If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Contact Music)   Damon Lindelof explains 'Lost' finale: "Errr, no they weren't all dead. Uh, it was...spiritual? or something?"   (contactmusic.com) divider line 109
    More: Amusing, Damon Lindelof, series finale, Carlton Cuse, Lost S1E01, Writers Guild of America, errr  
•       •       •

2433 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 17 Mar 2014 at 12:29 PM (36 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



109 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-03-17 10:59:45 AM  
ANd subby uses Lindelof's name in the headline to piss farkers off even though there's not a single quote from Lindelof in the article.
 
2014-03-17 10:59:56 AM  
Dude, just admit you had no farking clue how to end it and threw some kludge together at the last minute.

It's the only way the healing can begin.
 
2014-03-17 11:45:13 AM  
If you finish off your long suffering show, and then you have to explain the ending of your show you have failed at TV writing.
 
2014-03-17 11:52:47 AM  
2.bp.blogspot.com


The ending sucked. Overall it was a great series with some great episodes. Walkabout and a few others were as good TV as we've had in a long time. If you're mad about whether or not they made it all up as they went or not, you should probably get away from the computer and TV for a little while. There's a whole wide world out there to experience. Of course, you might road rage on some old lady who didn't use her turn signal.... so maybe screaming at your TV is a better option
 
2014-03-17 12:33:08 PM  
I, for one, loved the last episode. Don't hate me, bro.
 
2014-03-17 12:37:43 PM  
Stunning how many people judge the show based on a single episode (and/or the conclusion). They gave us years of great television, and changed the way 1 hour serials are made. I loved this show, and great ending or not, it was a wonderful ride.
 
2014-03-17 12:39:24 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: If you finish off your long suffering show, and then you have to explain the ending of your show you have failed at TV writing.


They're not "explain[ing] the ending of [their] show."  They're pointing out that the footage of the wreckage at the end wasn't meant to be part of the show, it was just to provide a buffer between the ending of the show and the commercials.  But because people have to latch on to every little thing when it comes to television nowadays, some started saying that that spare footage meant that they were really dead all along.
 
2014-03-17 12:46:05 PM  
So, um....was there more to the article that I didn't see?  Because it doesn't really say much.
 
2014-03-17 12:49:26 PM  
I understand that the beach scene buffer may have confused people into briefly thinking they were 'dead the whole time', but it was so obvious as the last season ended that the flash sideways was the only purgatory type scenes. And even if the scene of the plane on the beach (which was only in the U.S. broadcasts) fooled you, how do you simply walk away from a show you invested so much time in without doing even two minutes research. "That sucked, I can't believe they were dead the whole time! Lame!" *spend two minutes on internet* "Oh, they weren't dead the whole time. Just half of season 6. ABC screwed up with the last shot. I get it now."
 
2014-03-17 12:49:56 PM  

cygnusx13: I, for one, loved the last episode. Don't hate me, bro.


I liked it, too.

There are shows that are about the plot, and shows that are about the characters and their development. I think Lost started off as the first, but then changed over to the second by the end. It was inconsistent, and that is what turned viewers off.
 
2014-03-17 12:50:22 PM  

Nuclear Monk: So, um....was there more to the article that I didn't see?  Because it doesn't really say much.


This. I mean, they sort of explained one minor aspect of the finale, but that was it.
 
2014-03-17 12:50:25 PM  
this guy is a great writer, up until the last 5 pages of any script.  Take it away then and then let someone with some brains finish it off.
 
2014-03-17 12:52:41 PM  
And they have a plan.  Oh wait, that was a completely different series that rode off a cliff at the end.
 
2014-03-17 12:56:39 PM  

You Are All Sheep: this guy is a great writer, up until the last 5 pages of any script.  Take it away then and then let someone with some brains finish it off.


So you're saying he should work with Stephen King?
 
2014-03-17 12:59:22 PM  

You Are All Sheep: this guy is a great writer, up until the last 5 pages of any script.  Take it away then and then let someone with some brains finish it off.


I'm impressed he was able to fit the last 75% of Prometheus on 5 pages.
 
2014-03-17 12:59:43 PM  
The show was awesome. The finale was awesome. Their being off the island was the hardest part for me to enjoy, but made me appreciate the ending even more.
 
