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(Slate)   Woman documents her life and descent into dementia   (slate.com) divider line 71
    More: Sad, dementia, primary care physicians, gender studies, Afrikaans, Dillard's, John Locke, Ph.D. in English, documents  
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10448 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Mar 2014 at 12:55 AM (18 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-19 10:17:36 PM
That what all these Fark comments of mine are for.
 
2014-03-20 12:14:20 AM
Or, what it's like after a long career as a writer for Slate
 
2014-03-20 12:52:40 AM
What I found amazing was that no matter how much I scrolled, the scrollbar indicator only ever moved the tiniest little bit.
 
2014-03-20 12:57:44 AM
Sorry, Mom, that's the penalty for spawning a bunch of evil farkers.
 
2014-03-20 01:01:34 AM
Been done.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-03-20 01:04:37 AM
img.4plebs.org
 
2014-03-20 01:05:39 AM
keithroysdon.files.wordpress.com

//too obscure for Fark.
 
2014-03-20 01:07:14 AM

Harry_Seldon: [keithroysdon.files.wordpress.com image 500x287]

//too obscure for Fark.


Dr. Demento is obscure?
 
2014-03-20 01:07:41 AM

Harry_Seldon: [keithroysdon.files.wordpress.com image 500x287]

//too obscure for Fark.


They're coming to take me away? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnzHtm1jhL4&feature=kp )
Pico and Sepulveda. La Brea Tar Pits.
Boot to the head?
 
2014-03-20 01:07:52 AM
 
2014-03-20 01:15:03 AM
I let myself down gently, lever up the footrest, spoon up beside him. His shoulder pushes up a wave of his mother's blanket, and that is where I rest my head. He grunts, pets my leg. I think of the belugas' dissonant chatter as they follow the Moskva home, clots of sound overscored by the strings and winds of the orchestra. I think of the trills of their kin on the Voyager traversing the profound silence beyond the star that gave them life. How strange to the beings of those longicuous worlds the glissandos of the humpback whales.

I'm not particularly surprised that an essay about dementia written by a Ph.D. in English who was a gender studies professor ends on this paragraph.
 
2014-03-20 01:17:21 AM
That's a really long article. I'll read it later.
 
2014-03-20 01:25:57 AM
I"m not very thrilled with it at but I can already see the starts of it. I'm starting to leave words out of sentences when I both write and speak them. Words and names I should know.....just aren't there anymore. I can trick myself into thinking of them most of the time but how long will that last?

bad head injury

wear your seatbelts, kids
 
2014-03-20 01:28:23 AM
I don't have to read an article, I see it in my step-dad whenever I visit my mother's place. Not sure what is more depressing, seeing him slowly slip away or that his family rarely talks to him.
 
2014-03-20 01:30:12 AM

HotWingAgenda: I let myself down gently, lever up the footrest, spoon up beside him. His shoulder pushes up a wave of his mother's blanket, and that is where I rest my head. He grunts, pets my leg. I think of the belugas' dissonant chatter as they follow the Moskva home, clots of sound overscored by the strings and winds of the orchestra. I think of the trills of their kin on the Voyager traversing the profound silence beyond the star that gave them life. How strange to the beings of those longicuous worlds the glissandos of the humpback whales.

I'm not particularly surprised that an essay about dementia written by a Ph.D. in English who was a gender studies professor ends on this paragraph.


I read the whole thing--and it's all like that.

Oh...I'm not really a writer.
You have dementia.
Oh...I'm now a writer.

Clever, I guess.
 
2014-03-20 01:31:45 AM
Fighting the onset of Alzheimers myself. Grandfather, father and brother all have/had it. I found this article to be terrifying.

.....and far too long.
 
2014-03-20 01:37:16 AM
That was interesting and hard to read. Both of my mom's parents had dementia. They played at least as large a role in raising me as my parents did. Their illness tore my family apart. But I made a kind of peace with it. It hurt so much when they no longer remembered me, and I became Wayne, or Kenny, or Ralph. But I I grew to not care as long as they were happy to see me. They loved KFC, and I'd take it to them 2 or 3 times a week. "I've never had this before. Oh! It's so good!" They couldn't remember 5 minutes ago, but they could remember the 1940s like it was yesterday. And in a way it was easier when they were no longer in the present, because to them they were young and virile and full of life and the future was open and they were together and happy. Dementia is a ruthless and nasty bastard worthy of hate and scorn. But sometimes it's possible to step back from your own loss and enjoy the gift your loved one's happiness with them as they relive better times.
 
