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(Salon)   Because of no negative results in its involvement in the pet food industry, along with the extreme commitment to cleanliness and public health by Chinese industry; the FDA has approved the sale of Chinese processed American chicken in the U.S   (salon.com) divider line 48
    More: Scary, U.S., FDA, Chinese, Americans, chicken farming, dog foods, chickens, Disease Control  
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2014-03-17 08:37:34 AM  
we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.
 
2014-03-17 08:53:32 AM  
Their bodies are mechanically separated through a processed called "Advanced Meat Recovery," stripping the meat off leftover bones and turning it into the poultry version of pink slime.

You know, people point to this as if it's really a bad thing, but I consider mechanical separation machines and processes a modern marvel of engineering. Back in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when mechanical meat separators weren't really available, a lot of the less desirable body parts of animals (pork shoulders, notoriously) were largely waste products because there was no economical way to efficiently recover the meat from them. With the advent of the mechanical separation process, we are way better at recovery meat that would've otherwise gone to waste or thrown away.

SPAM was invented because Hormel executives were looking for a way to use newly recovered pork shoulder meat from new mechanical separators which were previously unavailable and were previously wasted.


Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.


Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?

http://freakonomics.com/2011/12/09/the-economics-of-chicken-feet-and -o ther-parts/
 
2014-03-17 08:53:38 AM  

Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.


No, but it will let them get around the rules for importing Chinese chickens into the US.  They all look the same with their feathers off, you know.
 
2014-03-17 08:55:59 AM  

RexTalionis: Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?


I would wager that we're already sending the feet to China.  Meat producers throw nothing away unless forced to do so, and will sell each part off to the best markets already.
 
2014-03-17 08:57:38 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: RexTalionis: Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?

I would wager that we're already sending the feet to China.  Meat producers throw nothing away unless forced to do so, and will sell each part off to the best markets already.


Uh, yes, that's what the link I posted said said...
 
2014-03-17 08:59:10 AM  

RexTalionis: Marcus Aurelius: RexTalionis: Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?

I would wager that we're already sending the feet to China.  Meat producers throw nothing away unless forced to do so, and will sell each part off to the best markets already.

Uh, yes, that's what the link I posted said said...


I ignored your link.  I'm more concerned about where I'll be getting my protein sources in the future.  This whole deal smells worse than a rotting chicken.
 
2014-03-17 09:47:20 AM  

Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.


True story- We got our dog from a breeder in Brooklyn. Besides breeding Spanish water dogs the guy also sold feathers for furniture stuffing. He used to process the feathers here in the US. It is now more economical for him to purchase the feathers from the US farmers, have them shipped to China and cleaned, then ship them back to the US.
 
2014-03-17 10:06:37 AM  
media.salon.com

SOON

 
2014-03-17 10:09:23 AM  

Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.


You'd be wrong.  International shipping is very, very cheap these days.  Well, for people who dont pay retail, anyhow.
 
2014-03-17 10:11:44 AM  
Fark you, FDA.  This is just plain wrong.
 
2014-03-17 10:12:31 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: RexTalionis: Marcus Aurelius: RexTalionis: Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?

I would wager that we're already sending the feet to China.  Meat producers throw nothing away unless forced to do so, and will sell each part off to the best markets already.

Uh, yes, that's what the link I posted said said...

I ignored your link.  I'm more concerned about where I'll be getting my protein sources in the future.  This whole deal smells worse than a rotting chicken.


My biggest concern is the intentional obfuscation of the information for the consumer.

American raised chicken shipped to China for processing can be labeled as "American Chicken" with no mention of ever having been in China, or having been in-transit on a ship for weeks.

I have no problem with allowing it to happen, but there is no argument for fighting the labeling that I am satisfied by.
 
2014-03-17 10:13:07 AM  
 
2014-03-17 10:14:50 AM  
Chineese chicken?  Have a drumstick....

/not obscure..
 
2014-03-17 10:15:37 AM  
i44.tinypic.com
 
2014-03-17 10:16:31 AM  
You would have thought after kids toys being painted with lead that the borders would have been closed to chinese goods. With a big fat go fark yourself note attached to the bill.

