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(UPI)   Scrap dealer buys golden egg for $13,000 intending to sell it for scrap. meh: He couldn't find a buyer and holds onto it. Fark: googles the name "Vacheron Constantin" that was in it. Ultrafark: It's one of the missing Faberge eggs   (upi.com) divider line 114
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14772 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Mar 2014 at 10:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-19 11:23:16 PM  

ongbok: NickelP: that article makes no sense. he bought it to melt it down but held onto it for a decade? if he was going to melt it why did he need a buyer? that entire thing was just illogical bullshiat.

No what doesn't make sense is that an antiques dealer didn't know that they had the holy grail of antiques and sold it for 13000.


Probably wasn't an antiques dealer so much as a guy who was asked to come in and manage the estate sale. There's a reason collectors hit those things every weekend- families are often just trying to clear Great Uncle Mike's stuff out of the house so they can sell it and be done with the affair, and a lot of rare and expensive stuff gets put out with $10 price tags. Valuable paintings get found at those things all the time, and small knick-nacks where the value isn't immediately obvious get sold for nothing all the time. The people trying to sell the stuff off are often the kids of the owner- they're not antiquities experts, and it often doesn't cross their minds to do serious research.
 
2014-03-19 11:26:40 PM  

Radak: Unbelievable that someone would a) consider melting that down


He wanted to melt it down before the rightful owners could claim it.  Oh, wait!  That's Gold & Silver Pawn in Vegas, buying stolen coins!
 
2014-03-19 11:29:36 PM  
Those eggs are tacky and ostentatious like a lot of Russian crap. Unlike these Obama collectible plates (which I was banking on to make me a hefty return) the egg will at least yield something useful.
 
2014-03-19 11:29:50 PM  

ongbok: what doesn't make sense is that an antiques dealer didn't know that they had the holy grail of antiques and sold it for 13000.


Considering he claims to have bought it a decade ago, there were plenty of search engines available in 2003/4 to perform a search on "egg" and the name inside.  I'm calling shenanigans on this one.
 
2014-03-19 11:33:29 PM  

Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.


It is just you. You're looking at that one pretty thing. If this guy was buying this kind of thing, then he was also buying piles of other shiny stuff, so he's used to glittery semiprecious jewels and costume jewelry on gold fittings.
 
2014-03-19 11:33:38 PM  

Radak: I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it,


It's gold. Most jewelry is really, really pretty.

But you pop those gems out, melt down the metal, and you can make something even prettier. I look at that egg, I see a home for a nice piece of alexandrite on a pendant and a chain to hang it on.
 
2014-03-19 11:34:05 PM  

farkingismybusiness: Who cares about the egg. I want to goose that laid it.


I want the geeses
 
2014-03-19 11:35:39 PM  

WelldeadLink: Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.

It is just you. You're looking at that one pretty thing. If this guy was buying this kind of thing, then he was also buying piles of other shiny stuff, so he's used to glittery semiprecious jewels and costume jewelry on gold fittings.


I will say, having seen the Fabergé portion of the wonders of the tsars exhibit, everything was so encrusted with gems they look like phony costume jewelry.
 
2014-03-19 11:37:04 PM  

Fano: farkingismybusiness: Who cares about the egg. I want to goose that laid it.

I want the geeses


The foundry WaWa might have been able to melt that down for you.
 
2014-03-19 11:37:36 PM  

cptjeff: ongbok: NickelP: that article makes no sense. he bought it to melt it down but held onto it for a decade? if he was going to melt it why did he need a buyer? that entire thing was just illogical bullshiat.

No what doesn't make sense is that an antiques dealer didn't know that they had the holy grail of antiques and sold it for 13000.

