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(CNN)   Athletes file class action lawsuit against NCAA saying that amateurism is a myth, will pay their legal fees from their monthly athletic stipend   (cnn.com) divider line 53
    More: Followup, amateurism, NCAA, class-action, NFL lockout, Jeffrey Kessler, Atlantic coast, Huma, football  
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592 clicks; posted to Sports » on 19 Mar 2014 at 10:11 AM (35 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-19 09:18:45 AM  
"What we are saying is that it is fundamentally unfair for there to be rules that prevent athletes who create all of this to receive nothing in return," Kessler said.

Anybody have anything to add? No? I guess that's the thread then.
 
2014-03-19 09:55:29 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-03-19 10:14:20 AM  
Good. The entire college sports industry should be re-worked.
 
2014-03-19 10:16:09 AM  
Set sports free from the yoke of education.
 
2014-03-19 10:27:51 AM  

The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.


eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.
 
2014-03-19 10:35:59 AM  

Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.


Well they'd be making more money so they'd probably be ok with that. Actual money instead of totally worth 30 grand athletic scholarship for a degree they won't get.
 
2014-03-19 10:41:51 AM  

Voiceofreason01: "What we are saying is that it is fundamentally unfair for there to be rules that prevent athletes who create all of this to receive nothing in return," Kessler said.

Anybody have anything to add? No? I guess that's the thread then.


I do:

OMGFOOBAW!!!!
 
2014-03-19 10:45:43 AM  

Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.


How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.
 
2014-03-19 10:53:26 AM  

Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.


And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?
 
2014-03-19 11:03:29 AM  

APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?


They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.
 
2014-03-19 11:05:30 AM  

Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.


Exactly who is bringing in 'big bucks' for a corporation that is only making $10/hr?

Grocery clerks aren't exactly processing the kind of money big school football and basketball players do for a school.
 
2014-03-19 11:05:48 AM  
So, can we extend this to any activity that generates revenue for a school?

/Musician
 
2014-03-19 11:06:51 AM  

Deneb81: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

Exactly who is bringing in 'big bucks' for a corporation that is only making $10/hr?

Grocery clerks aren't exactly processing the kind of money big school football and basketball players do for a school.


Been to a Wal-Mart lately?
 
2014-03-19 11:09:07 AM  
Financial issues aside, it's really farked up that the minor leagues of the NBA and NFL are associated with and managed by education institutions.
 
2014-03-19 11:10:55 AM  

PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?

They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.


Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?
 
2014-03-19 11:18:53 AM  
APO_Buddha:
Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Do you have a source for that? How is it even possible for a Division I school to lose money on their athletics program?
 
2014-03-19 11:23:46 AM  

APO_Buddha: PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?

They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.

Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?


[citation needed]
 
2014-03-19 11:27:24 AM  

APO_Buddha: Let me reword my question. Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?



You may fail to realize what this lawsuit will do if it succeeds - it opens up football to those that make the most to pay the most.  Schools like Ohio will likely eliminate their football programs, or do exactly what they do now and only get players willing to play for a scholarship but no actual pay.  They'll make football an intramural activity, and shrink marketing and such accordingly.

USC, Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, etc will pay by position, skill, etc, and run semi-professional teams.  Signing bonuses, the whole schtick.  The disparity between quality of teams will grow a great deal (even beyond what it is now).  You'll have semi-pro teams playing to get into the NFL, and a smattering of players at the non/low paying schools walking on to teams at draft time.  It'll truly be the "haves and have nots" in football.

Many people are ok with this, and want this to be the standard.  But make no mistake, there won't be 120ish FBS/Div I teams when it's done.  There will be a LOT less.
 
2014-03-19 11:33:13 AM  
*shrugs* the concept of amateurism was invented to screw people over, that is its original intention was to create barriers

it's only been since the general wealth and opportunity had risen for everybody that amateurism became something different

everything was fine and dandy - opportunity knocks and all - until money got so huge and amateur leagues basically became minor leagues that the whole thing started to stink, i mean at this point the corpse of amateurism is just stinking up the place and people are coming to grip with the reality of disposing of it
 
2014-03-19 11:35:03 AM  

Khellendros: You may fail to realize what this lawsuit will do if it succeeds - it opens up football to those that make the most to pay the most.  Schools like Ohio will likely eliminate their football programs, or do exactly what they do now and only get players willing to play for a scholarship but no actual pay.  They'll make football an intramural activity, and shrink marketing and such accordingly.