2014-03-20 01:44:16 AM
Thankfully no one in my family has had that or Alzheimer's, but still a raw as hell one to read, though oddly inspiring. It had to have been hard as farking hell to have sat and wrote that knowing what lied in store, but at least she gave some documentation that can perhaps help research on it. :-(
 
2014-03-20 01:48:39 AM

RoyBatty: Harry_Seldon: [keithroysdon.files.wordpress.com image 500x287]

//too obscure for Fark.

They're coming to take me away? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnzHtm1jhL4&feature=kp )
Pico and Sepulveda. La Brea Tar Pits.
Boot to the head?


Considering we just had a Fish Heads headline a week or so ago, I don't think it's that obscure.


This stuff scares the shiat out of me. Two of my uncles died of Alzheimers and my grandmother on the same side died of microvascular dementia. I hope they find a cure in the next ten years or so.
 
2014-03-20 01:50:09 AM

johnson442: Been done.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 325x325]


johnson442: Been done.

[upload.wikimedia.org image 325x325]


img.fark.net
 
2014-03-20 02:02:53 AM
If you want to see a truly horrific descent into dementia, look up the artwork of one Louis Wain. He was famous in Edwardian times for painting cute paintings of cats (the original "LOLCats").

s2.hubimg.com

Then, his brain started to malfunction, and his cat portraits started to get strange.
s1.hubimg.com

And weirder.........
 www.cerebromente.org.br


Until within a  few years, he was totally batso and his cat portraits were pure Nightmare Fuel.
i107.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-20 02:13:09 AM

TheXerox: I don't have to read an article, I see it in my step-dad whenever I visit my mother's place. Not sure what is more depressing, seeing him slowly slip away or that his family rarely talks to him.


Indeed.


I am The Xerox's biological father.  His step-father is married to my ex.


Mike, my ex's husband has always been a great guy.  He has been good to my ex and to my kids and grandkids.  He has always been a kind, gentle soul and reliable as the day is long.  Well, at least until a few years ago.  That was when he started slipping.  Our first real indication was four years ago when he ran my then ten year old granddaughter to school.  She went to an innovative school downtown, so you had to walk her into the school, as opposed to just dropping her off in front of it.  Sometimes, this meant parking a few blocks away and then walking her there and then yourself back to your car.  Mike did that and then got lost.  Mid January in Des Moines, cold and windy beyond belief and having no idea where you left the car.  Fortunately, he had a cell phone and called my ex and she called me, asking that I go downtown, find him and help him.


I did.  We marched all over three blocks on all sides of the school in weather cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey for an hour before we found the car, by process of elimination on my part.  That convinced my ex to get him in to a doctor.  The diagnosis came back as frontal-temporal dementia.  Mike had to retire from work, go on Social Security disability and slowly get worse.  He is now in adult day care, five days a week while my ex works.  Some times, she has to work late, so I go pick him up.  I don't mind.  He's family.  You do that for family.  It just breaks my heart to see him slip away as the months go by, as he's only 56.  It has got to be so much worse for my ex to see that.
 
2014-03-20 02:14:35 AM
Hmm, dementia or ass cancer, dementia or ass cancer...

The good news is that my family are mostly obligate carnivores that drink all day and there's not much heart disease. However, demented ass cancer is likely.
 
2014-03-20 02:20:26 AM

Aulus: I don't mind.  He's family.


You get two Good Human award points. Maybe three.
 