Probably wasn't an antiques dealer so much as a guy who was asked to come in and manage the estate sale. There's a reason collectors hit those things every weekend- families are often just trying to clear Great Uncle Mike's stuff out of the house so they can sell it and be done with the affair, and a lot of rare and expensive stuff gets put out with $10 price tags. Valuable paintings get found at those things all the time, and small knick-nacks where the value isn't immediately obvious get sold for nothing all the time. The people trying to sell the stuff off are often the kids of the owner- they're not antiquities experts, and it often doesn't cross their minds to do serious research.


a buddy of mine actually liquidates estates for a living. some random bullshiat may slip by, but they work on a commission basis and take a percent of sales. there is 0 chance an antique gold egg like that with a well known watch makers piece on it just gets floated out without anyone looking into it. on the off chance it does, the liquidator would but it at spot himself. like another poster said, if this thing sold in a collection of stuff for $20 it would be more plausable. everyone involved sounds like they were into this for 10k plus.
 
2014-03-19 11:40:43 PM  

Fano: WelldeadLink: Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.

It is just you. You're looking at that one pretty thing. If this guy was buying this kind of thing, then he was also buying piles of other shiny stuff, so he's used to glittery semiprecious jewels and costume jewelry on gold fittings.

I will say, having seen the Fabergé portion of the wonders of the tsars exhibit, everything was so encrusted with gems they look like phony costume jewelry.


Royals have horrible taste.

When they finally killed the czar and his family in the basement of the palace, there were so many large gems on the women's gowns that some of the bullets ricocheted off of them.

Then of course the bodies went on this crazy scavenger hunt all over Russia, with Anastasia finally winding up under some planks, where scientists and historians finally found her, then they gave a lecture on how, which is where I learned about the bullet ricocheting story.
 
2014-03-19 11:41:00 PM  
The article says he "held onto it for decades" but then saw a picture of this dealer and the egg from a current interview.
Huh???
This is either complete bullshiat or a terribly written article.  Or both.
 
2014-03-19 11:42:33 PM  

Oldiron_79: rebelyell2006: Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.

Were you around for the threads about the people who discovered gold coins stolen from the mint 100 years ago? Farkers were suggesting melting them down for the raw gold in order to hide any connections to a crime. Never underestimate the destructive power of ignorance and greed.

Id rather melt down (insert most precious art item made of gold) than let the government take it from me at bayonet point and me get nothing for it.


So, you'd destroy history in the name of making a quick buck? Screw our past, screw our future, give me ill-gained money now?
 
2014-03-19 11:44:58 PM  

Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.


It also went through an auction house in the 60s without anyone realizing what it was.  So I wouldn't blame a scrap dealer for not recognizing it or thinking it was something special.
 
2014-03-19 11:46:34 PM  

fusillade762: [www.top10films.co.uk image 580x323]


I see this has been covered, bravo
 
2014-03-19 11:47:35 PM  
Conflict eggs!
 
2014-03-19 11:49:29 PM  

KarmicDisaster: MNguy: KarmicDisaster: .  Assuming that thing weighs more than 2 pounds,

Assuming you're maybe functionally retarded

Well, it depends on the size. Here they site another one of the eggs as being 3x5 inches.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gatchina_Palace_%28Faberg%C3%A9_egg%29
so they are lot bigger than a regular egg. Don't know about this new one. Gold is heavy, 19.3 g/cubic cm
Assuming a sphere with diameter of 4 inches, the volume would be about 523 cubic cm. That would weigh 10 Kg, or about 22 pounds if solid Gold. Obviously the egg isn't anywhere near solid solid, but with the base shown there could certainly be at least 2 pounds of Gold in it, which at the time was worth $12800.


That's all assuming the salvage buyer just took it on faith that the item was pure gold... which I can't imagine ever happens even in the bizarro world that guy is living in where he drops 13 large on a trinket, then puts it next to the dinnerware.

A series of core assays would be somewhat detrimental to the value of the item if he knew it had some artistic and historical value, but would definitely be done so he didn't buy a 18k plated rock for the trading price of .999% pure.

