If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(10 News)   San Diego isn't classy enough to support an opera company   (10news.com) divider line 71
    More: Sad, San Diego, operas  
•       •       •

1787 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2014 at 7:05 AM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



71 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-03-20 07:06:54 AM
GOP stronghold.
Culture is for pussies.
 
2014-03-20 07:10:28 AM
Its not over until the fat lady sings... Oh, she did sing and it's over.
 
2014-03-20 07:12:38 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: GOP stronghold.
Culture is for pussies.


Same with New York City, Boston, Cleveland, Baltimore, San Antonio and Orange County in the last few years.

Thanks Obama.

/was Frank in the now-moribund GCO's  Die Fledermaus in 2008
 
2014-03-20 07:17:40 AM

MBooda: HotIgneous Intruder: GOP stronghold.
Culture is for pussies.

Same with New York City, Boston, Cleveland, Baltimore, San Antonio and Orange County in the last few years.

Thanks Obama.

/was Frank in the now-moribund GCO's  Die Fledermaus in 2008


Oper rage is the ugliest sort of rage, MBooda.
 
2014-03-20 07:22:25 AM

monty666: MBooda: HotIgneous Intruder: GOP stronghold.
Culture is for pussies.

Same with New York City, Boston, Cleveland, Baltimore, San Antonio and Orange County in the last few years.

Thanks Obama.

/was Frank in the now-moribund GCO's  Die Fledermaus in 2008

Oper rage is the ugliest sort of rage, MBooda.


Hey, we had a fat lady. We were genuine.
www.dennisfrati.com
/fat gentlemen too, as you see
//me far left, in bathrobe
///tenor-baritone if anyone's interested
 
2014-03-20 07:24:53 AM
Alternate every opera with a Broadway musical. It'll pucker their sphincters, but it'll work.
 
2014-03-20 07:26:33 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: GOP stronghold.
Culture is for pussies.


GOP? WUT? Must have changed allot since I was stationed there in the 90's. Solidly Liberal then.
 
2014-03-20 07:29:30 AM
When I was a little kid the local school district in San Diego put up this deal where a student could get season tickets to the Opera and the Symphony at a huge discount. My folks bought the tickets and we spent the next season going to the Symphony at least once a week. This included The Nutcracker, the Ring of the Nibelung, several really good guest concerts with Van Cliburn and Issac Stern, etc. We were the only people in the whole school to buy those tickets.

It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.
 
2014-03-20 07:34:33 AM
That really sucks.  My niece sings in the San Diego Opera.  f*ck them.
 
2014-03-20 07:37:02 AM

MBooda: monty666: MBooda: HotIgneous Intruder: GOP stronghold.
Culture is for pussies.

Same with New York City, Boston, Cleveland, Baltimore, San Antonio and Orange County in the last few years.

Thanks Obama.

/was Frank in the now-moribund GCO's  Die Fledermaus in 2008

Oper rage is the ugliest sort of rage, MBooda.

Hey, we had a fat lady. We were genuine.
[www.dennisfrati.com image 671x412]
/fat gentlemen too, as you see
//me far left, in bathrobe
///tenor-baritone if anyone's interested


It actually looks like none of them ever passed up the opportunity to eat an entire cured ham on their own.

And bass guy in front looks he's wielding an oar, furiously trying to get away from this impending disaster.
 
2014-03-20 07:40:22 AM
I went to school (Grade through High) in Poway, a suburb of San Diego. In middle school (6-8) there was a class you could take that got to go to the dress rehearsals of operas, ballet, symphony and other cultural performances in San Diego. They put the kids on a bus, had chaperones, the whole thing was done for all the schools in SD that wanted in. They would fill the halls with kids. It was great, I got to watch the entire Ring series, swan lake, any number of symphonies, etc.

The best part was that the class was to study and understand the thing we would be watching. Kids showed up knowing the plot and with an understanding of the performance and who was performing or conducting. You would hear kids from all over SD standing around in the lobby during intermission talking about the plot (ballet or opera) or symphony and what was happening on stage with more knowledge than some of the adults.

And all at reduced cost to the parents so the kids could go. I was involved, my brother passed. (He is a jerk to this day, doesn't understand anything but sports and beer.)