2014-03-20 02:23:39 AM
Day 1:  Dear Diary, I found this new website called fark.com.  It's grreat!
Day 10:  Oh man, this site is the best.  LOLcats every Saturday morning!
Day 30:  Dear Diary:  gorgor's photoshop contest entry made me piss myself at work, got sent home.
day 60:  Oh man, for just five bucks I can get even MOAR fark!  Kittenz r dyin!
day 90 i hthinkninetyk I think...OK frkkin obamacare thread and drinking contest I went through a bottle of jack in like half an hour
day 91 i iwll never mix jack and percoset and gold spray paint ever again.   I think i got fired
day `180.  I don';t think that ohotphark was a good ide annow but I am getting some LOL
day 180, supplemental - got kicked out of my apartment becase I haven't paid the rent in like half a year.  I think mom will let me move back in with her,.
day 190 mom won't let me in the house because hygine, so I'm crashin' downstairs for now.
day 400 effin dark down here.  nobody outside is as smrt as me.  s.m.r.t
day 500 oh man I keep posting first, fack checking 2nd.  oh well who will ever know?  haha i trolld u!
day 670.  i thot my fon got rurn ed off but it just hasn rang in a year
day 1024 mom lowers my food ini a 5 gallon buckit ...
day 3038 ...kill.....me....
 
2014-03-20 02:36:09 AM

studebaker hoch: Day 1:  Dear Diary, I found this new website called fark.com.  It's grreat!
Day 10:  Oh man, this site is the best.  LOLcats every Saturday morning!
Day 30:  Dear Diary:  gorgor's photoshop contest entry made me piss myself at work, got sent home.
day 60:  Oh man, for just five bucks I can get even MOAR fark!  Kittenz r dyin!
day 90 i hthinkninetyk I think...OK frkkin obamacare thread and drinking contest I went through a bottle of jack in like half an hour
day 91 i iwll never mix jack and percoset and gold spray paint ever again.   I think i got fired
day `180.  I don';t think that ohotphark was a good ide annow but I am getting some LOL
day 180, supplemental - got kicked out of my apartment becase I haven't paid the rent in like half a year.  I think mom will let me move back in with her,.
day 190 mom won't let me in the house because hygine, so I'm crashin' downstairs for now.
day 400 effin dark down here.  nobody outside is as smrt as me.  s.m.r.t
day 500 oh man I keep posting first, fack checking 2nd.  oh well who will ever know?  haha i trolld u!
day 670.  i thot my fon got rurn ed off but it just hasn rang in a year
day 1024 mom lowers my food ini a 5 gallon buckit ...
day 3038 ...kill.....me....

3072, not 3038.
 
2014-03-20 02:56:50 AM
I wonder which one medical researchers find to be more fascinating from a purely scientific point of view: the insidious, relentless nature of cancer or the insidious, relentless nature of dementia.

You know, if humanity could lick those two (and I have confidence that in a future century, it'll be done), we could probably live happy and hardy to 120 years old.
 
2014-03-20 02:57:33 AM
That was... sad. I already have a plan in place in case I start going demented- find a bear, and try to kill it with a spear. My epitaph will read "Died (date), locked in mortal combat with a bear." My wife has already agreed to it.
 
2014-03-20 03:02:36 AM
Kept thinking about the role of technology will play the future of dementia while reading that- even some of the stuff becoming available now would be incredible useful, though I don't see it becoming adopted until a generation completely used to tech gets old enough to become demented. Will probably become a major area of economic activity too, more people living longer means more people hitting various limitations of being a meatbag that is not built to last.

I can see a Google glass-type setup to take in basic contextual information in hand with a regimented programmed schedule to keep people with dementia as functional and independent as long as possible. Like regular reminders and inquiries on what a person is doing at a given place and time with flags to intervene (and contact others if appropriate) based on what it is seeing/where it is positioned to help prevent repeated/potentially dangerous behavior (early on, my Grandfather with Alzheimers would shower and make breakfast several times daily). Hell, with enough data collected for a given subject, I bet a program could predict with decent accuracy the appropriate time that a person should use a bathroom following a meal/snack (especially if the time of consumption was scheduled). That alone would do wonders in helping with the incredibly depressing loss of dignity. Would be even a fantastic time-waster, getting people to make their own videos and reminders trying to help their future selves with whatever they can currently offer gives them a project to work on. It does sound like a better system then what my grandfather went through on his own with sticky notes and a notebook, though then again there is that precipice mentioned in the article where the longer the mind fights, the worse the inevitable surrender will be (which was definitely true in his case).
 
2014-03-20 03:09:17 AM
Couldn't get past the condescending first paragraph. Hopefully her Dementia made her writing less superfluous as her illness progressed.
 