The whole story smells like shiat. There's more to it and someone is lying.
 
2014-03-19 11:55:29 PM  

NickelP: cptjeff: ongbok: NickelP: that article makes no sense. he bought it to melt it down but held onto it for a decade? if he was going to melt it why did he need a buyer? that entire thing was just illogical bullshiat.

No what doesn't make sense is that an antiques dealer didn't know that they had the holy grail of antiques and sold it for 13000.

Probably wasn't an antiques dealer so much as a guy who was asked to come in and manage the estate sale. There's a reason collectors hit those things every weekend- families are often just trying to clear Great Uncle Mike's stuff out of the house so they can sell it and be done with the affair, and a lot of rare and expensive stuff gets put out with $10 price tags. Valuable paintings get found at those things all the time, and small knick-nacks where the value isn't immediately obvious get sold for nothing all the time. The people trying to sell the stuff off are often the kids of the owner- they're not antiquities experts, and it often doesn't cross their minds to do serious research.

a buddy of mine actually liquidates estates for a living. some random bullshiat may slip by, but they work on a commission basis and take a percent of sales. there is 0 chance an antique gold egg like that with a well known watch makers piece on it just gets floated out without anyone looking into it. on the off chance it does, the liquidator would but it at spot himself. like another poster said, if this thing sold in a collection of stuff for $20 it would be more plausable. everyone involved sounds like they were into this for 10k plus.


Not everyone hires a pro, and even if they did, how deep do you think the expertise on Fabrage eggs goes when you're in the deep south? Face it, there ain't a lot of money in that part of the world, and it's not something you generally dig up. The owners got $13,000 out of it, which sure as hell ain't nothing. They knew it had some value, just not how much. The people cleaning out the estate probably called the metal dealer saying, 'hey, we got an old gold bauble, wanna come buy it off of us?' Guy drives over, sees gold thing- is used to seeing a lot of gold jewelry that looks pretty but isn't actually worth anything, makes an estimate, buys it. Is stupid and doesn't look it up.

I find it's always safer to assume stupidity than it is to assume a conspiracy. People, as a rule, are idiots. Most everyone involved was probably way out of their depth, and the idea that it was one of the most sought after pieces of jewelry in human history probably didn't even cross their minds. And I'm not sure I blame them- it was in a damn inconspicuous place.
 
2014-03-19 11:56:05 PM  

rebelyell2006: So, you'd destroy history in the name of making a quick buck?


Not every gaudy piece of jewelry is in fact worth much more than it's components.

Take Tiffany rings. A thin silver ring from Tiffany's with a sapphire so small you need a loupe to see its color properly goes for more than 100 dollars. Anyone who make jewelry can whip up the same damn thing for you, $30 including parts and labor.

I saw a jeweler once who had a model chair in gold and silver studded with emeralds, rubies, and sapphires. Selling price? $1500. (it wasn't that big) Basically at cost and a bit. Why? No one knew his name. If Tiffany released the same chair, it would have been sold for $10,000 at least.

This egg is gauche, but it's a lot of gold and some gems. $13000 seems right for a scrap dealer to pay. On the other hand, because some famous guy made it, it's actually worth MILLIONS. But that's just dumb luck. If you can prove Emma Watson waved it around a bit and said "Forgeticus" with it in her hand, you can sell a stick of firewood for a good bit of money. Doesn't make the wood special.
 
2014-03-19 11:56:26 PM  

Radak: b) let it sit around on the kitchen counter for years like a knickknack.


That's exactly what it is, a knickknack for the obscenely rich.  What else would a Fabrege egg be?

MBooda: It's the Russian's hand, no doubt about it.
[2.bp.blogspot.com image 487x369]


I like how Wilmer is 'Oh yes I see and I'll just sidle along...YOINK!'
 
2014-03-20 12:00:46 AM  
i.imgur.com

Disappointed, one and all.
 