2014-03-17 01:00:52 PM  
He should be locked in a room with the finale episode of Six Feet Under playing on repeat. That is how you end a show.
 
2014-03-17 01:02:07 PM  

Hebalo: Stunning how many people judge the show based on a single episode (and/or the conclusion). They gave us years of great television, and changed the way 1 hour serials are made. I loved this show, and great ending or not, it was a wonderful ride.


If you have a great 6 course meal but then find a used condom in the dessert you're probably not going to recommend the place to your friends or go back.

The finale of lost was the used condom in your Crème brûlée
 
2014-03-17 01:05:30 PM  
It was obvious from the start that the whole show was just being pulled piece by piece out of his ass.

Having the last laugh at the end when it became too obvious for even the fanboys to deny was almost too sweet.
 
2014-03-17 01:09:36 PM  
Yes, they were dead.
 
2014-03-17 01:10:34 PM  

Hebalo: Stunning how many people judge the show based on a single episode (and/or the conclusion). They gave us years of great television, and changed the way 1 hour serials are made. I loved this show, and great ending or not, it was a wonderful ride.


I raged about the ending of the new Battlestar Galactica for years, believing that it robbed the entire series of value, but recently I've started watching it from the beginning again and it has reminded me how great the rest of the show was.  I will still get mad when I finally get back to the ending again, but I'm now not that upset that I got the DVDs.
 
2014-03-17 01:13:14 PM  
How do people still not understand what happened? It was clearly explained in the finale. It was incredibly stupid and a sort of cop out, yes, but it was explained in a satisfactory manner.

The island story took place in reality and was brought to an end by the silliness with the magic hole on the island. The smoke monster, Jacob, the lighthouse, the statue, and the island were all real. (Further mysteries were explained by the epilogue video that explains what the Dharma Initiative was really up to.)

The flash sideways all took place in a purgatorial afterlife realm where every character from the show gathered to wait for the others after dying so they could move on to the next phase of the afterlife. Some characters died during the show, and others died much, much later. (Ben and Hurley, for example, presumably presided over the island for a long time as its guardians).  Whereas things went badly for the characters in reality, the afterlife realm allowed them to atone for their sins and move on when they awoke to the truth that this just like a dream during a long sleep. They then gathered in an ecumenical sanctuary and a guy named Christian Shepherd led them on to the next realm.

There was nothing tricky or difficult to understand about any of the above. The show explained all of it quite capably. What made the ending disappointing was that the sixth season was supposed to make sense out of all of these mysteries using a plausible, science-based explanation and instead opted for magic. The flash-sideways were also an incredible waste of time because they existed in a false realm where none of what had transpired in the show really mattered.
 
2014-03-17 01:17:14 PM  

Superjew: It was obvious from the start that the whole show was just being pulled piece by piece out of his ass.

Having the last laugh at the end when it became too obvious for even the fanboys to deny was almost too sweet.


I bailed on Twin Peaks after most of a season, realizing I was being farked with to no good end.  By the time Lost came around I was much older and wiser.  Didn't watch more than parts of an episode or two.  It seems I didn't miss anything at all.  :)

Ooooh, a monster, made of smoke, what does it all mean.  Oooga booga.  Man does this sound awful:

"Very early on we had decided that even though Lost is a show about people on the island, really, metaphorically, it was about people who were lost and searching for meaning and purpose in their lives. And because of that, we felt the ending really had to be spiritual, and one that talks about destiny," explained Cuse on the finale of the controversial show. "We would have long discourses about the nature of the show, for many years, and we  decided it needed to mean something to us and our belief system and the characters and how all of us are here to lift each other up in our lives."

/but I own a TV
 
2014-03-17 01:18:20 PM  

Carth: He should be locked in a room with the finale episode of Six Feet Under playing on repeat. That is how you end a show.


As much as I didn't hate the ending of LOST - I agree...between SFU and Breaking Bad - the bar has been set for 'Now THAT's how you do it!' when ending a great series.

I didn't hate the ending of LOST - It wasn't my dream scenario - but I loved the show so damned much they would have had to pull some 'Turning them all into lumberjacks' or 'Throwing them into a snowglobe' for me to have been raging over the finale.

As for the plane wreckage...I just assumed it was the last testament, so to speak, left of them on the island.  Never felt like it was a fake out.
 