I geuss chinese dollars are worth more than american lives.

in days gone by a mass poisoning of the youth of a nation would have been taken as an act of war.
 
2014-03-17 10:16:56 AM  
Another tick on the list of uncountable times I've been grateful that the taste and texture of meat are repugnant to me...

/not being smug, really. It's a flavor thing over principle
//don't be hatin'; more meat for you!
 
2014-03-17 10:21:17 AM  

RexTalionis: You know, people point to this as if it's really a bad thing, but I consider mechanical separation machines and processes a modern marvel of engineering. Back in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when mechanical meat separators weren't really available, a lot of the less desirable body parts of animals (pork shoulders, notoriously) were largely waste products because there was no economical way to efficiently recover the meat from them. With the advent of the mechanical separation process, we are way better at recovery meat that would've otherwise gone to waste or thrown away.


On the fiip side of that, mechanized animal processing was inferior to manual processing until major improvements were made, making previously useful animal parts into industrial waste, as the food system became more industrialized. When the machines caught up to what people could do previously (they didn't really), the messy byproduct that was successfully harvested was packaged for sale at the low end of the food system. Hooray for industrial food processing!
 
2014-03-17 10:21:21 AM  
you hear that and it makes you want to choke something!
 
2014-03-17 10:22:09 AM  

teenage mutant ninja rapist: I geuss chinese dollars are worth more than american lives.

This has little to do with Chinese dollars. Americans are the ones who buy American chicken. And money being more important than lives is pretty much the status quo at this point when it comes to American business.
 
2014-03-17 10:24:39 AM  
Mmmm, bonus melamine...

And of course any Chinese Chicken that comes in has to be labeled, right?  right?
 
2014-03-17 10:30:53 AM  
The Usda recently enacted new COOL labeling for meat/seafood sold in the U.S. Whereas we used to label packages as "product of x" only, we now label them "born/hatched and raised in x. Processed in y" or similar.
However, value-added (i.e. processed/prepared)product requires no such labeling distinction to be made. You are often lucky to know where it was prepared let alone slaughtered.
 
2014-03-17 10:32:03 AM  
First, if there is one thing that a country should not outsource, it's their food supply. Selling food to each other is one thing. Letting another country process it and resell it to you...fark that.

Second, I doubt we will be buying Chinese chicken breasts in our supermarket's meat section. They will probably be processed into chicken nuggets and other chicken like things that can't be easily identifiable. Even then, who know what kind of crap they'll spray on it so it will survive the shipping.
 
2014-03-17 10:35:56 AM  

misanthropologist: RexTalionis: You know, people point to this as if it's really a bad thing, but I consider mechanical separation machines and processes a modern marvel of engineering. Back in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when mechanical meat separators weren't really available, a lot of the less desirable body parts of animals (pork shoulders, notoriously) were largely waste products because there was no economical way to efficiently recover the meat from them. With the advent of the mechanical separation process, we are way better at recovery meat that would've otherwise gone to waste or thrown away.

On the fiip side of that, mechanized animal processing was inferior to manual processing until major improvements were made, making previously useful animal parts into industrial waste, as the food system became more industrialized. When the machines caught up to what people could do previously (they didn't really), the messy byproduct that was successfully harvested was packaged for sale at the low end of the food system. Hooray for industrial food processing!


Personally I'm glad that we use as much of every animal we kill for food as is possible.  Failing to use nutritionally or industrially valuable material in an animal that you have killed is unethical.
 
2014-03-17 10:43:32 AM  
Solution: Eat less (or no) processed chicken.

The birds are miserable, they are full of antibiotics, and its bad for the environment.

Modern industrial chicken industries are horrible.
 
2014-03-17 10:45:57 AM  
Simple solution: don't eat processed chicken product.
 
2014-03-17 10:46:07 AM  
Pretty sure this is already done with fish, especially wild caught salmon in Alaska.
 
2014-03-17 10:49:14 AM  
 And so begins me not eating chicken unless I raise and kill it myself.
 
2014-03-17 10:50:22 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: RexTalionis: Marcus Aurelius: RexTalionis: Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?

I would wager that we're already sending the feet to China.  Meat producers throw nothing away unless forced to do so, and will sell each part off to the best markets already.