2014-03-20 12:02:09 AM  

cptjeff: ongbok: NickelP: that article makes no sense. he bought it to melt it down but held onto it for a decade? if he was going to melt it why did he need a buyer? that entire thing was just illogical bullshiat.

No what doesn't make sense is that an antiques dealer didn't know that they had the holy grail of antiques and sold it for 13000.

Probably wasn't an antiques dealer so much as a guy who was asked to come in and manage the estate sale. There's a reason collectors hit those things every weekend- families are often just trying to clear Great Uncle Mike's stuff out of the house so they can sell it and be done with the affair, and a lot of rare and expensive stuff gets put out with $10 price tags. Valuable paintings get found at those things all the time, and small knick-nacks where the value isn't immediately obvious get sold for nothing all the time. The people trying to sell the stuff off are often the kids of the owner- they're not antiquities experts, and it often doesn't cross their minds to do serious research.


I was thinking it wasn't an antiques dealer but more of a guy who has a shop with a sign that says antiques, that has old or old looking stuff that he has no clue what it is worth, but just prices it by the way it looks.
 
2014-03-20 12:03:21 AM  

blacksho89: robertus: taxandspend: proteus_b: Radak: I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first? I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide. It seems like something that would be worth looking into. Maybe it's just me.

First off, this! The thing is supposedly one of the great treasures of art and craft, and the guy wants to melt it down?

Secondly, he's all like "I'm just humble folks", but he purchases something for 13,000 dollars (which means he thinks it's worth more than that---otherwise he'd just hang on to his dollars) and then doesn't even investigate it? Or even if he is going to melt it down---doesn't do that either? Sorry, I don't know many "humble folks" that can just toss that kind of cash out the window.

But his world is a world of pick-up trucks and diners... and $13,000 golden eggs. You know, real blue-collar America.

[hulshofschmidt.files.wordpress.com image 620x412]

Since you HAD to make it political for no damn reason..
George Soros, of Progressive Insurance, makes 1.9 million...per hour. 126,000 times what he pays his CSRs (and his CSRs start at a pretty good wage for the skillset.) We REALLY need to do something about that old income inequality, don't we.


What's your point?
 
2014-03-20 12:05:07 AM  

ElLoco: A series of core assays


Who the hell does core assays on jewelry? Are you on Mars?
 
2014-03-20 12:06:39 AM  
content8.flixster.com
Some people would kill for a Franklin Mint.
 
2014-03-20 12:16:15 AM  

farkingismybusiness: [content8.flixster.com image 360x225]
Some people would kill for a Franklin Mint.


I farking love that movie.

Wear *stab* your seat belt *stab*.  It's the law!
 
2014-03-20 12:16:18 AM  

cptjeff: NickelP: cptjeff: ongbok: NickelP: that article makes no sense. he bought it to melt it down but held onto it for a decade? if he was going to melt it why did he need a buyer? that entire thing was just illogical bullshiat.

No what doesn't make sense is that an antiques dealer didn't know that they had the holy grail of antiques and sold it for 13000.

Probably wasn't an antiques dealer so much as a guy who was asked to come in and manage the estate sale. There's a reason collectors hit those things every weekend- families are often just trying to clear Great Uncle Mike's stuff out of the house so they can sell it and be done with the affair, and a lot of rare and expensive stuff gets put out with $10 price tags. Valuable paintings get found at those things all the time, and small knick-nacks where the value isn't immediately obvious get sold for nothing all the time. The people trying to sell the stuff off are often the kids of the owner- they're not antiquities experts, and it often doesn't cross their minds to do serious research.

a buddy of mine actually liquidates estates for a living. some random bullshiat may slip by, but they work on a commission basis and take a percent of sales. there is 0 chance an antique gold egg like that with a well known watch makers piece on it just gets floated out without anyone looking into it. on the off chance it does, the liquidator would but it at spot himself. like another poster said, if this thing sold in a collection of stuff for $20 it would be more plausable. everyone involved sounds like they were into this for 10k plus.