USC, Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, etc will pay by position, skill, etc, and run semi-professional teams.  Signing bonuses, the whole schtick.  The disparity between quality of teams will grow a great deal (even beyond what it is now).  You'll have semi-pro teams playing to get into the NFL, and a smattering of players at the non/low paying schools walking on to teams at draft time.  It'll truly be the "haves and have nots" in football.

Many people are ok with this, and want this to be the standard.  But make no mistake, there won't be 120ish FBS/Div I teams when it's done.  There will be a LOT less.


Hhmmm, maybe, It depends how you reorganize. You could come up with a salary cap at the league or division level. Or some kind of profit sharing at the Conference level. It's FAR from a sure thing that this lawsuit will even go anywhere. But I think you're right that it could really hurt smaller schools.
 
2014-03-19 11:42:04 AM  

Khellendros: APO_Buddha: Let me reword my question. Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?


You may fail to realize what this lawsuit will do if it succeeds - it opens up football to those that make the most to pay the most.  Schools like Ohio will likely eliminate their football programs, or do exactly what they do now and only get players willing to play for a scholarship but no actual pay.  They'll make football an intramural activity, and shrink marketing and such accordingly.

USC, Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, etc will pay by position, skill, etc, and run semi-professional teams.  Signing bonuses, the whole schtick.  The disparity between quality of teams will grow a great deal (even beyond what it is now).  You'll have semi-pro teams playing to get into the NFL, and a smattering of players at the non/low paying schools walking on to teams at draft time.  It'll truly be the "haves and have nots" in football.

Many people are ok with this, and want this to be the standard.  But make no mistake, there won't be 120ish FBS/Div I teams when it's done.  There will be a LOT less.


In other words, nothing will change at all.
 
2014-03-19 11:49:46 AM  

Voiceofreason01: APO_Buddha:
Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Do you have a source for that? How is it even possible for a Division I school to lose money on their athletics program?


PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?

They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.

Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

[citation needed]


http://www.athensnews.com/ohio/article-32491-athletics-remains-at-th e- heart-of-the-ou-budget-debate.html

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/05/20/ohio

http://thepost.ohiou.edu/content/largest-chunk-general-fee-promised- at hleticsThis last one is the student newspaper, so the writing is not the best.
 
2014-03-19 11:51:25 AM  

PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?

They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.

Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

[citation needed]


That might not be such a good idea for him.  As of 2011, Ohio University's entire athletic department generated more than $1.3 million in profit, most of which did NOT come from the football program ($82,000 profit).

But everybody knows that a great deal of creative accounting goes into these calculations.  For example, when a university gives an athlete a scholarship, that scholarship is based on the full cost-of-attendance, regardless of whether or not an athlete is an in-state student.  In our case of Ohio University, that difference is about $9,000 per year.  If two-thirds of the school's roster is from Ohio (just a guess, I can't access the numbers at work), that means that roughly $500,000 every year that could be considered program profit is going to the school as an expense.

They also usually don't count booster donations.  For example, Kansas is building a $17.5 million dorm specifically to house basketball players (and a handful of lucky students to placate the NCAA).  It's being funded mostly through private donations and I doubt the KU basketball programs are going to be counting that funding as "revenue."
 
2014-03-19 12:00:08 PM  

APO_Buddha: http://www.athensnews.com/ohio/article-32491-athletics-remains-at-th e- heart-of-the-ou-budget-debate.html

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/05/20/ohio

http://thepost.ohiou.edu/content/largest-chunk-general-fee-promised- at hleticsThis last one is the student newspaper, so the writing is not the best.


Interesting, thanks.
 
2014-03-19 12:03:45 PM  

Voiceofreason01: "What we are saying is that it is fundamentally unfair for there to be rules that prevent athletes who create all of this to receive nothing in return," Kessler said.

Anybody have anything to add? No? I guess that's the thread then.


Graduate students would laugh at this argument, but taking the time away from the professor's project to do that would get their name removed from the paper.
 
2014-03-19 12:07:40 PM  

Truman Burbank: Voiceofreason01: "What we are saying is that it is fundamentally unfair for there to be rules that prevent athletes who create all of this to receive nothing in return," Kessler said.

Anybody have anything to add? No? I guess that's the thread then.

Graduate students would laugh at this argument, but taking the time away from the professor's project to do that would get their name removed from the paper.


my experience is that they frequently do.
 