2014-03-17 01:20:34 PM  
"Very early on we had decided that even though Lost is a show about people on the island, really, metaphorically, it was about people who were lost and searching for meaning and purpose in their lives. And because of that, we felt the ending really had to be spiritual, and one that talks about destiny," explained Cuse on the finale of the controversial show. "We would have long discourses about the nature of the show, for many years, and we decided it needed to mean something to us and our belief system and the characters and how all of us are here to lift each other up in our lives."

"Then we decided, fark that, magic cave."
 
2014-03-17 01:21:36 PM  
Lost was a great series. Kept us on our toes pretty much the entire time. The first three seasons are some of the best television ever. The season three finale might be one of the greatest television episodes of all time.

I'll never watch this show again though. Knowing how it ends puts a damper on re-watching it all over again. The last three seasons get worse and worse, and the payoff doesn't make up for it.

It's too bad, really.
 
2014-03-17 01:23:13 PM  
I don't know how much work Lindelof did on Prometheus, but I mostly enjoyed it and Lost.

But it still bugs me that the biologist who was scared off and decided to run back to the ship by a several thousand year old corpse of an alien would then be intrigued and try to touch a giant alien worm that was exhibiting defensive posturing similar to a cobra.

Or how the geologist who controlled the drones that mapped the alien ship got lost in that ship even though the design was a giant U and they were in contact with the ship before the storm hit.
 
2014-03-17 01:23:39 PM  
OK.
Now,  explain 'Lost'
 
2014-03-17 01:24:45 PM  
"Poochie went back to his home planet and died."

Lindeloffffffff  has ruined too many scripts now. Time to stop.
 
2014-03-17 01:28:09 PM  

secularsage: How do people still not understand what happened? It was clearly explained in the finale. It was incredibly stupid and a sort of cop out, yes, but it was explained in a satisfactory manner.

The island story took place in reality and was brought to an end by the silliness with the magic hole on the island. The smoke monster, Jacob, the lighthouse, the statue, and the island were all real. (Further mysteries were explained by the epilogue video that explains what the Dharma Initiative was really up to.)

The flash sideways all took place in a purgatorial afterlife realm where every character from the show gathered to wait for the others after dying so they could move on to the next phase of the afterlife. Some characters died during the show, and others died much, much later. (Ben and Hurley, for example, presumably presided over the island for a long time as its guardians).  Whereas things went badly for the characters in reality, the afterlife realm allowed them to atone for their sins and move on when they awoke to the truth that this just like a dream during a long sleep. They then gathered in an ecumenical sanctuary and a guy named Christian Shepherd led them on to the next realm.

There was nothing tricky or difficult to understand about any of the above. The show explained all of it quite capably. What made the ending disappointing was that the sixth season was supposed to make sense out of all of these mysteries using a plausible, science-based explanation and instead opted for magic. The flash-sideways were also an incredible waste of time because they existed in a false realm where none of what had transpired in the show really mattered.


Why do you ask a question and then answer yourself?  Do you just like to type?
 
2014-03-17 01:31:52 PM  

Superjew: It was obvious from the start that the whole show was just being pulled piece by piece out of his ass.

Having the last laugh at the end when it became too obvious for even the fanboys to deny was almost too sweet.


Gosh, you're so super cool. Must be awesome to have that power of foresight and not have to endure years of enjoying a TV show, even if it gets a little wonky at times. I'm sure at all of the parties you attend you're too big of a hit to even worry about that sort of thing though.

So super cool.
 
2014-03-17 01:32:31 PM  

Any Pie Left: "Poochie went back to his home planet and died."

Lindelof has ruined too many scripts now gotten the blame from butthurt fanboys too long now. Time to stop.


FIFY
 
2014-03-17 01:33:03 PM  

Enlightened Liberal: I don't know how much work Lindelof did on Prometheus, but I mostly enjoyed it and Lost.

But it still bugs me that the biologist who was scared off and decided to run back to the ship by a several thousand year old corpse of an alien would then be intrigued and try to touch a giant alien worm that was exhibiting defensive posturing similar to a cobra.

Or how the geologist who controlled the drones that mapped the alien ship got lost in that ship even though the design was a giant U and they were in contact with the ship before the storm hit.


Or how the lead male scientist was super depressed that he found a dead alien body instead of being unbelievably happy that they found a farking ALIEN body.

