chicago, but that was months ago, and I was already kinda drunk at the time.
 
2014-03-21 06:10:19 AM  

gerrymander: douchebag/hater: Fine.
But to my understanding - and I think the info came from a WSJ article in the past two years -
Kobe beef is NOT sold outside of Japan.

Any comments?

That's not quite true. Kobe beef can be exported in limited quantities, but there are some weird restrictions. The details were explained to be during a dinner at the temporarily closed (fire in an upstairs apartment) Juno in Chicago, but that was months ago, and I was already kinda drunk at the time.


No you can't get Kobe beef. You can get Wagu beef which is the breed of cow but it is like Champagne from France and Scotch from Scotland, anywhere else they are sparkling wine and malt whiskey. Odds are though the breeders of Wagu beef are not doing the whole massage/feed beer regimen that they do in Japan
 
2014-03-21 06:19:39 AM  
Actually to update. Fubegra posted this above

http://www.forbes.com/sites/larryolmsted/2014/01/07/the-new-truth-ab ou t-kobe-beef-2/

The skinny on it (pardon the pun) is that Kobe was not available in North America for two reasons:
1. Lack of slaughterhouses in Japan that met US standards. There was 1 that met the requirements
2. There are only 3-4000 cows a year that meet the "Kobe" designation. It is hard enough in Japan to find it let alone elsewhere.

So yes it is is available in very limited amounts and odds are the beef you get at the Cheesecake Factory is not Kobe even though they say it is.
 
2014-03-21 12:00:17 PM  
Well in fairness subby, the Jordon burger is 16 ounces of Miyazaki beef, Stilton cheese, Jamon Iberico Ham, and it's seasoned with a finishing salt derived from the sweat of Micheal Jordon.
 
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