Sadly, the program was dropped a couple of years after I left middle school due to lack of participation. I was just in that golden group who got the best of the education years.
 
2014-03-20 07:41:54 AM
Can we still gather around Mr. Spreckels' giant organ?

/that's not a Filner joke
 
2014-03-20 07:48:50 AM
Fark you, Whale's Vaginal!
 
2014-03-20 07:50:55 AM
Well, I'm not sure what politics has to do with the downfall of opera. Opera seems to have an image problem - the snob factor.  It's always appears to be sponsored by and attended by the wealthy.  Unless you grew up with it or were exposed to it, I don't see how opera appeals to a wider contemporary audience. It's in a different language, people dress up (usually) to attend, there are strange customs or manners to adhere to when attending the opera.... it's all sort of not-accessible and maybe intimidating to newbies.

Musicals, broadway and off-broadway shows on the other hand....
 
2014-03-20 07:59:10 AM
img3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-03-20 08:04:24 AM
How them Padres doin'?
 
2014-03-20 08:05:07 AM
No opinion on this, but I will say Imperial Beach is the most beautiful I've ever been on in my life.
 
2014-03-20 08:08:21 AM

Cold_Sassy: No opinion on this, but I will say Imperial Beach is the most beautiful I've ever been on in my life.



O'rly

o1.aolcdn.com
 
2014-03-20 08:08:33 AM

Deathfrogg: It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.


Ludwig van Beethoven.

/Pet peeve.
 
2014-03-20 08:09:37 AM

Deathfrogg: Cold_Sassy: No opinion on this, but I will say Imperial Beach is the most beautiful I've ever been on in my life.


O'rly

[o1.aolcdn.com image 442x295]


I sure didn't see that part.  Must've been on the front side.
 
2014-03-20 08:10:44 AM

MBooda: HotIgneous Intruder: GOP stronghold.
Culture is for pussies.

Same with New York City, Boston, Cleveland, Baltimore, San Antonio and Orange County in the last few years.

Thanks Obama.

/was Frank in the now-moribund GCO's  Die Fledermaus in 2008


And in a lot of cities, the opera, symphony, ballet, etc. are all operating at a deficit. Sometimes even when they are selling out most performances.

/costs are costly
 
2014-03-20 08:10:45 AM

batlock666: Deathfrogg: It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.

Ludwig van Beethoven.

/Pet peeve.


Camper van Beethoven

/Pet peeve
 
2014-03-20 08:13:43 AM
Probably not gay friendly enough that's the reason for closing.

/Ha!
 
2014-03-20 08:21:32 AM

Deathfrogg: It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.


Agreed.  Find me a form as mathematically complex, as harmonically interesting, and as elevating as a Bach fugue anywhere in any contemporary genre.

I view this are being one symptom in a larger decline in society, however.  If one looks at art, literature, architecture, furniture, clothing, and even food, we have lost much of the art and elegance of previous eras.  I can build fine furniture but the market is miniscule because very few appreciate the quality of craftsmanship.  Fine clothing and an understanding of fabric and fashion has been replaced by sweatpants and T-shirts - even in business and church.

I take heart in the resurgence of craft brewing and the farm-to-table movement in food.  Even the food channels on TV are promoting an awareness of what's on your plate and how it got there.  America is reclaiming the notion of craft and artistry in those two areas.  Even "the great unwashed" are participating in significant numbers.  We can hope that mindset spreads to other areas of cultural life as well.  Would it not be a happy day if San Diego Opera was able to announce, a few years down the road, that they were returning by popular demand?
 
2014-03-20 08:27:38 AM

SirEattonHogg: Well, I'm not sure what politics has to do with the downfall of opera. Opera seems to have an image problem - the snob factor.  It's always appears to be sponsored by and attended by the wealthy.  Unless you grew up with it or were exposed to it, I don't see how opera appeals to a wider contemporary audience. It's in a different language, people dress up (usually) to attend, there are strange customs or manners to adhere to when attending the opera.... it's all sort of not-accessible and maybe intimidating to newbies.

Musicals, broadway and off-broadway shows on the other hand....


Unmitigated crap. Next time you're in New York, drop in to the Met. You won't see a hell of a lot of dinner jackets or strange customs. Lovely, friendly house.
Intimidation is in the eye of the beholder.