Uh, yes, that's what the link I posted said said...

I ignored your link.  I'm more concerned about where I'll be getting my protein sources in the future.  This whole deal smells worse than a rotting chicken.


I live in Ohio, and I'm about to start raising chickens for eggs and butchering.  You can buy my birds.  :)
 
2014-03-17 10:50:44 AM  
I'm never eating processed chicken McNuggets, patties, or any of that crap ever again.  Wouldn't trust Chinese food unless I was going to die without it.
 
2014-03-17 10:51:47 AM  

Egoy3k: misanthropologist: RexTalionis: You know, people point to this as if it's really a bad thing, but I consider mechanical separation machines and processes a modern marvel of engineering. Back in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when mechanical meat separators weren't really available, a lot of the less desirable body parts of animals (pork shoulders, notoriously) were largely waste products because there was no economical way to efficiently recover the meat from them. With the advent of the mechanical separation process, we are way better at recovery meat that would've otherwise gone to waste or thrown away.

On the fiip side of that, mechanized animal processing was inferior to manual processing until major improvements were made, making previously useful animal parts into industrial waste, as the food system became more industrialized. When the machines caught up to what people could do previously (they didn't really), the messy byproduct that was successfully harvested was packaged for sale at the low end of the food system. Hooray for industrial food processing!

Personally I'm glad that we use as much of every animal we kill for food as is possible.  Failing to use nutritionally or industrially valuable material in an animal that you have killed is unethical.


Not sure who you're responding to, but I agree. I was trying to make the point that the "waste products" that couldn't be efficiently harvested in 19th and early 20th century mechanical processing weren't waste products until the introduction of mechanical processing - they became "waste" because of technological and political-economic obstacles to their harvest. One might argue that the wasteful loss of useful meat and animal parts coupled with the marginalization of butchers made early industrial meat packing doubly unethical. But it certainly was profitable.
 
2014-03-17 10:54:46 AM  

santadog: You can buy my birds. :)


Nothing is quite as tasty as a locally raised free range chicken.
 
2014-03-17 10:56:20 AM  

vernonFL: Solution: Eat less (or no) processed chicken.

The birds are miserable, they are full of antibiotics, and its bad for the environment.

Modern industrial chicken industries are horrible.


^ This.  The industry is already horrible.  And now it's going to get worse.
 
2014-03-17 10:57:44 AM  

misanthropologist: Not sure who you're responding to, but I agree. I was trying to make the point that the "waste products" that couldn't be efficiently harvested in 19th and early 20th century mechanical processing weren't waste products until the introduction of mechanical processing - they became "waste" because of technological and political-economic obstacles to their harvest. One might argue that the wasteful loss of useful meat and animal parts coupled with the marginalization of butchers made early industrial meat packing doubly unethical. But it certainly was profitable.


Unfortunately, with the growth in population and how food is grown and transported around the country (especially around the end of the 19th and first 2 or 3 decades of the 20th century), I simply don't think it was viable to have fresh butchers available to serve every population.

Yes, maybe manual recovery is cleaner and more capable of recovering meat, but that means that for a large percentage of the population, meat would either be priced out of their diet or would be simply unavailable.
 
2014-03-17 10:58:57 AM  

misanthropologist: Egoy3k: misanthropologist: RexTalionis: You know, people point to this as if it's really a bad thing, but I consider mechanical separation machines and processes a modern marvel of engineering. Back in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when mechanical meat separators weren't really available, a lot of the less desirable body parts of animals (pork shoulders, notoriously) were largely waste products because there was no economical way to efficiently recover the meat from them. With the advent of the mechanical separation process, we are way better at recovery meat that would've otherwise gone to waste or thrown away.

On the fiip side of that, mechanized animal processing was inferior to manual processing until major improvements were made, making previously useful animal parts into industrial waste, as the food system became more industrialized. When the machines caught up to what people could do previously (they didn't really), the messy byproduct that was successfully harvested was packaged for sale at the low end of the food system. Hooray for industrial food processing!

Personally I'm glad that we use as much of every animal we kill for food as is possible.  Failing to use nutritionally or industrially valuable material in an animal that you have killed is unethical.