Not everyone hires a pro, and even if they did, how deep do you think the expertise on Fabrage eggs goes when you're in the deep south? Face it, there ain't a lot of money in that part of the world, and it's not something you generally dig up. The owners got $13,000 out of it, which sure as hell ain't nothing. They knew it had some value, just not how much. The people cleaning out the estate probably called the metal dealer saying, 'hey, we got an old gold bauble, wanna come buy it off of us?' Guy drives over, sees gold thing- is used to seeing a lot of gold jewelry that looks pretty but isn't actually worth anything, makes an estimate, buys it. Is stupid and doesn't look it up.

I find it's always safer to assume stupidity than it is to assume a conspiracy. People, as a rule, are idiots. Most everyone involved was probably way out of their depth, and the idea that it was one of the most sought after pieces of jewelry in human history probably didn't even cross their minds. And I'm not sure I blame them- it was in a damn inconspicuous place.


thats the part that doesn't make sense. if all those idiots are paying scrap price to scrap it why did none of them do so?
 
2014-03-20 12:17:22 AM  

doglover: rebelyell2006: So, you'd destroy history in the name of making a quick buck?

Not every gaudy piece of jewelry is in fact worth much more than it's components.

Take Tiffany rings. A thin silver ring from Tiffany's with a sapphire so small you need a loupe to see its color properly goes for more than 100 dollars. Anyone who make jewelry can whip up the same damn thing for you, $30 including parts and labor.

I saw a jeweler once who had a model chair in gold and silver studded with emeralds, rubies, and sapphires. Selling price? $1500. (it wasn't that big) Basically at cost and a bit. Why? No one knew his name. If Tiffany released the same chair, it would have been sold for $10,000 at least.

This egg is gauche, but it's a lot of gold and some gems. $13000 seems right for a scrap dealer to pay. On the other hand, because some famous guy made it, it's actually worth MILLIONS. But that's just dumb luck. If you can prove Emma Watson waved it around a bit and said "Forgeticus" with it in her hand, you can sell a stick of firewood for a good bit of money. Doesn't make the wood special.


A bolt of cloth is worth very little. A finely-manufactured coat made from that cloth is worth a moderate amount. A coat made by that company and worn by JFK when he was assassinated is priceless. The difference between the three? Provenance. Who used it, when it was used, and what happened while it was used all add together to create historic value beyond money. For example, the Faberge eggs are worth a lot because of their history and historic significance beyond component scrap value.
 
2014-03-20 12:17:47 AM  

non compos mentat: [i.imgur.com image 720x404]

Disappointed, one and all.


It would make an awesome candid camera piece to get these guys

www.tungsten-alloy.com

To make you a fake Fabrige egg, and then take it to a Cash 4 Gold place
 
2014-03-20 12:18:57 AM  

Vlad_the_Inaner: non compos mentat: [i.imgur.com image 720x404]

Disappointed, one and all.

It would make an awesome candid camera piece to get these guys

[www.tungsten-alloy.com image 400x350]

To make you a fake Fabrige egg, and then take it to a Cash 4 Gold place


Or to Pawn Stars.
 
2014-03-20 12:20:18 AM  

rebelyell2006: doglover: rebelyell2006: So, you'd destroy history in the name of making a quick buck?

Not every gaudy piece of jewelry is in fact worth much more than it's components.

Take Tiffany rings. A thin silver ring from Tiffany's with a sapphire so small you need a loupe to see its color properly goes for more than 100 dollars. Anyone who make jewelry can whip up the same damn thing for you, $30 including parts and labor.

I saw a jeweler once who had a model chair in gold and silver studded with emeralds, rubies, and sapphires. Selling price? $1500. (it wasn't that big) Basically at cost and a bit. Why? No one knew his name. If Tiffany released the same chair, it would have been sold for $10,000 at least.