2014-03-19 12:13:23 PM  

Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.


Except that is not the way it would work at all.  College level athletes do not represent a fungible asset the same way assembly line workers do.  Basic economics, there is a limited supply of athletes with the necessary skill set to even compete at the collegiate level, much less elevate a program to national title contention.  Assuming that the NCAA under this new system would be forbidden from colluding on fixing salaries and maintaining them at an artificially low level the market would dictate what Salaries could be offered to Collegiate athletes and given that NCAA sports generate billions in revenue annually, the market could definitely support some six figure salaries for better recruits.
 
2014-03-19 12:14:23 PM  

APO_Buddha: PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?

They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.

Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?


Why would you even have an athletic program if it's incapable of breaking even?
 
2014-03-19 12:28:49 PM  

regindyn: APO_Buddha: PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?

They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.

Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Why would you even have an athletic program if it's incapable of breaking even?


Because visibility is an important part of a school maintaining its status/renown/brand.
 
2014-03-19 12:39:34 PM  

MFAWG: Deneb81: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

Exactly who is bringing in 'big bucks' for a corporation that is only making $10/hr?

Grocery clerks aren't exactly processing the kind of money big school football and basketball players do for a school.

Been to a Wal-Mart lately?


You think anyone working the floor at Walmart is bringing in millions of dollars for the company by doing their job?
In what world?
 
2014-03-19 12:47:58 PM  

Deneb81: MFAWG: Deneb81: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

Exactly who is bringing in 'big bucks' for a corporation that is only making $10/hr?

Grocery clerks aren't exactly processing the kind of money big school football and basketball players do for a school.

Been to a Wal-Mart lately?

You think anyone working the floor at Walmart is bringing in millions of dollars for the company by doing their job?
In what world?


There are people who believe because they just sold a $500 T.V. to a customer that cost the company $300, they just made the company $200.

There is a reason why these people work minimum wage cashier jobs.
 
2014-03-19 01:04:31 PM  

APO_Buddha: Voiceofreason01: APO_Buddha:
Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Do you have a source for that? How is it even possible for a Division I school to lose money on their athletics program?

PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: PowerSlacker: APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?

They lose that money funding scholarships for non-revenue sports.  No worries for the football players.

Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

[citation needed]

http://www.athensnews.com/ohio/article-32491-athletics-remains-at-th e- heart-of-the-ou-budget-debate.html

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/05/20/ohio

http://thepost.ohiou.edu/content/largest-chunk-general-fee-promised- at hleticsThis last one is the student newspaper, so the writing is not the best.


I see. You're subtracting student fees from athletic department revenues.

There wouldn't be anything saying that institutions HAVE to pay players more, just that they can't cap the payment at the cost of college tuition.  So Ohio could keep offering its players an athletic scholarship, they would just lose out on players who want to go elsewhere for more.

Functionally, what you'd likely see is that the Big Five conferences would break off to form a new division, where they could pay players what they deserve and the lesser schools would stay behind.
 
2014-03-19 01:19:39 PM  

Voiceofreason01: APO_Buddha:
Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Do you have a source for that? How is it even possible for a Division I school to lose money on their athletics program?


Why is this such a common misconception? When I went to Western Michigan, the events were FREE to all students. Football, hockey, everything. All we had to do was show our ID to be addmitted. I think this was in part to make sure we had the minimum attendence required by the conference. There's a difference between being profitable and relying on donations and other funding to remain afloat.

I confess I DNRTFA, because it's blocked here at work, but there can not be a solution that is a simple as "pay the basketball and football players". The other athletes (and musicians, and theatre, etc etc) put as much time and work into their craft. There are likely other D1 sports that make money for a few schools but don't for a majority of others, like Men's Hockey.

Here's a list of profitable programs. Note how quickly the revenues drop. Search for your school, even. Western's not on the list, but North Dakota is: http://kaarme.com/Most_Profitable_College_Athletic_Programs
 
2014-03-19 01:25:44 PM  
*admitted, attendance

/yipes
//I graduated, I swear
 
2014-03-19 01:29:15 PM  

Disaster Transport: Voiceofreason01: APO_Buddha:
Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Do you have a source for that? How is it even possible for a Division I school to lose money on their athletics program?

Why is this such a common misconception? When I went to Western Michigan, the events were FREE to all students. Football, hockey, everything. All we had to do was show our ID to be addmitted. I think this was in part to make sure we had the minimum attendence required by the conference. There's a difference between being profitable and relying on donations and other funding to remain afloat.