Not sure who you're responding to, but I agree. I was trying to make the point that the "waste products" that couldn't be efficiently harvested in 19th and early 20th century mechanical processing weren't waste products until the introduction of mechanical processing - they became "waste" because of technological and political-economic obstacles to their harvest. One might argue that the wasteful loss of useful meat and animal parts coupled with the marginalization of butchers made early industrial meat packing doubly unethical. But it certainly was profitable.


I'm somewhat confused by your point here.  Even today, in a modern meat packing plant humans are the ones holding the knives.  The mechanical separation comes from that the humans are trimming away.
 
2014-03-17 11:02:14 AM  
So much for 'fresh' chicken. Killed in the US....ship via boat to China (probably frozen), thawed to a certain degree, processed, frozen again and then shipped via ship back to the US for packaging and then distributed throughout various stores. Buy the time this chicken hits supermarket shelves it will already be over 3+ weeks old.

/Pork...the other white meat....
 
2014-03-17 11:04:40 AM  
How about a link to the article that doesn't feed clickwhores?

http://www.salon.com/2013/09/16/chicken_is_killing_the_planet/

Also, suck it meat-eaters.
 
2014-03-17 11:05:55 AM  

Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.


Wait until minimum wage gets raised and see what else gets offshored.
 
2014-03-17 11:06:47 AM  

Whatthefark: First, if there is one thing that a country should not outsource, it's their food supply. Selling food to each other is one thing. Letting another country process it and resell it to you...fark that.

Second, I doubt we will be buying Chinese chicken breasts in our supermarket's meat section. They will probably be processed into chicken nuggets and other chicken like things that can't be easily identifiable. Even then, who know what kind of crap they'll spray on it so it will survive the shipping.


I agree totally.  It is adding basically an unregulated step in the processing of food for the American market, by an entity which does not have a very good reputation in maintaining high standards for consumer safety.  To add insult to injury, it's more money siphoned out of the U.S. economy at the expense of American jobs.  But on the bright side they will be able to buy more chicken nuggets at Walmart with the money saved by the companies involved.  Just kidding, you know any money saved will not be passed on to the consumer.
 
2014-03-17 11:07:15 AM  

Alonjar: Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.

You'd be wrong.  International shipping is very, very cheap these days.  Well, for people who dont pay retail, anyhow.


I'm guessing the US to China trip is fairly cheap. The ships have to make the trip regardless, so fark it, fill them with chickens.

/Just a guess that the ships are generally not full, I have no idea how much the export/import ratio is.
 
2014-03-17 11:12:46 AM  

ferretman: So much for 'fresh' chicken. Killed in the US....ship via boat to China (probably frozen), thawed to a certain degree, processed, frozen again and then shipped via ship back to the US for packaging and then distributed throughout various stores. Buy the time this chicken hits supermarket shelves it will already be over 3+ weeks old.

/Pork...the other white meat....


... owned by the Chinese:  http://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/chinese-get-ok-buy-amer i can-pork-producer-f4B11243408
 
2014-03-17 11:14:03 AM  

RexTalionis: Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?


Pfft.  My local ShopRite sells chicken feet.  Branchburg, NJ - not exactly a big Asian community.

Noticeably F.A.T.: I'm guessing the US to China trip is fairly cheap. The ships have to make the trip regardless, so fark it, fill them with chickens.


Yeah, considering how much crap we import from China.  We can't fill all the empty ships with discarded electronics for them to recycle for us...
 
2014-03-17 11:14:56 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: I'm more concerned about where I'll be getting my protein sources in the future.


24.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-03-17 11:15:20 AM  
Fark that shiat.
 
2014-03-17 11:17:12 AM  

Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.

heavymetal: Whatthefark: First, if there is one thing that a country should not outsource, it's their food supply. Selling food to each other is one thing. Letting another country process it and resell it to you...fark that.

Second, I doubt we will be buying Chinese chicken breasts in our supermarket's meat section. They will probably be processed into chicken nuggets and other chicken like things that can't be easily identifiable. Even then, who know what kind of crap they'll spray on it so it will survive the shipping.