This egg is gauche, but it's a lot of gold and some gems. $13000 seems right for a scrap dealer to pay. On the other hand, because some famous guy made it, it's actually worth MILLIONS. But that's just dumb luck. If you can prove Emma Watson waved it around a bit and said "Forgeticus" with it in her hand, you can sell a stick of firewood for a good bit of money. Doesn't make the wood special.

A bolt of cloth is worth very little. A finely-manufactured coat made from that cloth is worth a moderate amount. A coat made by that company and worn by JFK when he was assassinated is priceless. The difference between the three? Provenance. Who used it, when it was used, and what happened while it was used all add together to create historic value beyond money. For example, the Faberge eggs are worth a lot because of their history and historic significance beyond component scrap value.


Or a different type of example, plowing over Civil War battlefields in order to plant corn, or destroying concentration camps to build Walmarts.
 
2014-03-20 12:21:09 AM  

Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.


It's not just you.  There's some shenanigans going on.  Nobody in that line of business would look at that and consider melting it for scrap.  It's not a crappy rope or ugly ring.  And, if they were dumb enough to melt it, they wouldn't have any trouble selling the melted scrap.

"...the project was put on hold when he was unable to find a buyer..."

Bull.  Farking.  shiat.  He couldn't find someone to buy a lump of gold?  I don't believe that any more than I believe he intended to melt it any more than I believe he bought it in a legitimate deal for $13,302.  And what the fark is with the two dollars?  If you're going to make up a fake deal, make up a price that makes sense.  The egg's in America so that's not a currency conversion artifact.
 
2014-03-20 12:37:13 AM  

jtown: Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.

It's not just you.  There's some shenanigans going on.  Nobody in that line of business would look at that and consider melting it for scrap.  It's not a crappy rope or ugly ring.  And, if they were dumb enough to melt it, they wouldn't have any trouble selling the melted scrap.

"...the project was put on hold when he was unable to find a buyer..."

Bull.  Farking.  shiat.  He couldn't find someone to buy a lump of gold?  I don't believe that any more than I believe he intended to melt it any more than I believe he bought it in a legitimate deal for $13,302.  And what the fark is with the two dollars?  If you're going to make up a fake deal, make up a price that makes sense.  The egg's in America so that's not a currency conversion artifact.


Scrap metal people are a different breed. They tend to look at things for their value on the metals market, not for their collectors value. What is odd is that an antiques dealer wouldn't know that he was sitting on.
 
2014-03-20 12:38:33 AM  

NickelP: thats the part that doesn't make sense. if all those idiots are paying scrap price to scrap it why did none of them do so?


He tried:

jtown: "...the project was put on hold when he was unable to find a buyer..."

Bull. Farking. shiat. He couldn't find someone to buy a lump of gold? I don't believe that any more than I believe he intended to melt it any more than I believe he bought it in a legitimate deal for $13,302. And what the fark is with the two dollars? If you're going to make up a fake deal, make up a price that makes sense. The egg's in America so that's not a currency conversion artifact.


He couldn't find anyone to buy it for the price he wanted- he wanted to make a profit, of course, and it seems he overestimated what the scrap value was. He paid more for the egg than it was actually worth in scrap value, so nobody would buy it to scrap it.

Stupidity up and down the ladder explains every single question people have about this story. People involved, from top to bottom, had no idea what to do because this was so far out of their range of knowledge and experience that they simply didn't have a frame of reference beyond, "hey, random gold and jewels, how much are those worth?"
 