2014-03-20 03:13:15 AM

Aulus: TheXerox: I don't have to read an article, I see it in my step-dad whenever I visit my mother's place. Not sure what is more depressing, seeing him slowly slip away or that his family rarely talks to him.

Indeed.


I am The Xerox's biological father.  His step-father is married to my ex.


Mike, my ex's husband has always been a great guy.  He has been good to my ex and to my kids and grandkids.  He has always been a kind, gentle soul and reliable as the day is long.  Well, at least until a few years ago.  That was when he started slipping.  Our first real indication was four years ago when he ran my then ten year old granddaughter to school.  She went to an innovative school downtown, so you had to walk her into the school, as opposed to just dropping her off in front of it.  Sometimes, this meant parking a few blocks away and then walking her there and then yourself back to your car.  Mike did that and then got lost.  Mid January in Des Moines, cold and windy beyond belief and having no idea where you left the car.  Fortunately, he had a cell phone and called my ex and she called me, asking that I go downtown, find him and help him.


I did.  We marched all over three blocks on all sides of the school in weather cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey for an hour before we found the car, by process of elimination on my part.  That convinced my ex to get him in to a doctor.  The diagnosis came back as frontal-temporal dementia.  Mike had to retire from work, go on Social Security disability and slowly get worse.  He is now in adult day care, five days a week while my ex works.  Some times, she has to work late, so I go pick him up.  I don't mind.  He's family.  You do that for family.  It just breaks my heart to see him slip away as the months go by, as he's only 56.  It has got to be so much worse for my ex to see that.


You are awesome. If you're ever in Chicago pizza and whatever beverage you care for, on me. And I mean that.
 
2014-03-20 03:15:08 AM

studebaker hoch: Day 1:  Dear Diary, I found this new website called fark.com.  It's grreat!
Day 10:  Oh man, this site is the best.  LOLcats every Saturday morning!
Day 30:  Dear Diary:  gorgor's photoshop contest entry made me piss myself at work, got sent home.
day 60:  Oh man, for just five bucks I can get even MOAR fark!  Kittenz r dyin!
day 90 i hthinkninetyk I think...OK frkkin obamacare thread and drinking contest I went through a bottle of jack in like half an hour
day 91 i iwll never mix jack and percoset and gold spray paint ever again.   I think i got fired
day `180.  I don';t think that ohotphark was a good ide annow but I am getting some LOL
day 180, supplemental - got kicked out of my apartment becase I haven't paid the rent in like half a year.  I think mom will let me move back in with her,.
day 190 mom won't let me in the house because hygine, so I'm crashin' downstairs for now.
day 400 effin dark down here.  nobody outside is as smrt as me.  s.m.r.t
day 500 oh man I keep posting first, fack checking 2nd.  oh well who will ever know?  haha i trolld u!
day 670.  i thot my fon got rurn ed off but it just hasn rang in a year
day 1024 mom lowers my food ini a 5 gallon buckit ...
day 3038 ...kill.....me....


That's just farkin awesome.
What's it about?
 
2014-03-20 03:40:09 AM

Harry_Seldon: [keithroysdon.files.wordpress.com image 500x287]

//too obscure for Fark.


They're going to take me away, ha ha!
 
2014-03-20 03:43:13 AM

Aulus: TheXerox: I don't have to read an article, I see it in my step-dad whenever I visit my mother's place. Not sure what is more depressing, seeing him slowly slip away or that his family rarely talks to him.

Indeed.


I am The Xerox's biological father.  His step-father is married to my ex.


Mike, my ex's husband has always been a great guy.  He has been good to my ex and to my kids and grandkids.  He has always been a kind, gentle soul and reliable as the day is long.  Well, at least until a few years ago.  That was when he started slipping.  Our first real indication was four years ago when he ran my then ten year old granddaughter to school.  She went to an innovative school downtown, so you had to walk her into the school, as opposed to just dropping her off in front of it.  Sometimes, this meant parking a few blocks away and then walking her there and then yourself back to your car.  Mike did that and then got lost.  Mid January in Des Moines, cold and windy beyond belief and having no idea where you left the car.  Fortunately, he had a cell phone and called my ex and she called me, asking that I go downtown, find him and help him.