Shame about the San Diego opera. We lost the New York City opera recently.
 
2014-03-20 08:35:22 AM

Mr. Right: I can build fine furniture but the market is miniscule because very few appreciate the quality of craftsmanship.


I disagree with this,  the market for this is minuscule because of the prices you'd have to charge for it.  The prices for such quality are affordable to only a few well off people.

It's the same with older architecture,  it was either built by slaves or by paying very low wages.  The level of craftsmanship is still available but it's costs would put it out or reach for most projects today.  So again it becomes available only to the well off few.

Isn't this how a lot of these operas and classical music came in to being to begin with?  Wealthy private patrons paying an artist to come up with works just for them?  Paintings were the same way at a time were they not?  It's great that our society has advanced enough that it can make these things available to as many people as it does today,  and hopefully we keep building on that.
 
2014-03-20 08:35:49 AM
Yet, Hagerstown, Maryland is.  http://www.huboperaensemble.org/p/upcoming-projects.html

Go figure.
 
2014-03-20 08:43:24 AM

Tellingthem: batlock666: Deathfrogg: It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.

Ludwig van Beethoven.

/Pet peeve.

Camper van Beethoven

/Pet peeve

img.fark.net

Pet peeve
 
2014-03-20 08:45:42 AM
I think all opera houses should start performing Klingon Opera.  The way Star Trek conventions are sold out it couldn't hurt...

MEEE  -  LOOOOOOOO  -  TAAAAAA!!!!!!
 
2014-03-20 08:52:45 AM

Mr. Right: Deathfrogg: It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.

Agreed. Find me a form as mathematically complex, as harmonically interesting, and as elevating as a Bach fugue anywhere in any contemporary genre.


I'm not disagreeing with you guys at all (I love Debussy myself).

But the lack of interest in today's youth may have something to do with the fact that Beethoven and Bach don't have videos with a huge party on the block, lotsa half-naked chicks rolling around in jello, tons of bling, big wads of cash, or cars bouncing on air shocks.

/but I would kinda like to see Ludwig and Johan sportin' some grills
//boyeeeees
 
2014-03-20 08:54:02 AM
Tillmaster:
Well, I'm not sure what politics has to do with the downfall of opera. Opera seems to have an image problem - the snob factor.  It's always appears to be sponsored by and attended by the wealthy.  Unless you grew up with it or were exposed to it, I don't see how opera appeals to a wider contemporary audience. It's in a different language, people dress up (usually) to attend, there are strange customs or manners to adhere to when attending the opera.... it's all sort of not-accessible and maybe intimidating to newbies.

Musicals, broadway and off-broadway shows on the other hand....

Unmitigated crap. Next time you're in New York, drop in to the Met. You won't see a hell of a lot of dinner jackets or strange customs. Lovely, friendly house.
Intimidation is in the eye of the beholder.

Shame about the San Diego opera. We lost the New York City opera recently.


The only city I've gone to the opera numerous times is SF.  And maybe it was the eye of the beholder, but it was very pretentious.

Maybe it's different in NYC.
 
2014-03-20 08:57:18 AM
Opera is niche market so would it be worth having the CIty of San Diego fund the Opera?

When you are deciding how to spend the tax payer's money remember their pockets are finite. If you fund opera where do you cut funding? Mental Health services? Libraries? Emergency Services? Student Bus Passes? Beach Maintenance? City Employee benefits?

San DIego Fiscal Year 2014 Adopted Budget


Or should those who actually go to/patrons of the art fund their art alone?
 
2014-03-20 09:01:02 AM
Mr. Right.   Deathfrogg: It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.


encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com
 
2014-03-20 09:07:23 AM
Today, the news cycle in Oz was gloating about the closure of the NYC Opera and how Madama Butterfly is about to be staged on Sydney Harbour. But all does not seem as rosy as the teevee news would have us believe.

$10M bucks to stage this thing. Crikey. Dunno how long the season is. It's only going ahead thanks to a rich Jap sponsor.

And of course, the farking leftard unions are causing trouble and sinking the boot in. I'm sure Mr Handa loves all the strife and can't wait to get his cheq book out for next year.

