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(Rocketnews 24)   Fark food thread: Japan introduces the Pizza Burger (meat patty, fried egg, veg, bacon bits, fried onion, cheese sprinkles, and demi-glace sauce on top of a traditional focaccia pizza base) - What's your favorite weird international cuisine?   (en.rocketnews24.com) divider line 81
    More: Weird, Pizza Burger, Japan, Matsu, drizzles  
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8085 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Mar 2014 at 10:09 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-16 12:10:17 AM  
img.fark.net

I am both intrigued and nauseated at the thought of eating that concoction, but I strangely want to try it.
 
2014-03-16 12:20:22 AM  
Subby, that's not the pizza burger:

www.foodiggity.com

This is.
 
2014-03-16 01:16:29 AM  
for91days.com

Silkworm Larva- a common Korean bar snack...sort of like pretzels. They are surprisingly good with beer, if you can forget about what you are crunching on.
 
2014-03-16 10:16:55 AM  
Leberkaese in a bulkie roll with spicy mustard
 
2014-03-16 10:18:20 AM  
I swear it read "titty sprinkles" the first time.

/would eat anything at a sushi bar
 
2014-03-16 10:18:52 AM  
The next time our Japanese consultant comes back from Japan he is going to bring me some Japanese kit kats.  They make some awesomely crazy favors.  Green tea, soy sauce, strawberry cheesecake, creme brûlée etc.  He spoke to my daughters 2nd grade class about Japan's culture and brought those crackheads tons of snacks from japan.  I've never seen such a mixed reaction.  It varied from OMG this the greatest thing ever to "I'm about to puke"...

I've gotta tip my hand to Japan.  They take weird to another level.
 
2014-03-16 10:21:11 AM  
There's a guy in a nearby town of Canmore, Alberta that does almost the same thing in the headline. His whole shop specializes in focaccia bread.

http://www.bellacrusta.com/

Really good.

BUT.

If you are in Canmore, Alberta, there is a place called La Belle Patate https://www.facebook.com/LaBellePatate

It's on the north side of the highway unlike everything else, tucked away in the industrial area, but I'll be damned if they don't have the most authentic poutine in the province. Hell even the Montral Smoked Meat sandwhiches are superb. Cannot recommend this place enough. Last two times I've gone the owner sat us, Quebecois accent and all, and you can tell that he cares about his business and customers.
 
2014-03-16 10:23:14 AM  
Maybe not that obscure, but I sure miss Walker's Prawn crisps in England. (shrimp flavoured chips.)  Our salt and vinegar varieties are similar, but yet, not the same!
 
2014-03-16 10:23:27 AM  
Japanese pizza is just weird. It's just weird, and you can blame MacArthur and his transitional period for it, because folks were trying to find something for Americans to eat while they were kicking back on their downtime, and then the locals got into it, and it just got strange.

When I was at Christopher's in Phoenix--now Crush--we did a foie gras pizza. Hand tossed dough, foie gras and shallots, and actually pretty simple. And if you like foie gras, fair tasty. While I was at Mesa Verde, when we were on our own and sort of bored, we'd do Buffalo quail. Grill the quail, and then toss with a good, old fashioned Buffalo sauce, and two or three birds would generally get you through. I liked to do the same with our prickly pear jam which was damn spicy. While I was with the Northampton Brewery, I did a Four Alarm Penne, that was a habanero based sauce, with tomato and scallion and a bit of one of our lighter selections depending on the season--essentially an Arrabbiata on steriods, and with a Caribbean kick.

These are less "weird international cuisine" than just twists on traditional dishes, and what we tend to think of as "weird" when done elsewhere...think of how traditional Chinese feel about coming here and looking at what we call "Chinese food." What passes for a Jerk in the States would make a lot of my friends in Kingston weed, and not from joy. Let's not even go into what people do to Polish or Italian cuisine over here.
 
2014-03-16 10:23:35 AM  
Burgerpizzas are old news. I'm sure I wasn't the only student of limited culinary skills, but boundless enthusiasm, to try throwing everything he had into one meal. Get tomato puree and spread it on the burger buns, throw in cheese, two or three burgers, more cheese, bacon, eggs, chicken, literally anything that would go. Which means no onions. What kind of madman puts onions on a pizza? A very mad madman, that's who.

I got fat.
 