I did.  We marched all over three blocks on all sides of the school in weather cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey for an hour before we found the car, by process of elimination on my part.  That convinced my ex to get him in to a doctor.  The diagnosis came back as frontal-temporal dementia.  Mike had to retire from work, go on Social Security disability and slowly get worse.  He is now in adult day care, five days a week while my ex works.  Some times, she has to work late, so I go pick him up.  I don't mind.  He's family.  You do that for family.  It just breaks my heart to see him slip away as the months go by, as he's only 56.  It has got to be so much worse for my ex to see that.


We are going through this with my grandmother right now, she's into her 80s.

She can still speak perfectly well, and is mostly capable of managing her daily hygiene, but she can't hold on to anything long enough to have a conversation and gets stuck in loops a lot. When she's not looping she ends up just not talking and sitting there. She was always about her reading and puzzle books but she can't process them anymore, so I think she's bored to tears on top of everything else.

The ones that hurt are when she asks where grandpa is. But thank FSM when you tell her he's gone, it flips the switch in her brain that tells her she already knew that.

Right now she's manageable within the family. Mom is her anchor, and she remembers who everyone on our side is, as well as my uncle. His wife and their kids are a toss up, but the cousins came a good 20 years after my brother and I. She has to be nagged about her pills, and watched because she'll pocket them; and occasionally tricked into eating.

It's hard on my parents, so she's got a standing welcome at our house for when they need a break. Though we kinda decided after her last stay that it would be better for me to just go stay with her at their house while they go off on a trip or something. She gets worse and more loop prone if we change her environment, so when she comes to stay with us she usually ends up going back right around the time she starts settles in.
 
2014-03-20 03:43:38 AM
Tl;d...d...what?
 
2014-03-20 03:50:51 AM
My 89 yo grandmother currently has dementia, but it hasn't been officially diagnosed. Her general practitioner just says it like it's an everyday thing, which is probably for the better since you can't really do anything about it. My mother, who has power of attorney, is in denial about the whole thing and is the singularly most hateful person ever to my grandmother. When my husband and I get up and farking leave a family dinner because my mother starts yelling at my grandmother at the dinner table over what asparagus is, you know you're an awful human being.

Reading that whole article is very familiar and the one phrase I identified with most was "second childhood", as it is exactly like dealing with a child. She wants the attention, she pouts, she forgets, she lies, she does bad things, she steals stuff, she finds humor in not funny situations, she doesn't dress herself properly, or brush her hair, etc. It is THE most frustrating thing to deal with.

Every Friday is "Grandma Day". I take a day off work to take her out to do her grocery shopping, errands, house chores. yard work, and then lunch. Increasingly I have noticed she can't remember jack shiat, even the simplest of things that she talked about 5 minutes prior. She goes to the bank and will put the paper bank envelopes in her purse with the money still in them. When we get to Walmart she'll sort through 50+ paper envelopes looking for her money, she flat out refuses to keep it in her wallet. Same for her Discover card, it's stuffed in a little side pocket of her purse. That's her third Discover card she's on now, because she's lost the prior two.

She lies, inadvertently or not. It was recently my mother's birthday and my grandmother called her other daughter who lives 3 hours away to remind her that my mom's birthday was on such and such a day and that she needs to send out a card in time, oh and that we're going out to dinner at a local place that my aunt should come. She told mom when she talked to her later that my aunt called her, not the other way around. When my aunt shows up a few days later she said to my mom, "Oh I'm so glad mom called me". My aunt and my mom do not get along and it's been years since they've talked, so you can imagine the awkwardness at dinner.

Every Friday when we go out to restaurants for lunch, I have to remind her to use her utensils and not her fingers. She was elbow deep in french salad dressing because she was using her fingers to eat salad. I give her the stern mother look while I am telling her this, then she looks at me and grins the biggest shiat-eating grin and eats that piece of lettuce in her fingers and just dares me to do anything about it.