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/opera/fears-rise-the-fat-lady-is -s inging-final-aria-on-sydney-harbour-20140319-352wl.html
 
2014-03-20 09:43:22 AM

hasty ambush: Opera is niche market so would it be worth having the CIty of San Diego fund the Opera?

When you are deciding how to spend the tax payer's money remember their pockets are finite. If you fund opera where do you cut funding? Mental Health services? Libraries? Emergency Services? Student Bus Passes? Beach Maintenance? City Employee benefits?

San DIego Fiscal Year 2014 Adopted Budget


Or should those who actually go to/patrons of the art fund their art alone?


What about bringing art and pleasant cultural events to poor people? Governments have always had an interest in arts and culture, and usually they fund them through taxes on the wealthiest.
 
2014-03-20 09:53:11 AM

Boo_Guy: Mr. Right: I can build fine furniture but the market is miniscule because very few appreciate the quality of craftsmanship.

I disagree with this,  the market for this is minuscule because of the prices you'd have to charge for it.  The prices for such quality are affordable to only a few well off people.

It's the same with older architecture,  it was either built by slaves or by paying very low wages.  The level of craftsmanship is still available but it's costs would put it out or reach for most projects today.  So again it becomes available only to the well off few.

Isn't this how a lot of these operas and classical music came in to being to begin with?  Wealthy private patrons paying an artist to come up with works just for them?  Paintings were the same way at a time were they not?  It's great that our society has advanced enough that it can make these things available to as many people as it does today,  and hopefully we keep building on that.


Your argument has some merit but a few holes. If I built a desk for you, it may cost a lot more than Ikea or Sauder but it would last for your lifetime and your children's and grandchildren's, rather than abandoning it when your lease expires and you move to a new apartment because it wouldn't withstand the rigors of moving.

When I was young and setting up housekeeping, I scrimped and saved to buy really good kitchen utensils instead of following my mother's habit of buying whatever she could get in the housewares aisle at the grocery store.  I grew up using that crap (because if there was anything mom hated more than parting with a nickel it was cooking) and hated it.  She criticized me for "squandering" money.  But 45 years later, I'm still using the same Creuset pots and pans, the same Sabatier, Wusthoff and Dexter knives, the same copper bowls, the same cast iron skillets while she has spent a small fortune constantly replacing crap.

Artists were originally employed by the aristocracy because the aristocracy owned everything that the church (another cradle of the arts) hadn't laid claim to in order to save the aristocracy's souls from hell.  Until the rise of private property, serfs had no means of paying for a concert ticket, hence patronage.

But moving forward to today, I see people eagerly paying a hundred dollars or more a ticket for a chance to see Justin Bieber while they argue that the symphony is too expensive.  BTW, the cheap seats at our local Grand Rapids Symphony can be had for $18.  To me, that is incomprehensible.
 
2014-03-20 09:54:35 AM
This gives me a sad. I go to SD about this time of year most years for a conference. Every time I've tried to catch an opera performance there and every time the timing's not worked. Oh well.

The demographic trend for opera is horrible.  I'm 51 and I'm pretty consistently well below the median age when I attend performances.  That's a real bad sign. Perhaps things like the Met theater broadcasts will help a bit as it's a far cheaper and less socially awkward way to expose kids to opera.  But I think we're looking at a situation where in twenty years there's just a handful of permanent opera companies and a few traveling entities.
 
2014-03-20 10:01:18 AM

ristst: Mr. Right: Deathfrogg: It really is a sad state of affairs when people would rather listen to computer-generated synthetic crap than Antonio Vivaldi or Ludwig von Beethoven.

Agreed. Find me a form as mathematically complex, as harmonically interesting, and as elevating as a Bach fugue anywhere in any contemporary genre.

I'm not disagreeing with you guys at all (I love Debussy myself).

But the lack of interest in today's youth may have something to do with the fact that Beethoven and Bach don't have videos with a huge party on the block, lotsa half-naked chicks rolling around in jello, tons of bling, big wads of cash, or cars bouncing on air shocks.

/but I would kinda like to see Ludwig and Johan sportin' some grills
//boyeeeees


You have a point  but I think a large part is unfamiliarity because kids aren't exposed to it.  Pop music has done a great job of selling itself and it has not been shy at taking potshots at the stuffiness of symphonies and operas.  Kind of like, why should you go to a local restaurant and get a great, well-prepared meal from local ingredients but maybe have to wait a few minutes (and actually engage in coversation with your dinner partners) when you can go to the local chain sports bar and know exactly what you're going to get (even though it is mass-produced, nukeable crap) while watching the game and the scantily clad wait staff.  No intellectual effort or personal interaction required.
 