2014-03-16 10:24:18 AM  
Pizza? That sounds more like a "let's see what kinda stuff I have left in the fridge" burger.
I guess it's just quicker to say.
 
2014-03-16 10:25:06 AM  
Don't know about weird, but the Hot Chili Crab and Banana Leaf Fish Curry in Singapore was heavenly.  Made me cry with every bite. Ice Cold Tiger Beer made it perfect. (several).
 
2014-03-16 10:25:26 AM  

MaxSupernova: The next time our Japanese consultant comes back from Japan he is going to bring me some Japanese kit kats.  They make some awesomely crazy favors.  Green tea, soy sauce, strawberry cheesecake, creme brûlée etc.  He spoke to my daughters 2nd grade class about Japan's culture and brought those crackheads tons of snacks from japan.  I've never seen such a mixed reaction.  It varied from OMG this the greatest thing ever to "I'm about to puke"...

I've gotta tip my hand to Japan.  They take weird to another level.


Green Tea Kit-Kats are like crack to me.

A lot of bar food in Japan right now has some less common cuts/meats making a comeback. Chicken liver, tripe, etc. are regaining popularity. It's actually really good. Then again, any time you grill things yourself, it adds fun.

They also have pancake/waffle shops that are trendy for dessert (it's not generally a breakfast thing). All kinds of toppings... good stuff.
 
2014-03-16 10:28:24 AM  

hubiestubert: Japanese pizza is just weird.


Yes and no. You can get exactly what you'd get here in the states (even from Pizza Hut or Dominos, if you'd like). Corn is a frequent addition, and (especially roasted) corn on pizza is freaking awesome.

There is a bigger selection of seafood pizza there just because seafood is more common/cheap.

I've only seen the mayo-on-pizza thing once, and the mayo is different than ours in flavor/texture.

Every market has things for local tastes. McDonald's in India has some different choices, for instance.
 
2014-03-16 10:30:47 AM  
Since when is focaccia a traditional pizza base?
 
2014-03-16 10:32:48 AM  
Pizza burger? I think the word you are looking for is okonomiyaki.

/hold the mayo
 
2014-03-16 10:33:22 AM  
Last Fall, I had kangaroo meat in a Chinese restaurant in Essen, Germany.  Y'know, some of that Australian-Chinese-German fusion cuisine :)
 
2014-03-16 10:33:57 AM  
Tete de veau.

All the meat & connective tissue on an entire veal head, peeled off and flattened.  It's interesting to work your way around the ears.
 
2014-03-16 10:36:07 AM  
In before balut.....
 
2014-03-16 10:36:13 AM  

angstycoder: hubiestubert: Japanese pizza is just weird.

Yes and no. You can get exactly what you'd get here in the states (even from Pizza Hut or Dominos, if you'd like). Corn is a frequent addition, and (especially roasted) corn on pizza is freaking awesome.

There is a bigger selection of seafood pizza there just because seafood is more common/cheap.

I've only seen the mayo-on-pizza thing once, and the mayo is different than ours in flavor/texture.

Every market has things for local tastes. McDonald's in India has some different choices, for instance.


Then again, what we call pizza is weird when the Italians come over, and ask WTF did you DO to that poor foccacia?  Taking someone born in Naples out for Chicago style pizza was an exercise in in-credulousness. We twist up cuisine just as well as any other people. Same woman I took for pizza went through my cabinets and found a can of Spaghetti-Os and she just shook her head.
 
2014-03-16 10:36:20 AM  
i14.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-16 10:36:43 AM  
Okinomiyaki (hope I spelled that right)...
Or is that the thing you do with eggs?
 
2014-03-16 10:38:37 AM  
i18.photobucket.com

/Don't ask what I use to stir it.
 
2014-03-16 10:38:45 AM  
Not really weird or foreign, but I'm partial to the Doner Kebap and Lahmacun, that you find in the little street side shops in Germany.  Just hold the Tzatziki.

Unfortunately I don't know of anywhere in my entire state that serves them.
 
2014-03-16 10:40:09 AM  
If I stick with Japan and what people might consider weird, I'd go for もんじゃ焼き (monjayaki).  It's a Kantou regional dish similar to お好み焼き (okonomiyaki) but more liquid-y. I had several different kinds, but mochi and cheese was really good. All gooey and chewy... yum.
 