I confess I DNRTFA, because it's blocked here at work, but there can not be a solution that is a simple as "pay the basketball and football players". The other athletes (and musicians, and theatre, etc etc) put as much time and work into their craft. There are likely other D1 sports that make money for a few schools but don't for a majority of others, like Men's Hockey.

Here's a list of profitable programs. Note how quickly the revenues drop. Search for your school, even. Western's not on the list, but North Dakota is: http://kaarme.com/Most_Profitable_College_Athletic_Programs


I don't think it was the case at Western (only took 2 classes there in high school), but at UAF we paid an athletics fee each semester that basically paid for the tickets, regardless of whether we went or not.
 
2014-03-19 01:49:20 PM  

Khellendros: APO_Buddha: Let me reword my question. Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?


You may fail to realize what this lawsuit will do if it succeeds - it opens up football to those that make the most to pay the most.  Schools like Ohio will likely eliminate their football programs, or do exactly what they do now and only get players willing to play for a scholarship but no actual pay.  They'll make football an intramural activity, and shrink marketing and such accordingly.

USC, Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, etc will pay by position, skill, etc, and run semi-professional teams.  Signing bonuses, the whole schtick.  The disparity between quality of teams will grow a great deal (even beyond what it is now).  You'll have semi-pro teams playing to get into the NFL, and a smattering of players at the non/low paying schools walking on to teams at draft time.  It'll truly be the "haves and have nots" in football.

Many people are ok with this, and want this to be the standard.  But make no mistake, there won't be 120ish FBS/Div I teams when it's done.  There will be a LOT less.


Title IX will kill this idea- for every $ spent on a football and basketball player bringing in revenue, the schools will have to pay the same to revenue-losing women athletes. The schools who can afford this (10 or less) won't want to support it.
 
2014-03-19 02:05:37 PM  

bob4pres: Title IX will kill this idea- for every $ spent on a football and basketball player bringing in revenue, the schools will have to pay the same to revenue-losing women athletes. The schools who can afford this (10 or less) won't want to support it.


Schools have been successfully dodging this for years.  I doubt it'll be an issue.
 
2014-03-19 02:08:39 PM  

APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?


The lawsuit isn't asking for any sort of guaranteed money, its not forcing schools to pay. Its just claiming that its illegal for the NCAA and the conferences to band together and outlaw paying athletes and will leave it up to each school to decide if and how much it wants to pay their athletes.
 
2014-03-19 02:13:57 PM  
It's strange, because - for example - many thousands of people are Penn State fans, but nobody is going to give two shiats about the Midstate Lions as a minor league team with the Steelers and Eagles playing pro football.
 
2014-03-19 02:29:56 PM  
Maybe they can change it to guranteed scholorships regardless of injuries. Or you play football at college because you want to and not because they'll pull your scholorship if you want to focus on your education.
If its about their education, they should have a secured education with resources dedicated to see to it that they achieve academicly


At the same time, its not fair to profit of someones name and likeness without some form of revenue sharing.
 
2014-03-19 03:30:52 PM  

APO_Buddha: Brokenseas: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

How many people can stock shelves at a grocery store vs. how many can play football at a college level?

Hint:  Alabama, Penn State and USC will be paying their players a hell of a lot more than $10 an hour.  And I bet they'll throw in scholarships to boot.

Smaller schools will probably pay $10 an hour plus a scholarship.

And at smaller schools that lose $15 million a year on athletics (Such as Ohio University), where will that money come from?


Simple free markets libtard ... government bail outs like any other good capitalist company.
 
2014-03-19 03:56:19 PM  

Deneb81: MFAWG: Deneb81: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

Exactly who is bringing in 'big bucks' for a corporation that is only making $10/hr?

Grocery clerks aren't exactly processing the kind of money big school football and basketball players do for a school.

Been to a Wal-Mart lately?

You think anyone working the floor at Walmart is bringing in millions of dollars for the company by doing their job?
In what world?


Wal-Mart can't get the shelves stocked because they won't hire any employees to do so.

Do you think that be impacting sales?
 
2014-03-19 03:59:03 PM  
Err, might be impacting sales even.

Maybe Supply Side Jesus will provide a miracle.
 
2014-03-19 04:32:31 PM  

Disaster Transport: Voiceofreason01: APO_Buddha:
Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Do you have a source for that? How is it even possible for a Division I school to lose money on their athletics program?

