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(Wired)   Life finds a way: Worm evolves to eat corn genetically engineered to kill it   (wired.com) divider line 258
    More: Interesting, corn, ecological damage, genetic modifications, biotechnology company, Bacillus thuringiensis, insecticides, agricultural science, National Academy of Sciences  
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7534 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Mar 2014 at 5:31 AM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-19 06:25:14 AM

knobmaker: Don't worry.  Everyone is already testing it.

You know.  Unofficially.

But I'm sure it will be okay.


oooh...that sounds scary. I guess that makes your claim correct.
 
2014-03-19 09:01:45 AM

meat0918: MechTard: meat0918: ciberido: meat0918: ciberido: Sid_6.7: So, call Muad'Dib?

The worm IS the corn.  The corn IS the worm!

A lot of people would do better if they remembered that "Fear is the mind killer".

You are transparent.  I see many things.  I see plans within plans ....

And I see that the guild navigator has a vagina for a mouth.

Seriously, WTF was with that? I know the first navigator was a woman, but DAMN.

Blame Lynch and his creative team, not Herbert's son for that one.


Well, what in this universe is more scary than a vagina?
 
2014-03-19 09:43:28 AM

khyberkitsune: Your argument holds no water


Well that's because you won't share your alchemical horticultural technology with me.
 
2014-03-19 01:11:05 PM
Wow!  Saw this thread yesterday and signed up for an account so I could chime in (been lurking around here for years).  Having to wait the 6 hours before I could post kind of sucked since now the thread is a bit off the rails and my comments were aimed at the original conversation going on.  Thanks a lot Mr. "I grow plants without light guy."  Regardless:

Re: pest overcoming resistance.  This happens with traditionally bred crops as well.  There is a nematode that I've been breeding resistance to for years.  The natural resistance I was using in my crosses came from some wild-type species.  We released a bunch of new varieties with resistance to the pest.  About 7-8 years later, we started to see these resistant plants with nematodes on them.  It was determined that these nematodes were different from the original ones and now we are breeding resistance to race 2 of the nematode.  Nature finds a way means job security for me.

Re: GMO.  Two things to consider.  Recently my boss went to Indonesia.  While there, he took a picture of some workers dusting seed with a highly toxic, systemic insecticide before planting (used to protect against a virus the insects vector).  No face masks, no gloves, no ventilation.  To say he was disturbed with this is an understatement.  We could very simply, make a GMO version that is resistant to the virus the insects spread, hence no longer the need for these workers to expose themselves to these conditions.  The hard part would be getting Indonesia to allow trials of these GMO's, since the Sierra Club (and I'm sure others) have spent millions in the far-East educating the general public of these countries that all GMO = bad.  Hence lots and lots of regulations.

Second, suppose instead of inserting new genes into an organism, we simply silence a gene that is already there and do nothing else.  An example: We know there is a gene, that codes for a cell wall protein, that allows a certain bacteria to transfer from cell to cell within the plant effectively allowing the disease to spread within the plant and kill it.  We have the ability to silence this one gene.  Should we?   There is already a new buzzword around this process:  "intra-genic modification"  I could make thousands of crosses in my greenhouse, and evaluate the millions of individuals resulting from those crosses and maybe find one someday that has naturally mututated to have a silenced version of this gene.  Or we could do it in about a week, with a very simple process.

However, after saying all this, last week we had a meeting with a R&D rep. from a company that specializes in the crops we work with.  He was going on and on about how they just developed some new "intra-genic" breeding lines that are resistant to a specific virus.  They spent millions on this and it's going to revolutionize the industry.  While they were spending their money and time in the lab, I was making crosses in the greenhouse and doing virus screens.  I identified some wild types that had a natural resistance to the same virus, did the crosses and now have some really good advanced breeding lines to look at.  He was not pleased that we basically beat them to the punch, and with traditional breeding methods at that.