2014-03-20 10:06:35 AM

vernterv: That really sucks.  My niece sings in the San Diego Opera.  f*ck them.


WAT???
 
2014-03-20 10:10:52 AM

Mr. Right: Boo_Guy: Mr. Right:

Your argument has some merit but a few holes. If I built a desk for you, it may cost a lot more than Ikea or Sauder but it would last for your lifetime and your children's and grandchildren's, rather than abandoning it when your lease expires and you move to a new apartment because it wouldn't withstand the rigors of moving.

When I was young and setting up housekeeping, I scrimped and saved to buy really good kitchen utensils instead of following my mother's habit of buying whatever she could get in the housewares aisle at the grocery store.  I grew up using that crap (because if there was anything mom hated more than parting with a nickel it was cooking) and hated it.  She criticized me for "squandering" money.  But 45 years later, I'm still using the same Creuset pots and pans, the same Sabatier, Wusthoff and Dexter knives, the same copper bowls, the same cast iron skillets while she has spent a small fortune constantly replacing crap.

Artists were originally employed by the aristocracy because the aristo ...


I definitely agree with you both about good furniture.  When I was furnishing my first house and couldn't afford much else, on Fridays I would head out to the local auction house and just wait for good pieces of furniture, some of which I'd get for an astoundingly small amount (even more if you hang around to the end of the night.)  FF 20+ years and I still have it all, and people often compliment what beautiful pieces they are.

/Fark Ikea and Souder
 
2014-03-20 10:11:39 AM
I direct a small opera company, and while it's always sad to see a company go, I've never seen a well managed company/orchestra/theatre who understood the business of the arts fold. Ever. Usually the reasons these organizations fail is because people's heads are way too far up their own asses.

For example...
New York Opera needs 10 Farking Million to stage one production of Madama Butterfly?!?! Do you know what a waste that is? Do you know how many farking lives can be touched with the arts in a significant way for that much money? Instead they want to waste it on a vanity project.

In my company, if we can't afford to do it, then we do something else. Sustainability FTW.
 
2014-03-20 10:24:24 AM

Deathfrogg: Cold_Sassy: No opinion on this, but I will say Imperial Beach is the most beautiful I've ever been on in my life.


O'rly


Probably thinking of Silver Strand. IB is a toilet. Literally. When TJ river floods its the first beach to close do to fecal contamination. Happens several times a year.
 
2014-03-20 10:32:23 AM

SirEattonHogg: Well, I'm not sure what politics has to do with the downfall of opera. Opera seems to have an image problem - the snob factor.  It's always appears to be sponsored by and attended by the wealthy.  Unless you grew up with it or were exposed to it, I don't see how opera appeals to a wider contemporary audience. It's in a different language, people dress up (usually) to attend, there are strange customs or manners to adhere to when attending the opera.... it's all sort of not-accessible and maybe intimidating to newbies.

Musicals, broadway and off-broadway shows on the other hand....


There's a difference between image and perception.

Thanks to Hollywood, the perception of opera and classical music is that everyone who attends does so in a tux for a gala event.

Reality: as a subscriber to the Met in NYC and a few other orchestras, the only people wearing suits are coming from work. Probably half the audience is in jeans. In the winter there are more sweaters than dress shirts.

Let me put it this way: people get as dressed up for opera as they do for a restaurant, which is not dressed up at all.

And as for the cost, my family has had season tickets to an NFL team since the 1970s; that has always cost way more.

If I were running an opera company, I'd do a lot of marketing to make the case that it's much more casual and affordable than people think.

And as for Broadway, that costs way more than opera and sports. Broadway shows tend to be very savvy at dynamically pricing tickets. There's a reason why people wait in line for 4 hours at TKST for discount tickets.
 
2014-03-20 10:33:03 AM
Ugh, gawd.  Thanks for that info.

The part I was on was near the  air force base and what I remember was they the sand ( or whatever ) appeared to be gold flakes and it was beautiful.  I stayed at the Horton Grand Hotel, so whatever that's near, although they did warn us not to go out at night. This was some time ago, but the beach was very clean and pretty and I did not see one piece of trash...
 