She insists that there is something wrong with X body part or X symptom. She's recently had a knee replaced and with it came some blood clots in her lungs, she insists the coumadin is making her skin bad, like dry flaky hands and mottled facial complexion. She's always had amazing skin and still does, but it's all in her head that she's convinced the coumadin is bad. Her doctor at the hospital where she was taken for the blood clots said she'd be on it for a year, since she had 6+ clots. It hasn't been 6 months and she's demanding her doctor take her off of it. Finally he relents, I think either to just shut her up or hope the clots kill her and he won't have to deal with her anymore. Within 12 hours she's calling me in a panic saying she's short of breath and that the clots are back and she needs to be on the coumadin. She's been to every doctor in a 50 mile radius for a variety of complaints. She goes to 3 different pharmacies. Little wonder she ended up in the ER last spring for a drug interaction that nearly killed her. That week in the hospital she spent getting off all of the medication and getting back on the needed medication properly was the most lucid I have seen her in years. If only it had lasted. She cogent enough so that you can't do anything with her without her permission.

She has "nerves". No one knows what this means and she cannot describe it to you. The best I can guess is some sort of anxiety disorder. "My nerves are shot today, I'm having a bad day, I'm a nervous wreck, What do you take for nerves?". She's been on every conceivable anti-anxiety med, which never works, because after two days she'll declare they don't work and stop taking them. Or she'll say, "They make my face feel like they've got needles in them." and stop taking them consistently.

A month ago, she called me 8x before 6am in a panic state. What was the panic all about? She didn't set her trash out for pick-up day, and they came and left, and now there are  two bags of trash in her garage. It took me six phone calls just to figure out what the fark the emergency was since she wouldn't tell me and kept hanging up. Then two more calls crying about the trash in her garage. Meanwhile I'm just sitting there in bed with this "WTF just happened?" look plastered on my face. Who gets worried about farking trash?! What's the big deal, I'll pick them up tomorrow when I pick her up, I'll drop them off at the county thing.

And I think the scariest thing ever is that she also suffers from advanced macular degeneration, i.e. she's blind as a goddamn bat, yet, YET, she insists on driving herself around town. She can't see the TV without practically sitting on top of it, she can't read a big letter book without a magnifying glass and a search light, she can't see someone in a room without every search light she owns turned on at noon, she can't see what a particular food is in a bowl on a table in front of her, but she insists she can see well enough to drive. Not to mention she got lost trying to find the post office, which hasn't moved in 60 years.

Me: "Why does your car have a new dent in it?"
Her: "Some guy hit me while I was parked at the beauty shop." (dent is on the rear right passenger door, beauty shop has parallel parking on the street)
Me: "You drove yourself to the beauty shop?"
Her: "As long as the sun is bright enough and I can see those two lines to stay between them, I can see good enough to drive."
Me: "What if there's a kid with a ball in between those two lines?"
Her: "Well he shouldn't be in the street anyway."

I want the head of the person at the license branch that gave her a new license this past January...they didn't even make her take an eye exam.

Annoyingly, she's gotten increasingly more political and racist. She now watches Fox News 24/7 and sadly believes every single word they say. Like late last fall Obama was making us all become Muslims, so she freaked out when I showed up on a chilly, windy afternoon wearing a pashmina headscarf to keep the wind out of my ears and keep my hair in place. She won't eat at a particular restaurant if "jungle bunnies" cook the food. She won't eat at Ihop anymore because Muslims own it (fine by me, they have shiat food anyway). She won't eat at the Mexican restaurant she used to like because Mexicans are dirty, filty illegals. She won't go to Indian doctors because they're "not American". You cannot have a normal conversation with her without it turning into a polticial or racist debate.

Every Friday night when I get home to my quiet, calm house in the woods I stare up at the sky and scream to the stars, then tell my husband that if I ever get like that, to please shoot me.
 
2014-03-20 04:28:41 AM

yellowjester: Couldn't get past the condescending first paragraph. Hopefully her Dementia made her writing less superfluous as her illness progressed.


One can only hope.  I read a bit, then spot checked it in a few other places.  The entire thing reeks of pretentious twunt syndrome.
 
2014-03-20 05:40:32 AM
Flowers for Algernon.
 
2014-03-20 06:00:13 AM

Molavian: yellowjester: Couldn't get past the condescending first paragraph. Hopefully her Dementia made her writing less superfluous as her illness progressed.

One can only hope.  I read a bit, then spot checked it in a few other places.  The entire thing reeks of pretentious twunt syndrome.


Why don't the two of you just buy a dictionary? There's no shame in using one.
 
