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(Space.com)   Here's how to watch the giant asteroid that will eclipse a star this week, at least if you live on the east coast   (space.com) divider line 21
    More: Cool, eclipses, Regulus, Sky & Telescope, gas giants, citizen scientist, light pollution, Slooh, DSLR  
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1535 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Mar 2014 at 11:45 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-18 10:05:27 AM  
So if the light pollution of the Eastern seaboard didn't preclude anyone from seeing more than Sirius and Polaris on a clear night, than they might see this sight to behold?
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-18 10:53:00 AM  
I learned from one of the overhyped comets of the last millennium not to travel to see an astronomical event.
 
2014-03-18 11:31:21 AM  

ZAZ: I learned from one of the overhyped comets of the last millennium not to travel to see an astronomical event.


Aw c'mon, Comet Ison had great potential, before it burned up going around the Sun.
 
2014-03-18 12:17:08 PM  
It'll be a sight to behold, however I'm snoozing during those hours.
 
2014-03-18 12:19:16 PM  
Damn, if only they didn't close my rooftop terrace at 11pm every night!
 
2014-03-18 12:25:01 PM  
So are they turning out the lights in New York City that night? It seems like the only city from which this would be visible judging by the map
 
2014-03-18 12:36:55 PM  

FTFA:

Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo and is bright enough to spot with the naked eye.
Wow that's some impressive science-o-fying there journalist chick.

You're saying the brightest star in a constellation described by the second century astronomer Ptolemy is visible with the naked eye?

Whoda thunk it!?
 
2014-03-18 12:45:16 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: So if the light pollution of the Eastern seaboard didn't preclude anyone from seeing more than Sirius and Polaris on a clear night, than they might see this sight to behold?


Regulus is brighter than Polaris. You should be able to see it even from the heart of NYC if it's clear.

I'd stay up for this if I were in the viewing range. I know they asked for observers outside the range in case there's an undetected companion, but I'm not liking my odds that much.

I can't imagine being out looking at a familiar constellation, and having its brightest star just suddenly wink the fark out.
 
2014-03-18 12:55:31 PM  

jfarkinB: I can't imagine being out looking at a familiar constellation, and having its brightest star just suddenly wink the fark out.


www.chronicle.su
 
2014-03-18 12:59:53 PM  
I'm right on the edge of the shadow path, but the weather outlook is not looking good.
 
2014-03-18 01:05:17 PM  
Still not a good enough reason to go to Oswego in March.
 
2014-03-18 01:10:34 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: So if the light pollution of the Eastern seaboard didn't preclude anyone from seeing more than Sirius and Polaris on a clear night, than they might see this sight to behold?


There are over thirty stars in the northern hemisphere sky that are brighter than Polaris. Did you mean some other bright star?

In particular, if you can see enough of the Big Dipper to find Polaris, you'll be able to see Regulus.
 
2014-03-18 01:53:25 PM  

jfarkinB: InterruptingQuirk: So if the light pollution of the Eastern seaboard didn't preclude anyone from seeing more than Sirius and Polaris on a clear night, than they might see this sight to behold?

Regulus is brighter than Polaris. You should be able to see it even from the heart of NYC if it's clear.

I'd stay up for this if I were in the viewing range. I know they asked for observers outside the range in case there's an undetected companion, but I'm not liking my odds that much.

I can't imagine being out looking at a familiar constellation, and having its brightest star just suddenly wink the fark out.


Yeah, I should have said Sirius and ~Vega or Canopus or something to make my hyperbole more effective.

/I'm still skeptical on the visibility of even those celestial bodies in NYC. Light wash is getting out of control.
 
2014-03-18 02:18:31 PM  
You can definitely see Regulus in NYC.  This'll be fun.
 
2014-03-18 02:18:44 PM  

jfarkinB: InterruptingQuirk: So if the light pollution of the Eastern seaboard didn't preclude anyone from seeing more than Sirius and Polaris on a clear night, than they might see this sight to behold?

Regulus is brighter than Polaris. You should be able to see it even from the heart of NYC if it's clear.

I'd stay up for this if I were in the viewing range. I know they asked for observers outside the range in case there's an undetected companion, but I'm not liking my odds that much.

I can't imagine being out looking at a familiar constellation, and having its brightest star just suddenly wink the fark out.


Bad Wolf
 
2014-03-18 03:34:45 PM  
That might be worth a trip into the city for me... but not that early in the morning.  I'll watch video of it when it gets posted.
 
2014-03-18 06:50:05 PM  
A giant-assed what now?
 
2014-03-18 10:42:33 PM  

OnlyM3: FTFA:Regulus is the brightest star in the constellation Leo and is bright enough to spot with the naked eye. Wow that's some impressive science-o-fying there journalist chick.

You're saying the brightest star in a constellation described by the second century astronomer Ptolemy is visible with the naked eye?

Whoda thunk it!?


Because the simple statement of a relevant fact should have been eschewed for a nobody-gives-a-shiat history lesson unimportant to the upcoming event.

You really are dumb.
 
2014-03-19 09:15:52 AM  
ArcadianRefugee
2014-03-18 10:42:33 PM

Because the simple statement of a relevant fact should have been eschewed for a nobody-gives-a-shiat history lesson unimportant to the upcoming event.

You really are dumb.


The point was that this constellation was made up by people who had no telescopes. Sorry you're too slow to keep up. Obviously it is visible to the naked eye.

// but happy to see you had to resort to ad hominem to try to make a point
/// and that mods approve of your violating TOS.
 
2014-03-19 10:32:22 AM  

mikaloyd: So are they turning out the lights in New York City that night? It seems like the only city from which this would be visible judging by the map


FTA: "Regulus shines right through moonlight and light pollution that's in the sky - even the light pollution over a city like New York," said Alan MacRobert

Try reading the whole article next time, dumbass.
 
2014-03-19 11:30:39 AM  
Asteroid Occultations are quite common.  What is rare is an asteroid occulting a first magnitude star which is naked eye visible.  The path width of the event is the same as the diameter of the asteroid - in this case about 70 km and goes over the Big Apple and northward through New York State and into eastern Ontario.
My astronomy club had planned an expedition to the path about 2 hours east of Toronto to time the occultation on video.  Alas, the weather is totally farked.

Here's a constantly updated list of worldwide asteroid occultations:   http://www.asteroidoccultation.com/

Every day there are several events but for one to pass exactly over your house is much more rare.  Observers of these events commonly travel a couple of hundred kilometres....

/Amateur astronomer since 1960
 
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