I agree totally.  It is adding basically an unregulated step in the processing of food for the American market, by an entity which does not have a very good reputation in maintaining high standards for consumer safety.  To add insult to injury, it's more money siphoned out of the U.S. economy at the expense of American jobs.  But on the bright side they will be able to buy more chicken nuggets at Walmart with the money saved by the companies involved.  Just kidding, you know any money saved will not be passed on to the consumer.



That's just anti corporate warrgarbbl not borne out by any facts. Huge savings have been passed on to the consumer as food production was industrialized and centralized. In 1913 12 eggs cost $8.73 in 2013 money. Today Walmart sells them for $1.90. [http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cavemen-ate-12-burgers-a-historical-p er spective-on-food-prices/#axzz2wEWYdanE ]
 
2014-03-17 11:35:11 AM  

RexTalionis: Their bodies are mechanically separated through a processed called "Advanced Meat Recovery," stripping the meat off leftover bones and turning it into the poultry version of pink slime.

You know, people point to this as if it's really a bad thing, but I consider mechanical separation machines and processes a modern marvel of engineering. Back in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when mechanical meat separators weren't really available, a lot of the less desirable body parts of animals (pork shoulders, notoriously) were largely waste products because there was no economical way to efficiently recover the meat from them. With the advent of the mechanical separation process, we are way better at recovery meat that would've otherwise gone to waste or thrown away.

SPAM was invented because Hormel executives were looking for a way to use newly recovered pork shoulder meat from new mechanical separators which were previously unavailable and were previously wasted.


Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.

Did you know that the most profitable parts of the chicken is the feet, which is basically only sold to China?

http://freakonomics.com/2011/12/09/the-economics-of-chicken-feet-and -o ther-parts/


Alton Brown claims to have served them to his daughter and her friends when they requested chicken fingers.

"Chickens don't have fingers!"
 
2014-03-17 11:37:48 AM  

amoral: Hobodeluxe: we're shipping chickens to China to have them processed and they send them back to us to eat?  There's no way they can save money like that.
heavymetal: Whatthefark: First, if there is one thing that a country should not outsource, it's their food supply. Selling food to each other is one thing. Letting another country process it and resell it to you...fark that.

Second, I doubt we will be buying Chinese chicken breasts in our supermarket's meat section. They will probably be processed into chicken nuggets and other chicken like things that can't be easily identifiable. Even then, who know what kind of crap they'll spray on it so it will survive the shipping.

I agree totally.  It is adding basically an unregulated step in the processing of food for the American market, by an entity which does not have a very good reputation in maintaining high standards for consumer safety.  To add insult to injury, it's more money siphoned out of the U.S. economy at the expense of American jobs.  But on the bright side they will be able to buy more chicken nuggets at Walmart with the money saved by the companies involved.  Just kidding, you know any money saved will not be passed on to the consumer.


That's just anti corporate warrgarbbl not borne out by any facts. Huge savings have been passed on to the consumer as food production was industrialized and centralized. In 1913 12 eggs cost $8.73 in 2013 money. Today Walmart sells them for $1.90. [http://www.marksdailyapple.com/cavemen-ate-12-burgers-a-historical-p er spective-on-food-prices/#axzz2wEWYdanE ]


My point has nothing to do with being anti-corporate or anti-centralized towards food production; and your argument towards something I did not argue against is just a red herring.

My argument is that this:
1. Puts an aspect of consumer food production out of the control of the FDA and American food processing standards, and into the hands of food processors who in general do not have a good reputation for consumer safety and will not have any monitoring to adhere to U.S. food safety standards.

2. Takes money out of the U.S. economy at the expense of the American worker, and any money saved will not be seen in lower prices to the consumer.  Nor will any of the money saved go to better wages to the poultry workers who did not have their jobs outsourced.  It will be a financial gain for a few at the expense of many.
 
2014-03-17 11:53:31 AM  
Looks like the Chinese have threatened Fark....a 'Green' thread gets turned 'Red'.
 
2014-03-17 11:57:40 AM  

ferretman: Looks like the Chinese have threatened Fark....a 'Green' thread gets turned 'Red'.


This thread is a duplicate. It got redlit because there's another article about this.
 
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