Or how the alien gestation shiat made absolutely no sense (goo goes on man, turned into zombie. Goo goes inside man, turns to zombie. Man goos inside woman, woman gets squid. Squid turns into giant squid, goos inside space jockey, space jockey gets wannabe xenomorph).

Or the reveal of Weyland (and his daughter) was totally stupid and pointless.

Prometheus was all sorts of farked up. And Lindelof had a major contribution to it.
 
2014-03-17 01:34:45 PM  

secularsage: How do people still not understand what happened? It was clearly explained in the finale. It was incredibly stupid and a sort of cop out, yes, but it was explained in a satisfactory manner.

The island story took place in reality and was brought to an end by the silliness with the magic hole on the island. The smoke monster, Jacob, the lighthouse, the statue, and the island were all real. (Further mysteries were explained by the epilogue video that explains what the Dharma Initiative was really up to.)

The flash sideways all took place in a purgatorial afterlife realm where every character from the show gathered to wait for the others after dying so they could move on to the next phase of the afterlife. Some characters died during the show, and others died much, much later. (Ben and Hurley, for example, presumably presided over the island for a long time as its guardians).  Whereas things went badly for the characters in reality, the afterlife realm allowed them to atone for their sins and move on when they awoke to the truth that this just like a dream during a long sleep. They then gathered in an ecumenical sanctuary and a guy named Christian Shepherd led them on to the next realm.

There was nothing tricky or difficult to understand about any of the above. The show explained all of it quite capably. What made the ending disappointing was that the sixth season was supposed to make sense out of all of these mysteries using a plausible, science-based explanation and instead opted for magic. The flash-sideways were also an incredible waste of time because they existed in a false realm where none of what had transpired in the show really mattered.


And I don't think there were a lot of people who didn't get it, they just thought it sucked.
 
2014-03-17 01:36:19 PM  

homarjr: Lost was a great series. Kept us on our toes pretty much the entire time. The first three seasons are some of the best television ever. The season three finale might be one of the greatest television episodes of all time.

I'll never watch this show again though. Knowing how it ends puts a damper on re-watching it all over again. The last three seasons get worse and worse, and the payoff doesn't make up for it.

It's too bad, really.


I have rewatched several times since the series ended.  Knowing the end had no effect on it....and actually - the rewatches helped me pick up on stuff I wouldn't have otherwise gained on the 'once a week' grind.

For instance:

- pretty convinced that Locke was Smokey's biatch from season 1.  There are distinct signs that Smokey took hold of him and was his puppet from then on.

- Between seasons 3 - 4, only about a half a day actually transpires on Island time...but Ben Linus sustained about an asskicking an episode for something like, three episodes in a row:  He should have been spoonfed and diapered when all was said and done given the amount of headblows he sustained.

- Echo began building the church...and I think they had a long game planned for Echo, to go along with the 'spiritual' ending.  Had the actor playing Echo not bailed on the series, I think the ending could have been crafted much moreso for a more easily palatable long game.  However, I don't think the writers really thought out what building Echo into the long game meant when he was no longer there - they set on an ending he factored into, then kept it up, even though he was gone.
 
2014-03-17 01:38:56 PM  
secularsage:   The flash sideways all took place in a purgatorial afterlife realm where every character from the show gathered to wait for the others after dying so they could move on to the next phase of the afterlife. Some characters died during the show, and others died much, much later. (Ben and Hurley, for example, presumably presided over the island for a long time as its guardians).  Whereas things went badly for the characters in reality, the afterlife realm allowed them to atone for their sins and move on when they awoke to the truth that this just like a dream during a long sleep. They then gathered in an ecumenical sanctuary and a guy named Christian Shepherd led them on to the next realm.

There was nothing tricky or difficult to understand about any of the above. The show explained all of it quite capably. What made the ending disappointing was that the sixth season was supposed to make sense out of all of these mysteries using a plausible, science-based explanation and instead opted for magic. The flash-sideways were also an incredible waste of time because they existed in a false realm where none of what had transpired in the show really mattered.