2014-03-20 12:39:22 AM  
i167.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-20 12:51:47 AM  

NickelP: Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Tellingthem: NickelP: Radak: This one has a little bit more information and makes somewhat more sense.  Also includes a link to the article he found which told him it deserved a better home than sitting next to his salt and pepper shakers.

thats a little better, I still am not buying some flea market sold a 15k egg to someone buying on weight for scrap, who also was too lazy to weigh it and overestimated its gold content, then he proceeded to try to find a buyer but since he paid too much he just let it sit for 10 years rather than cutting his losses. then they are playing up this rags to riches poor folks find a treasure thing. poor folks don't buy 15k worth of gold on spec. gold is one of the easiest things in existance to price and no scrappers would sell to someone else to smelt like they are describing.

Yeah I'm a little dubious as well. I can't believe that he didn't try to find out if it had an antiquities value before even thinking about scrapping it. If he was a scrap metal dealer maybe he never considered it. I'm doubtful...but whatever. It's still pretty cool whatever the reason.

dnrtfa but offhand I can think of a couple of reasons that someone would want to downplay how much they knew about this thing before they bought it. The extent to which he took advantage of the seller, the degree to which he suspected it was stolen goods or otherwise iffy, recording it in a misleading way on the books, maybe some more personal/specific reasons since it sounds like he's had it around for a while...

that may make sense if he were buying it for collectable value. for scrap? gold is worth say 1 per ounce. the smelter pays .96. for dudes time he needs something so he will buy at .93 but maybe offers .85 to try to negotiate. no where in this is he going to drop 15k without tossing it on a scale and his bargaining pitch is 'its scrap, let me weigh it and I will give you a price'. no where in that arrangement does he need to find a buyer ...



I'm offering reasons that he might be bullshiatting about this egg, and you're telling me his story smells like bullshiat, so...??
 
2014-03-20 12:56:14 AM  

buzzcut73: [freepatriot.org image 760x1024]

Those things used to be really popular about 100 years ago, but now not too many people want one, so it is going to take up space in my shop for a long time. Best I can do is $20


LOL. Well played
 
2014-03-20 02:06:58 AM  

NickelP: Oldiron_79: rebelyell2006: Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.

Were you around for the threads about the people who discovered gold coins stolen from the mint 100 years ago? Farkers were suggesting melting them down for the raw gold in order to hide any connections to a crime. Never underestimate the destructive power of ignorance and greed.

Id rather melt down (insert most precious art item made of gold) than let the government take it from me at bayonet point and me get nothing for it.

in the situation he is referring to they would get at worst a 25% or so finders fee, which was millions. the scrap value was a tiny fraction of that. keep in mind the coins were literally stolen in a robery of a us mint. so yeah you would be an idiot to melt them and the government paying a pretty hefty finders fee for recovering stuff stolen from them isn't exactly paying nothing and confiscating goods at bayonet point.


Actually no. It was stolen property (gold coins) so you would get jack squat from the us government. The problem is, I believe if I remember that story correctly is that the government would have to melt the coins down anyway which is a crying shame.

Also, this story is dubious as FARK. 10 years? perfect amount of time from it being stolen to when it would resurface to gain legitimacy again.
 
2014-03-20 02:15:41 AM  

doglover: Radak: I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it,


It's gold. Most jewelry is really, really pretty.


But you pop those gems out, melt down the metal, and you can make something even prettier. I look at that egg, I see a home for a nice piece of alexandrite on a pendant and a chain to hang it on.


I look at it and see 20 mil. Gotta like the Vacheron Constantin, adds a bit of class to imo, a rather ugly piece.
 
2014-03-20 03:18:42 AM  
I bet the toy inside is spectacular

img.fark.net
 
2014-03-20 03:40:45 AM  

Radak: [i.imgur.com image 232x306]

I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first?  I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide.  It seems like something that would be worth looking into.  Maybe it's just me.


This.

Also, there are missing Faberge eggs?  I could have sworn I had mine right here in my bedside table.  Goddammit!  It's missing.
 
2014-03-20 03:52:26 AM  

blacksho89: robertus: taxandspend: proteus_b: Radak: I know scrap dealers probably tend to see things in terms of the scrap value alone, but who in his right mind would consider melting down something that looks like this, or even selling it, without finding out what it is first? I don't care if the scrap value is enough for a new doublewide. It seems like something that would be worth looking into. Maybe it's just me.