Why is this such a common misconception? When I went to Western Michigan, the events were FREE to all students. Football, hockey, everything. All we had to do was show our ID to be addmitted. I think this was in part to make sure we had the minimum attendence required by the conference. There's a difference between being profitable and relying on donations and other funding to remain afloat.

I confess I DNRTFA, because it's blocked here at work, but there can not be a solution that is a simple as "pay the basketball and football players". The other athletes (and musicians, and theatre, etc etc) put as much time and work into their craft. There are likely other D1 sports that make money for a few schools but don't for a majority of others, like Men's Hockey.

Here's a list of profitable programs. Note how quickly the revenues drop. Search for your school, even. Western's not on the list, but North Dakota is: http://kaarme.com/Most_Profitable_College_Athletic_Programs


Wahoowa! UVa is pretty high for a school that typically has mediocre football and basketball success. Must be those sweet sweet soccer and lacrosse dollars
 
2014-03-19 04:38:00 PM  
Small stipend for high profile sports.  Allow low profile sports athletes to earn money on the side up to $X.  Profit share with all those jerseys sold at the stadium with a player's name and/or number on them.
 
2014-03-19 04:55:03 PM  

PowerSlacker: Khellendros: APO_Buddha: Let me reword my question. Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?


You may fail to realize what this lawsuit will do if it succeeds - it opens up football to those that make the most to pay the most.  Schools like Ohio will likely eliminate their football programs, or do exactly what they do now and only get players willing to play for a scholarship but no actual pay.  They'll make football an intramural activity, and shrink marketing and such accordingly.

USC, Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, etc will pay by position, skill, etc, and run semi-professional teams.  Signing bonuses, the whole schtick.  The disparity between quality of teams will grow a great deal (even beyond what it is now).  You'll have semi-pro teams playing to get into the NFL, and a smattering of players at the non/low paying schools walking on to teams at draft time.  It'll truly be the "haves and have nots" in football.

Many people are ok with this, and want this to be the standard.  But make no mistake, there won't be 120ish FBS/Div I teams when it's done.  There will be a LOT less.

In other words, nothing will change at all.


Exactly. What Khellendros wrote applies to the current FBS. Any way you slice it, there are not 120 teams competing for the National Championship or even the bowl games in general.
 
2014-03-19 05:11:14 PM  

Deneb81: Waldo Pepper: The Muthaship: Set sports free from the yoke of education.

eliminated scholarships and pay them $10 a hour like a lot of folks get who bring in big bucks for major corporations and see if they think that is fair.

Exactly who is bringing in 'big bucks' for a corporation that is only making $10/hr?

Grocery clerks aren't exactly processing the kind of money big school football and basketball players do for a school.


Tire techs at Major chain tire stores.
 
2014-03-19 05:29:50 PM  

Disaster Transport: Voiceofreason01: APO_Buddha:
Let me reword my question.  Schools like Ohio University loose their ass on every single sport, so where will the money come from?

Do you have a source for that? How is it even possible for a Division I school to lose money on their athletics program?

Why is this such a common misconception? When I went to Western Michigan, the events were FREE to all students. Football, hockey, everything. All we had to do was show our ID to be addmitted. I think this was in part to make sure we had the minimum attendence required by the conference. There's a difference between being profitable and relying on donations and other funding to remain afloat.

I confess I DNRTFA, because it's blocked here at work, but there can not be a solution that is a simple as "pay the basketball and football players". The other athletes (and musicians, and theatre, etc etc) put as much time and work into their craft. There are likely other D1 sports that make money for a few schools but don't for a majority of others, like Men's Hockey.

Here's a list of profitable programs. Note how quickly the revenues drop. Search for your school, even. Western's not on the list, but North Dakota is: http://kaarme.com/Most_Profitable_College_Athletic_Programs


I worked for 3 different NCAA athletic programs (Mo. Valley, Big Ten and Big 12) during my collegiate and grad school years and because of my Finance background I was always assigned accounting and business-centric jobs and projects.

And I 100% unequivocally can say without a shadow of doubt that I've NEVER seen such shady and deceptive Finance and Accounting practices in my business career as I routinely saw at those 3 schools and my network of like-careered individuals reports the same bullshiat at other schools.