Please explain where the above was "explained quite capably".  It was implied vaguely, but there was no context in the show to actually assemble that without massive leaps by the audience.  You had to already be leaning that way, and interpret it through that lens initially for it to make sense.  The problem with Lost was that it was that it started quite coherently and linear, and became so scattered, parallel, and mystical by the end that both audiences watching it were turned off:

1)  Casual "mass watchers" lost interest because the show got too confusing and difficult to follow during the final two seasons.  They slowly faded out, and got zero payoff in the final season, because they were left with nothing they could mentally hold on to.

2)  The "plot winders" followed the show closely, and mentally ran at the speed the mid seasons asked of its audience.  It gave you a lot of twists, hints, and mysteries, dropping a few new ones each episode. The problem is that you're required to have a payoff at the end where it all comes together in a series of "oh, wow, that all makes sense" moments.  They didn't provide that.  They hand-waved, gave you a multiple-ending, multiple-interpretation final act, which is wholly unsatisfying to those who got up to their elbows in the plot.

Quite frankly, the end of Lost killed an entire generation of potentially good television because no one is willing to commit themselves to that type of show now.  Almost every attempt to be that ambitious since 2010 has failed, miserably.  Lost exemplifies the concept of a good idea executed so poorly that is considered a failure in retrospect.
 
2014-03-17 01:43:17 PM  
s3-ec.buzzfed.com
 
2014-03-17 01:45:50 PM  

BeatrixK: Carth: He should be locked in a room with the finale episode of Six Feet Under playing on repeat. That is how you end a show.

As much as I didn't hate the ending of LOST - I agree...between SFU and Breaking Bad - the bar has been set for 'Now THAT's how you do it!' when ending a great series.


Unless you give any credence to the theory that he died in the car he was trying to steal and all the redemption that happened after that was a dream.

http://www.uproxx.com/tv/2013/10/norm-mcdonald-breaking-bad/
 
2014-03-17 01:52:17 PM  

Khellendros: Quite frankly, the end of Lost killed an entire generation of potentially good television because no one is willing to commit themselves to that type of show now. Almost every attempt to be that ambitious since 2010 has failed, miserably. Lost exemplifies the concept of a good idea executed so poorly that is considered a failure in retrospect.


Exactly -- the Twin Peaks of its generation.
 
2014-03-17 01:53:19 PM  

Khellendros: secularsage:   The flash sideways all took place in a purgatorial afterlife realm where every character from the show gathered to wait for the others after dying so they could move on to the next phase of the afterlife. Some characters died during the show, and others died much, much later. (Ben and Hurley, for example, presumably presided over the island for a long time as its guardians).  Whereas things went badly for the characters in reality, the afterlife realm allowed them to atone for their sins and move on when they awoke to the truth that this just like a dream during a long sleep. They then gathered in an ecumenical sanctuary and a guy named Christian Shepherd led them on to the next realm.

There was nothing tricky or difficult to understand about any of the above. The show explained all of it quite capably. What made the ending disappointing was that the sixth season was supposed to make sense out of all of these mysteries using a plausible, science-based explanation and instead opted for magic. The flash-sideways were also an incredible waste of time because they existed in a false realm where none of what had transpired in the show really mattered.


Please explain where the above was "explained quite capably".  It was implied vaguely, but there was no context in the show to actually assemble that without massive leaps by the audience.  You had to already be leaning that way, and interpret it through that lens initially for it to make sense.  The problem with Lost was that it was that it started quite coherently and linear, and became so scattered, parallel, and mystical by the end that both audiences watching it were turned off:

1)  Casual "mass watchers" lost interest because the show got too confusing and difficult to follow during the final two seasons.  They slowly faded out, and got zero payoff in the final season, because they were left with nothing they could mentally hold on to.

2)  The "plot winders" followed the show closely, and mentally ran at the speed the mid seasons asked of its audience.  It gave you a lot of twists, hints, and mysteries, dropping a few new ones each episode. The problem is that you're required to have a payoff at the end where it all comes together in a series of "oh, wow, that all makes sense" moments.  They didn't provide that.  They hand-waved, gave you a multiple-ending, multiple-interpretation final act, which is wholly unsatisfying to those who got up to their elbows in the plot.

Quite frankly, the end of Lost killed an entire generation of potentially good television because no one is willing to commit themselves to that type of show now.  Almost every attempt to be that ambitious since 2010 has failed, miserably.  Lost exemplifies the concept of a good idea executed so poorly that is considered a failure in retrospect.