/public potato breeder
// no more bashing potatoes
/// mashing still OK
 
2014-03-19 02:01:16 PM

Thom Joad: Wow!  Saw this thread yesterday and signed up for an account so I could chime in (been lurking around here for years).  Having to wait the 6 hours before I could post kind of sucked since now the thread is a bit off the rails and my comments were aimed at the original conversation going on.  Thanks a lot Mr. "I grow plants without light guy."  Regardless:

Re: pest overcoming resistance.  This happens with traditionally bred crops as well.  There is a nematode that I've been breeding resistance to for years.  The natural resistance I was using in my crosses came from some wild-type species.  We released a bunch of new varieties with resistance to the pest.  About 7-8 years later, we started to see these resistant plants with nematodes on them.  It was determined that these nematodes were different from the original ones and now we are breeding resistance to race 2 of the nematode.  Nature finds a way means job security for me.

Re: GMO.  Two things to consider.  Recently my boss went to Indonesia.  While there, he took a picture of some workers dusting seed with a highly toxic, systemic insecticide before planting (used to protect against a virus the insects vector).  No face masks, no gloves, no ventilation.  To say he was disturbed with this is an understatement.  We could very simply, make a GMO version that is resistant to the virus the insects spread, hence no longer the need for these workers to expose themselves to these conditions.  The hard part would be getting Indonesia to allow trials of these GMO's, since the Sierra Club (and I'm sure others) have spent millions in the far-East educating the general public of these countries that all GMO = bad.  Hence lots and lots of regulations.

Second, suppose instead of inserting new genes into an organism, we simply silence a gene that is already there and do nothing else.  An example: We know there is a gene, that codes for a cell wall protein, that allows a certain bacteria to transfer from cell to cell within t ...


Do you get to work with many of the South American cultivars?

What I wouldn't give to get some of those to play with.  Not breed, just to grow for fun.
 
2014-03-19 03:25:49 PM
I've grown and crossed with Papa Cacho, Papa Amarillo and Yema de Huevo

One of our varieties (Red Magic) is doing really well in S. America.  So well in fact that I just bought a new flatbed truck with some of the royalties.

The main problem with some of these S. American lines is season length.  A few years ago I grew ~ 800 clones from a cross with one of my own varieties and Papa Cacho.  After applying diquat 3 times to the plot and waiting 3 weeks, I was able to select maybe a dozen that actually had dead vines.  The rest of them were perfectly green, 3-5 feet tall and wanted to go for another 2-3 months.  Out of the dozen or so that I selected, 3 or 4 had very immature tubers that did not want to separate from the vines and another one had fingerling tubers the length of my arm.  Out of those original 800, I'm now left with 3 that seem to be adapted to the growing conditions around here.
 
2014-03-19 04:32:38 PM

Thom Joad: No face masks, no gloves, no ventilation. To say he was disturbed with this is an understatement. We could very simply, make a GMO version that is resistant to the virus the insects spread, hence no longer the need for these workers to expose themselves to these conditions.


Welcome to the conversation! You made some really good points, and I especially liked this one.

Thom Joad: While they were spending their money and time in the lab, I was making crosses in the greenhouse and doing virus screens. I identified some wild types that had a natural resistance to the same virus, did the crosses and now have some really good advanced breeding lines to look at. He was not pleased that we basically beat them to the punch, and with traditional breeding methods at that.


Sounds good. I hope it works out for you.

If you don't mind my asking, what kind of testing do you typically perform on the new breeding lines? There's a lot of debate about the GMO testing, and what is considered sufficient, but I have no idea what kind of testing is normal for plants developed using traditional breeding methods. Every new species can have unexpected outcomes, even ones produced using  hybridization.
 
2014-03-19 04:58:38 PM

Thom Joad: I've grown and crossed with Papa Cacho, Papa Amarillo and Yema de Huevo

One of our varieties (Red Magic) is doing really well in S. America.  So well in fact that I just bought a new flatbed truck with some of the royalties.

The main problem with some of these S. American lines is season length.  A few years ago I grew ~ 800 clones from a cross with one of my own varieties and Papa Cacho.  After applying diquat 3 times to the plot and waiting 3 weeks, I was able to select maybe a dozen that actually had dead vines.  The rest of them were perfectly green, 3-5 feet tall and wanted to go for another 2-3 months.  Out of the dozen or so that I selected, 3 or 4 had very immature tubers that did not want to separate from the vines and

another one had fingerling tubers the length of my arm.  Out of those original 800, I'm now left with 3 that seem to be adapted to the growing conditions around here.

I want that just for the novelty.
 
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