2014-03-20 07:30:26 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: What I found amazing was that no matter how much I scrolled, the scrollbar indicator only ever moved the tiniest little bit.


I noticed that too, and I started feeling the growing onset of dementia the more I read, so I stopped reading it, and I'm doing fine now.

\thinks she used ALL the words
\\had to scrounge these words together from the trash bin
\\\none more left
 
2014-03-20 07:53:57 AM
truly something i fear. it's just heartbreaking on so many levels.

/dear science, fix this and i'll tickle your nuts with my (your choice)
 
2014-03-20 07:55:38 AM
My mom's mother had Dementia when she died. One of her sisters is dealing with it now.

It sucks
 
2014-03-20 08:12:02 AM

schmidtybone: That was... sad. I already have a plan in place in case I start going demented- find a bear, and try to kill it with a spear. My epitaph will read "Died (date), locked in mortal combat with a bear." My wife has already agreed to it.


Problem with dementia is, your "bear" may be the mailman...

/yes, I have a plan to dispose of my guns properly when it's my turn in the chute
 
2014-03-20 08:26:07 AM

blinkybluegnome: Fighting the onset of Alzheimers myself. Grandfather, father and brother all have/had it. I found this article to be terrifying.

.....and far too long.


Worries me too since my grandfather on my mom's side developed Alzheimer's and diabetes later in life. He was also notorious for not taking care of himself until he couldn't remember to do so anyway. So I take pretty good care of my diet and I swim regularly aiming to stave off diabetes; hopefully this will either slow or prevent Alzheimer's.

I've read articles about how Alzheimer's may be considered a 'type 3 diabetes' because of some of the common roles of insulin sensitivity and other factors. That's the best plan I can come up with for myself anyways, short of crossing my fingers.

/would be too hard to type with crossed fingers anyways
 
2014-03-20 08:26:12 AM

Cerebral Ballsy: Molavian: yellowjester: Couldn't get past the condescending first paragraph. Hopefully her Dementia made her writing less superfluous as her illness progressed.

One can only hope.  I read a bit, then spot checked it in a few other places.  The entire thing reeks of pretentious twunt syndrome.

Why don't the two of you just buy a dictionary? There's no shame in using one.


This.
 
2014-03-20 08:30:54 AM
Plees put flowers on Algernons grave.
 
2014-03-20 09:15:12 AM
Seriously folks, take this advice to heart....both my parents had dementia before they died.

TALK TO YOUR PARENTS NOW.  CONVINCE THEM TO GET ALL THEIR AFFAIRS IN ORDER BEFORE IT'S TOO LATE.  DEMENTIA CAN DEVELOP QUICKLY, AND THEY MAY NOT BE MENTALLY COMPETENT TO RECALL ALL THEIR ASSETS, BANK ACCOUNTS, ETC.

This happened to my parents.  They came down with dementia before splitting everything up, and believe me it was a mess.  We're still not sure we accounted for everything.
 
2014-03-20 09:51:38 AM

TV's Vinnie: If you want to see a truly horrific descent into dementia, look up the artwork of one Louis Wain. He was famous in Edwardian times for painting cute paintings of cats (the original "LOLCats").

[s2.hubimg.com image 520x771]

Then, his brain started to malfunction, and his cat portraits started to get strange.
[s1.hubimg.com image 520x685]

And weirder.........
 [www.cerebromente.org.br image 187x227]


Until within a  few years, he was totally batso and his cat portraits were pure Nightmare Fuel.
[i107.photobucket.com image 548x681]



IIRC, that wasn't dementia.  It was schizophrenia.
 
2014-03-20 10:01:30 AM
Both grandmothers had dementia.  I have no doubt that if my Mom's mother knew what she would be like at the end, she would have found a way out while she was still somewhat in control.

/Both lived to mid-90's.  My father's mother had 3 siblings (one a twin brother) who also made mid-90s, and all had dementia as well.
 
2014-03-20 10:15:26 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: What I found amazing was that no matter how much I scrolled, the scrollbar indicator only ever moved the tiniest little bit.


No kidding. It's well written so I've given it about 25 minutes and there's no end in sight. Give some warning if it's an F'ing Tolstoy novel. Jeebus.
 
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