For example, when my Big 12 school had a booster/alumni fundraiser tied to a home football game (which was 100% of the time for EVERY home game) the money collected from the fundraiser was NEVER tied to athletic revenues.  Let me restate that...many times they would make announcements at halftime on the stadium PA about the fundraiser and the Football and Athletic program was credited 0.0% revenue from that fundraiser...which is total bullshiat as virtually none of the boosters nor alumni would be on campus on a Saturday unless to watch the football game.

Another example.  At my Big 10 school, the basketball program ran the school and Capital One and the Athletic Dept worked out a deal where Capital One would hire students to get people to sign up for Big 10 School branded Capital One credit cards IN THE STADIUM concourses before, during and after the game.  Again, the Athletic program got ZERO credit for the high six figures the University made on this deal in spite of the fact that those concourses wouldn't even be open to the public without a home basketball game on the schedule.

So when NCAA member institutions quote the "we don't make money on our Athletic programs" that answer is 100% without a doubt bullshiat...the revenues come in...they just don't get credited as Athletic department revenue, they ALWAYS get credited to another department.
 
2014-03-19 05:44:47 PM  
BTW, this Friday afternoon, I will be getting my 9th MRI on my neck and upper spine since my CFB playing days to determine how much disc degeneration has occurred since 3 years ago (my last MRI) and to see if spinal fusion surgery is necessary.

Thankfully my employer has great insurance and it will only cost me $295 for a procedure that is routinely billed in the $1,200-$1,500 range...my Employer's Health Care provider will pick up the rest of the bill.

My school...who I played 2 years of Big 12 CFB for, has paid for ZERO of these tests in spite of my numerous request for them to do so given that I suffered this injury during my last CFB game my sophomore (I was a LB, making a tackle, got hit from the side by friendly fire) and had to immediately retire from football.

Why won't they pay for it?  Because they've argued that in spite of medical evidence that my neck was fractured from the hit, I was knocked completely TFO and the game film shows clear as day how it happened...my school says that the injury may have happened in high school or previous football and there is no way to really tell that they are liable for the injury.  Of course this notice came coincidentally via registered mail to my Dad's house 3 days after the University's docs told me that I would never play again.

And yes, I could have sued...multiple attorneys have told me that I had a very solid case, but the University basically told me that they would honor my scholarship if I would sign away my rights to sue...so it was either:

1)  Sue the school...which may result in some money earned, but then I'd have to pay for school, or
2)  Agree not to sue and keep my scholarship

THIS kind of bullshiat is why these players are suing...because you are nothing more than a disposable work product to these farkers...while they pocket billions and billions on our back...they won't pay one red cent for medical treatment CLEARLY tied to athletic competition that helped them earn all this money.

I hope they take them to the cleaners...
 
2014-03-19 08:39:17 PM  

Coach_J: BTW, this Friday afternoon, I will be getting my 9th MRI on my neck and upper spine since my CFB playing days to determine how much disc degeneration has occurred since 3 years ago (my last MRI) and to see if spinal fusion surgery is necessary.

Thankfully my employer has great insurance and it will only cost me $295 for a procedure that is routinely billed in the $1,200-$1,500 range...my Employer's Health Care provider will pick up the rest of the bill.

My school...who I played 2 years of Big 12 CFB for, has paid for ZERO of these tests in spite of my numerous request for them to do so given that I suffered this injury during my last CFB game my sophomore (I was a LB, making a tackle, got hit from the side by friendly fire) and had to immediately retire from football.

Why won't they pay for it?  Because they've argued that in spite of medical evidence that my neck was fractured from the hit, I was knocked completely TFO and the game film shows clear as day how it happened...my school says that the injury may have happened in high school or previous football and there is no way to really tell that they are liable for the injury.  Of course this notice came coincidentally via registered mail to my Dad's house 3 days after the University's docs told me that I would never play again.

And yes, I could have sued...multiple attorneys have told me that I had a very solid case, but the University basically told me that they would honor my scholarship if I would sign away my rights to sue...so it was either:

1)  Sue the school...which may result in some money earned, but then I'd have to pay for school, or
2)  Agree not to sue and keep my scholarship

THIS kind of bullshiat is why these players are suing...because you are nothing more than a disposable work product to these farkers...while they pocket billions and billions on our back...they won't pay one red cent for medical treatment CLEARLY tied to athletic competition that helped them earn all this money.

I hope the ...


I do agree they should cover your medical but, I'm curious in this day and age what type of gun were they using?
 
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