2014-03-20 10:35:59 AM

Por que tan serioso: Deathfrogg: Cold_Sassy: No opinion on this, but I will say Imperial Beach is the most beautiful I've ever been on in my life.


O'rly

Probably thinking of Silver Strand. IB is a toilet. Literally. When TJ river floods its the first beach to close do to fecal contamination. Happens several times a year.



Only the east half of IB is a toilet, from about 16th. The west half and the coast is pretty nice, classic beach city. They just built a new resort on the beach as well, the city is trying to revitalize.
 
2014-03-20 10:49:01 AM
Boy, I hope they can still afford these guys:

www.billdanoff.com
 
2014-03-20 10:50:13 AM

saberXray: I direct a small opera company, and while it's always sad to see a company go, I've never seen a well managed company/orchestra/theatre who understood the business of the arts fold. Ever. Usually the reasons these organizations fail is because people's heads are way too far up their own asses.

For example...
New York Opera needs 10 Farking Million to stage one production of Madama Butterfly?!?! Do you know what a waste that is? Do you know how many farking lives can be touched with the arts in a significant way for that much money? Instead they want to waste it on a vanity project.

In my company, if we can't afford to do it, then we do something else. Sustainability FTW.


Kudos on managing a successful opera company.  But I do have to ask, in partial defense of New York Opera (are you referring to the bankrupt NY City opera?) how many different unions you are forced to employ in order to stage your operas?   The electricians, grips, sound engineers, construction crew, costumers, etc. typically all make a lot more than the average chorus musician.  Orchestral musicians cost a lot of money just for rehearsals before the first ticket is sold.

Which is not to say that a lot of opera companies are not mismanaged.  We are fortunate, in West Michigan, to have a lot of wealthy philanthropists who support the arts.  They also have representation on the various boards of directors to hire and advise good management.  The result is a pretty darned good artistic community for a market our size.  While the the groups are not always flush, they thrive.  Those of us who love to attend love those philanthropists.
 
2014-03-20 10:52:34 AM
Go fark yourself, San Diego.
 
2014-03-20 11:06:24 AM

thornhill: Thanks to Hollywood, the perception of opera and classical music is that everyone who attends does so in a tux for a gala event.


For huge numbers of olde pharts in the country, their only exposure to opera was a picture of JFK and Jackie at the opera that appeared in one of the news magazines back in the 60s.  He was attired in White-Tie and Tails, she in an elegant ball gown.  Times have changed drastically.  Here in the Midwest, at a performance of Turandot a few years back, I sat next to a  young woman wearing bib overalls.  They didn't smell like they had been overly exposed to laundry detergent since her last work shift, which was apparently at a goat dairy.  The rest of her, however, was neat, clean and quite attractive.  What made sitting next to her more than tolerable, if not completely enjoyable, was the fact that she was obviously transported by the music.  That is what it is all about.  If her attire was any indication of her income, I'd guess she sacrificed a bit to be there.  I'd also guess that few in that hall were as moved and as appreciative as she.
 
2014-03-20 11:15:24 AM

Mr. Right: thornhill: Thanks to Hollywood, the perception of opera and classical music is that everyone who attends does so in a tux for a gala event.

For huge numbers of olde pharts in the country, their only exposure to opera was a picture of JFK and Jackie at the opera that appeared in one of the news magazines back in the 60s.  He was attired in White-Tie and Tails, she in an elegant ball gown.  Times have changed drastically.  Here in the Midwest, at a performance of Turandot a few years back, I sat next to a  young woman wearing bib overalls.  They didn't smell like they had been overly exposed to laundry detergent since her last work shift, which was apparently at a goat dairy.  The rest of her, however, was neat, clean and quite attractive.  What made sitting next to her more than tolerable, if not completely enjoyable, was the fact that she was obviously transported by the music.  That is what it is all about.  If her attire was any indication of her income, I'd guess she sacrificed a bit to be there.  I'd also guess that few in that hall were as moved and as appreciative as she.


I think the fact that so many classical music organizations have a hard time raising money reflects how middle class most of their patrons are.
 
Displayed 50 of 71 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report