2014-03-16 10:40:12 AM  

anfrind: Since when is focaccia a traditional pizza base?


Since traditional Italian flat breads were used as the base for pizzas in the beginning. Doughs have shifted and changed over the years, and hewing from the original thought process to top a piece of flat bread with some tomatoes, herbs, and cheese, and heat it up fair quick. Did you think that pizza was just born out of nothing?
 
2014-03-16 10:40:54 AM  
www.trippyfood.com

Haggis is delicious. Deep-fried haggis is the best drunk food ever invented.
 
2014-03-16 10:44:56 AM  

hubiestubert: anfrind: Since when is focaccia a traditional pizza base?

Since traditional Italian flat breads were used as the base for pizzas in the beginning. Doughs have shifted and changed over the years, and hewing from the original thought process to top a piece of flat bread with some tomatoes, herbs, and cheese, and heat it up fair quick. Did you think that pizza was just born out of nothing?


What surprised me was, when I went to Italy in the late 90s, that pizza had such regional variation.
Rome was superthin, no visible edge crust.

Florence had stands with very thick, doughy, almost deep-dish-height crust rectangles a couple inches long served cold.

There were more I can't remember this far down the line. I did try to get a bite of pizza from the cities we visited.
 
2014-03-16 10:45:31 AM  

USAF Retired: [i14.photobucket.com image 800x599]


I'd lick the plate clean!
 
2014-03-16 10:49:12 AM  
Horse shiat and honey ! An old Brazilian delicacy .
 
2014-03-16 10:49:47 AM  

angstycoder: hubiestubert: anfrind: Since when is focaccia a traditional pizza base?

Since traditional Italian flat breads were used as the base for pizzas in the beginning. Doughs have shifted and changed over the years, and hewing from the original thought process to top a piece of flat bread with some tomatoes, herbs, and cheese, and heat it up fair quick. Did you think that pizza was just born out of nothing?

What surprised me was, when I went to Italy in the late 90s, that pizza had such regional variation.
Rome was superthin, no visible edge crust.

Florence had stands with very thick, doughy, almost deep-dish-height crust rectangles a couple inches long served cold.

There were more I can't remember this far down the line. I did try to get a bite of pizza from the cities we visited.


Pizza varies from region to region in the States and in Italy, and it's stylistic variations are kinda fantastic to behold. Sort of like the variations with just plain hot dogs here in the States--or sausages in Germany. Don't even get me started on all the fantastic things that the Italians do with cured meats, because those bastiches have been practicing for a long ass while, and luckily, they've shared what they do with the world.
 
2014-03-16 10:50:52 AM  

hubiestubert: anfrind: Since when is focaccia a traditional pizza base?

Since traditional Italian flat breads were used as the base for pizzas in the beginning. Doughs have shifted and changed over the years, and hewing from the original thought process to top a piece of flat bread with some tomatoes, herbs, and cheese, and heat it up fair quick. Did you think that pizza was just born out of nothing?


I haven't really studied the history of focaccia, but since the stuff I find in the store labeled as focaccia is typically a flatbread topped with oil and a thin layer of sauce, I had assumed that it was more likely either a precursor to pizza, or it shared a common culinary ancestor.  Making pizza out of focaccia, therefore, sounds kind of like making pizza out of another pizza.

Hmm...if the wikis are to be believed, the key difference between focaccia and pizza is the amount of leavening.  And I suppose for a "pizza burger", a dough with more leavening would make more sense, so it would be more like focaccia.
 
2014-03-16 10:50:54 AM  

Coniuratos: [www.trippyfood.com image 768x576]

Haggis is delicious. Deep-fried haggis is the best drunk food ever invented.


What you said!
 
2014-03-16 10:51:48 AM  
Not really foreign, but Katsu Burgers are awesome.
http://www.katsuburger.com/

/the nori fries are great too.
 
2014-03-16 10:59:55 AM  

anfrind: hubiestubert: anfrind: Since when is focaccia a traditional pizza base?

Since traditional Italian flat breads were used as the base for pizzas in the beginning. Doughs have shifted and changed over the years, and hewing from the original thought process to top a piece of flat bread with some tomatoes, herbs, and cheese, and heat it up fair quick. Did you think that pizza was just born out of nothing?