Garbage. If anything, Lost ushered in an era of taking chances on hour long serials. You confuse fan rage with ratings. Lost had great ratings for most of its run.

I'd argue that without Lost, shows like Game of Thrones, Walking Dead and Breaking Bad might not have happened.

"Killed an entire generation of potentially good television"? You're living in the farking Golden Age of Television. Be grateful.
 
2014-03-17 01:53:27 PM  

secularsage: How do people still not understand what happened? It was clearly explained in the finale. It was incredibly stupid and a sort of cop out, yes, but it was explained in a satisfactory manner.


What I really don't get is that people couldn't figure our the polar bears on their own -- that it was such a big unanswered question that they shot an easter egg explaining it for the DVDs.
 
2014-03-17 01:54:29 PM  
Did Walt have psychic powers?
How the hell was the smoke monster created?
What the hell was the smoke monster?
What was the purpose of the island?
Who the fark installed a giant wooden wheel that controlled the island?
Why did they install a giant wooden wheel that controlled the island?
What the hell did the wooden wheel do?
Was Sawyer's list of nicknames for other people infinite?

Just a few of the frustrating questions they never answered.
 
2014-03-17 01:57:34 PM  

Khellendros: Please explain where the above was "explained quite capably".


CHRISTIAN: Everyone dies sometime, kiddo. Some of them before you, some...long after you.
JACK: But why are they all here now?
CHRISTIAN: Well there is no "now" here.
JACK: Where are we, dad?
CHRISTIAN: This is the place that you...that you all made together, so that you could find one another. The most...important part of your life, was the time that you spent with these people. That's why all of you are here. Nobody does it alone Jack. You needed all of them, and they needed you.
JACK: For what?
CHRISTIAN: To remember...and to...let go.
JACK: Kate...she said we were leaving.
CHRISTIAN: Not leaving, no. Moving on.
JACK: Where are we going?
CHRISTIAN: [smiling] Let's go find out.

In other words, everybody dies sometime, but it's hard to accept that, so you all created a place where you could find each other and move on together.
 
kab
2014-03-17 02:02:57 PM  
My take on it:

The show started as trying to be a plot driven mystery about the island itself.  Fan reaction to this skyrocketed, so the writers decided to continue catering to this crowd.   They slowly realized that they were digging a hole that they couldn't get themselves out of, and switched to 'but.. but character development' mode.

Still, it was, at times, a brilliant show, and that isn't forgotten even if the wrap up should be.
 
2014-03-17 02:03:33 PM  

AntonChigger: Did Walt have psychic powers?
How the hell was the smoke monster created?
What the hell was the smoke monster?
What was the purpose of the island?
Who the fark installed a giant wooden wheel that controlled the island?
Why did they install a giant wooden wheel that controlled the island?
What the hell did the wooden wheel do?
Was Sawyer's list of nicknames for other people infinite?

Just a few of the frustrating questions they never answered.


Yes, Walt was special.
Man in Black went into the light
The Man in Black
The Island didn't have a purpose, it was just a special place that needed to be protected
The villagers that the Man in Black lived with installed the wheel
They installed the wheel in the hopes of getting off the island
The wheel mixed the water and light, and it worked to control the island to some degree
Yes

I won't argue that a lot of answers that Lost provided weren't pretty far from what I would have liked to have, but they were there none the less.  I would have loved a more sci-fi than spiritual ending, but people need to stop confusing "I didn't like the answers" with "the show didn't provide answers".
 
2014-03-17 02:03:37 PM  
Well that explained absolutely nothing.
 
2014-03-17 02:05:35 PM  
Keywork99: There are shows that are about the plot, and shows that are about the characters and their development. I think Lost started off as the first, but then changed over to the second by the end. It was inconsistent, and that is what turned viewers off.

I was one of the dorks who bought in to the show from the amazing first 15 minutes or so of Ep. 0101. I was one of those dorks that would spend hours researching the Casimir Effect and Egyptian hieroglyphs, spent hours on boards and blogs discussing the show, stayed with it until Jack finally closed his eyes > LOST, I was one of those people.

My disappointment with the show is very simple: they had a great premise, based on a group of people crashing on an island that had been a scientific research project gone horribly wrong and the stuff those people go through. I always assumed the Island was a form of purgatory --as a kid who grew up on Air Force bases, I knew what the outcome of a horrible plane crash would be-- that was always less interesting to me than other parts of the show.

