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(Deseret News)   This is bad news . . . for Sarah Connor   (deseretnews.com) divider line 19
    More: Interesting, technological change, global workforce, information technology  
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4255 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Mar 2014 at 12:21 AM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-18 12:26:24 AM
I see what you did there, headline writer for Deseret News.
 
2014-03-18 12:32:15 AM
He's already dead.
 
2014-03-18 12:46:21 AM
There's a heck of a lot of jobs that involve driving things around that are going to completely disappear probably in the next 10-20 years with the rise of self-driving cars. Most jobs won't completely cease like that, but a lot will see increased automation leading to increased productivity leading to one person doing the job of two or three people.

Assuming no other industry arises to absorb those jobs we could be looking at 50% or more unemployment. Fun times.
 
2014-03-18 12:54:35 AM

Gunther: There's a heck of a lot of jobs that involve driving things around that are going to completely disappear probably in the next 10-20 years with the rise of self-driving cars. Most jobs won't completely cease like that, but a lot will see increased automation leading to increased productivity leading to one person doing the job of two or three people.

Assuming no other industry arises to absorb those jobs we could be looking at 50% or more unemployment. Fun times.


And fast food. Its getting to the point where robot can do as shiatty a job as the jackholes who don't care enough to get a two item order right - every farking time!
 
2014-03-18 01:04:01 AM
This was last until the Butlerian Jihad.
 
2014-03-18 01:08:23 AM
Wait, you're telling me that a machine could possible replace a human in a workplace environment? I frankly don't believes this. Now if you don't mind I have to have the secretary pool type up some memos for the companies assembly line workers, so they know not to worry about their positions here going to some machine.
 
2014-03-18 01:14:30 AM

Gunther: There's a heck of a lot of jobs that involve driving things around that are going to completely disappear probably in the next 10-20 years with the rise of self-driving cars. Most jobs won't completely cease like that, but a lot will see increased automation leading to increased productivity leading to one person doing the job of two or three people.

Assuming no other industry arises to absorb those jobs we could be looking at 50% or more unemployment. Fun times.


Industrial Revolution.

80% working in agriculture, poverty
5% working in agriculture, a 5x increase in population, amazing wealth.

Information Revolution

lh3.ggpht.com

lh3.ggpht.com

Yes, there's the household income issue (at least in part because of stalled male incomes and the rise of the single mother), and the Dire Problem*, but we can work around them.  We've got a $16 Trillion income and $2 Trillion of income redistribution in this country.  Ok fine, most of the redistribution is going to rich(er) old people, but that can be changed.

* Stated most boldly, the Dire Problem is that there is a line of productive competence beneath which a human being is a liability, not an asset, to the society including him. [Ed note: This seems to be roughly an IQ of 105] This calculation is made in terms of the marginal human - does California gain or lose by adding one person just like this person? For millions, the answer is surely the latter.

Worse, with the steady advance of technology, this line rises. That is: the demand for low-skilled human labor shrinks. Abstract economics provides no guarantee whatsoever that the marginal able-bodied man with an IQ of 80 can feed himself by his own labors. If you doubt this line, simply lower it until you doubt it no more. At least logically, there is a biological continuum between humans and chimpanzees, and the latter are surely liabilities.

Why does this matter? It matters because either (a) a man can feed himself, or (b) he dies horribly of starvation, or (c) someone else feeds him. If (a), he is an asset. If (c), he is a liability - to someone. If (b), he makes a horrible mess and fuss while dying, and is thus in that sense a liability. Moreover, the presence of the poor becomes extremely unpleasant well before the starvation point.
 
2014-03-18 06:23:33 AM
Not unexpected.
The government's presumption was that business owners will cover mandated wage and benefit increases by simply raising prices.
What they'll do is source lower cost labor ...and raise prices.

img.fark.net

/Everybody loses.
/Well, 99% of everybody.
 
2014-03-18 08:20:21 AM
Those unskilled laborers might want to look into VoTech training now - the need for mechanics will grow exponentially. Somebody will still have to fix these things when they break down.
 
2014-03-18 08:24:40 AM
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-18 08:26:26 AM
But Jobs was already terminated.
 
2014-03-18 08:56:35 AM
So if this restaurant automation is so great did they lower their prices to attract more customers?
 
2014-03-18 09:22:14 AM
She was a shiatty waitperson and she couldn't catch a bullet to end her life.

gorgview.com
 
2014-03-18 09:27:02 AM

RoxtarRyan: He's already dead.


Mytch: But Jobs was already terminated.


ninja`d in the second post...
 
2014-03-18 10:58:54 AM

Lawn_offit: Those unskilled laborers might want to look into VoTech training now - the need for mechanics will grow exponentially. Somebody will still have to fix these things when they break down.


That's until google invents a robot to fix their robots.

/and a robot to fix that robot.
/Its robots, all the way down.
 
2014-03-18 12:37:01 PM

Harry_Seldon: This was last until the Butlerian Jihad.


Came for the Dune reference.  Leaving satisfied.
 
2014-03-18 12:53:10 PM

Prophet of Loss: Gunther: There's a heck of a lot of jobs that involve driving things around that are going to completely disappear probably in the next 10-20 years with the rise of self-driving cars. Most jobs won't completely cease like that, but a lot will see increased automation leading to increased productivity leading to one person doing the job of two or three people.

Assuming no other industry arises to absorb those jobs we could be looking at 50% or more unemployment. Fun times.

And fast food. Its getting to the point where robot can do as shiatty a job as the jackholes who don't care enough to get a two item order right - every farking time!


B-b-but those brain dead slobs need a raise! A living wage!
 
2014-03-18 01:49:03 PM
The main problem of automation is dealing with irregularities. Varying objects that are sloppy, mushy, large, small, thick, thin, area, and mass differences. These are all the jobs that are really hard to automate since you can't just run the same identical code over and over.

Food prep is one of the more inconsistent jobs around for a robot. If you want identical portions of food, about the only option is to grind and mush everything to a pulp. Then you can extrude and form your onion mush, your tomato mush, your pickle mush, and make perfect shaped burgers every time.

But if customers want more than a mushburger then the robot has to deal with things like peeling apart stacks of sliced tomatoes, gripping them just enough to hold it steady, but not so much grip that robot just squishes the tomato and drops it.

For a robot this requires a 3D vision system, an ability to recognize separate objects in a pile of similar shapes and colors, tactile sensing of the objects, awareness of how friction and adhesion works with wet slimy objects, and then how to translate the knowledge of the space into robotic motion to act on and interact with these objects (known as fine motor control, in humans). For a machine designer this is all really hard work.

Or people will just have to get used to cheap mushburgers that can be popped out for 38 cents each by a simplified machine system.
 
2014-03-18 10:47:42 PM

Lawn_offit: Those unskilled laborers might want to look into VoTech training now - the need for mechanics will grow exponentially. Somebody will still have to fix these things when they break down.


Eventually there will be machines to fix the machines.
 
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