First off, this! The thing is supposedly one of the great treasures of art and craft, and the guy wants to melt it down?

Secondly, he's all like "I'm just humble folks", but he purchases something for 13,000 dollars (which means he thinks it's worth more than that---otherwise he'd just hang on to his dollars) and then doesn't even investigate it? Or even if he is going to melt it down---doesn't do that either? Sorry, I don't know many "humble folks" that can just toss that kind of cash out the window.

But his world is a world of pick-up trucks and diners... and $13,000 golden eggs. You know, real blue-collar America.

[hulshofschmidt.files.wordpress.com image 620x412]

Since you HAD to make it political for no damn reason..
George Soros, of Progressive Insurance, makes 1.9 million...per hour. 126,000 times what he pays his CSRs (and his CSRs start at a pretty good wage for the skillset.) We REALLY need to do something about that old income inequality, don't we.


Yes we do
 
2014-03-20 03:54:21 AM  

cptjeff: ongbok: NickelP: that article makes no sense. he bought it to melt it down but held onto it for a decade? if he was going to melt it why did he need a buyer? that entire thing was just illogical bullshiat.

No what doesn't make sense is that an antiques dealer didn't know that they had the holy grail of antiques and sold it for 13000.

Probably wasn't an antiques dealer so much as a guy who was asked to come in and manage the estate sale. There's a reason collectors hit those things every weekend- families are often just trying to clear Great Uncle Mike's stuff out of the house so they can sell it and be done with the affair, and a lot of rare and expensive stuff gets put out with $10 price tags. Valuable paintings get found at those things all the time, and small knick-nacks where the value isn't immediately obvious get sold for nothing all the time. The people trying to sell the stuff off are often the kids of the owner- they're not antiquities experts, and it often doesn't cross their minds to do serious research.


can't be an easy way to make a living.  For every diamond in the rough that you find at an estate sale, you'll find 10,000 pieces of shiat.

It really makes me wonder why some stuff is considered valuable.  "Oh, it's rare".  Well, maybe it's rare for a reason like it's a piece of crap and no one wants it."But it's old!"  So is the dirt in my yard, but nobody wants it.
 
2014-03-20 04:59:16 AM  
This whole thing strikes me as the basis for a Coen brothers movie plot--or a game of Fiasco!
 
2014-03-20 07:49:05 AM  

NickelP: thats the part that doesn't make sense. if all those idiots are paying scrap price to scrap it why did none of them do so?


Waiting for the value of an investment to increase makes perfect sense.
 
2014-03-20 08:00:04 AM  

NickelP: that article makes no sense. he bought it to melt it down but held onto it for a decade? if he was going to melt it why did he need a buyer? that entire thing was just illogical bullshiat.


Yeah it smells. Melt it down my butt.

May I suggest that at some point this was/is stolen property?

The fact he held onto it for so long implies he knew it was stolen.  I will bet he cannot give the full details of the person he bought it of.
 
2014-03-20 08:13:09 AM  

Langdon_777: May I suggest that at some point this was/is stolen property?


Well, obviously. The Bolsheviks didn't exactly ask the Romanovs politely, and whoever brought it out of Russia sometime between the '20s and '60s probably didn't have permission.
 
2014-03-20 08:15:16 AM  

devine: [img1.wikia.nocookie.net image 452x653]


Came for Faberege egg addiction, leaving satisfied.
 
2014-03-20 08:17:14 AM  

Spaceballer: [i167.photobucket.com image 612x792]


I want that hanging from my living room wall.  Does it come in velvet?
 
2014-03-20 08:17:56 AM  
McCarthy said the scrap dealer is "petrified" of his newfound wealth becoming public knowledge.

 Well make sure you go straight to the media then!
 
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