By seasons 5 & 6 they had bought their own hype and were convinced that what people *really* cared about was who was Kate going to choose, Jack or Sawyer, that most fans were all about Penny & Desmond etc. No, no, no, no, no, no, no. People stuck around because they wanted to know about the polar bears and the numbers and so on. By seasons 5 & 6, they were just ignoring stuff that was canon: the numbers were the Valenzetti equation but all of a sudden the stupid Jacob storyline has them as numbers on a wheel being used to pick The Chosen Ones.

They wanted it both ways: to have obsessive fans that would play the games they set up when the show wasn't on and follow the confusing The Lost Experience online thing, people that would decode all the stuff they threw in there, but when people started pointing out inconsistencies and flat-out retconning, Lindeloff and Cuse got all huffy and ticked off that anyone was daring to question them.

Plus, some of the payoffs were lame: Ben was a pathological liar? That's it? They literally killed off the best character (John Locke) and tossed his corpse aside just so.......Jacob and his brother could play out their boring story? The power source of the Island is a crude penis-in-to-pussy visual?

Oh yeah, feel it Jack, FEEL IT!!!

www.lost-answers.com

What I hated most about the last 15 minutes of the finale was that it had these people who when they were "alive" had little use for each other, such as Jack and John or Jack and Charlie or Jack and Sawyer (see the trend here?) suddenly showing up in a glowing church for some gag-inducing Jack lovefest. The biggest idiot of all the characters, a character they were thinking of killing off in the fourth episode, the man who continually lead the group in to disaster after disaster, Jack gets the hot babe in the end AND gets a glowing farewell? Huh?

/Love Cuse's show Bates Motel
 
2014-03-17 02:05:42 PM  
Khellendros: Quite frankly, the end of Lost killed an entire generation of potentially good television because no one is willing to commit themselves to that type of show now.  Almost every attempt to be that ambitious since 2010 has failed, miserably.  Lost exemplifies the concept of a good idea executed so poorly that is considered a failure in retrospect.

I think the state of the TV industry is more to do with that now. A show will not last on networks unless dumbed down significantly. Say what you want about Lost but they didn't bow to the casual. They said, screw it, we're giving you time travel, and alternate reality(as the sideways was first presented), magic glowing caves, and frozen donkey wheel teleportation.

Lost is more like a terrible idea gone horribly right. A smoke monster on network TV? They fired the guy who green lit the project. The first season was unbelievably good. The season three finale had the greatest WTF ending in all of TV. After that point they had to get down to finish the show and there was no way to please everyone.

People praise the end of Breaking Bad, but even though it was great it was kind of an easy ending. Lost could have gone that way. The last episode could have been the one and only daring final escape from the island, but let's credit Lost for at least trying something different and not making leaving the island the point of the whole show.
 
2014-03-17 02:06:13 PM  

kab: My take on it:

The show started as trying to be a plot driven mystery about the island itself.  Fan reaction to this skyrocketed, so the writers decided to continue catering to this crowd.   They slowly realized that they were digging a hole that they couldn't get themselves out of, and switched to 'but.. but character development' mode.

Still, it was, at times, a brilliant show, and that isn't forgotten even if the wrap up should be.


It was pretty clear that they were focused on the characters from the start. Half of each episode was about individual characters dealing with daddy issues or drugs.
 
2014-03-17 02:06:58 PM  

Hebalo: I'd argue that without Lost, shows like Game of Thrones, Walking Dead and Breaking Bad might not have happened.


That's a rather extraordinary supposition.  I see no reason to buy into it.

"Killed an entire generation of potentially good television"? You're living in the farking Golden Age of Television. Be grateful.

That's true enough, but thankfully the dreck like Lost seems to be behind us.  Until the next ooh-spooky-I-have-a-secret bullshart show comes down the pike.  People rightfully make fun of M. Night Whatever for this kind of crap; why do these guys get a pass?

rugman11: In other words, everybody dies sometime, but it's hard to accept that, so you all created a place where you could find each other and move on together.


So it was a church then, an episodic version of The 700 Club or Tammy Faye Bakker or the Crystal Cathedral.  Thanks for summarizing exactly why the show is repulsive as written.  GOD DID IT!
 
Displayed 50 of 109 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report