I haven't really studied the history of focaccia, but since the stuff I find in the store labeled as focaccia is typically a flatbread topped with oil and a thin layer of sauce, I had assumed that it was more likely either a precursor to pizza, or it shared a common culinary ancestor.  Making pizza out of focaccia, therefore, sounds kind of like making pizza out of another pizza.

Hmm...if the wikis are to be believed, the key difference between focaccia and pizza is the amount of leavening.  And I suppose for a "pizza burger", a dough with more leavening would make more sense, so it would be more like focaccia.


I like to do a bit of a compromise with mine. I like to do a dough that stretches fairly well, but not too thin, so that it can be dusted with a bit of flour and grilled. Par off a dozen or two doughs, and hand them over to the guy in front of the oven, and let him go to town. We did something similar at Christopher's, though we'd stretch the doughs and toss them on the grill to order--and the same dough that we used for our pizzas, were also cut slightly smaller for the rolls at the table. As soon as a table came in, the guy on grill, who was also on the wood fired oven, would cut off the requisite number of rolls, toss them in the oven, and then fish them out piping hot and fresh baked. I'm less a fan of pre-stretched doughs, because the longer they sit, the consistency suffers. I'd rather toss and grill, or stretch doughs to order. The latter is always a crowd pleaser for an open kitchen, but it does make for better texture, not to mention a space saver for storage between shifts.
 
2014-03-16 11:13:31 AM  
I'llbe having Korean birthday soup today - miyeok guk. Prized for the vitamin content, it is also given to mother's following birth. It's made with water, wakame (a type of seaweed), fish sauce, sesame oil, garlic, and sometimes beef brisket or seafood. I'll be using mussles. (Seafood for a Pisces lol).

/loves tradition
//doesn't matter whose
///not Korean
 
2014-03-16 11:15:42 AM  

hubiestubert: anfrind: hubiestubert: anfrind: Since when is focaccia a traditional pizza base?

Since traditional Italian flat breads were used as the base for pizzas in the beginning. Doughs have shifted and changed over the years, and hewing from the original thought process to top a piece of flat bread with some tomatoes, herbs, and cheese, and heat it up fair quick. Did you think that pizza was just born out of nothing?

I haven't really studied the history of focaccia, but since the stuff I find in the store labeled as focaccia is typically a flatbread topped with oil and a thin layer of sauce, I had assumed that it was more likely either a precursor to pizza, or it shared a common culinary ancestor.  Making pizza out of focaccia, therefore, sounds kind of like making pizza out of another pizza.

Hmm...if the wikis are to be believed, the key difference between focaccia and pizza is the amount of leavening.  And I suppose for a "pizza burger", a dough with more leavening would make more sense, so it would be more like focaccia.

I like to do a bit of a compromise with mine. I like to do a dough that stretches fairly well, but not too thin, so that it can be dusted with a bit of flour and grilled. Par off a dozen or two doughs, and hand them over to the guy in front of the oven, and let him go to town. We did something similar at Christopher's, though we'd stretch the doughs and toss them on the grill to order--and the same dough that we used for our pizzas, were also cut slightly smaller for the rolls at the table. As soon as a table came in, the guy on grill, who was also on the wood fired oven, would cut off the requisite number of rolls, toss them in the oven, and then fish them out piping hot and fresh baked. I'm less a fan of pre-stretched doughs, because the longer they sit, the consistency suffers. I'd rather toss and grill, or stretch doughs to order. The latter is always a crowd pleaser for an open kitchen, but it does make for better texture, not to mention a space saver for storage between shifts.


Would you give us a pizza dough recipe? I've never really loved any I've tried.
 
2014-03-16 11:28:19 AM  
Here is an Italian dish:
4 Oranges sliced with all of the peel removed, 1 raw red onion sliced very thin and the rings spread over the orange slices. Salt and pepper to taste, scatter fresh oregano leaves over it with some black olives (use good olives not those canned abominations). Then pour 1/4 cup olive oil over all of it.
 
2014-03-16 11:36:00 AM  

USAF Retired: [i14.photobucket.com image 800x599]


As erotic as that is, I'd never be able to eat food off of some strange naked lady. I guess I have too many morals, I'd keep wanting to ask her if she's okay or offer her a towel or something.

/damn this constant desire to treat all people like equals... Except that guy over there in the corner masturbating furiously, he's icky.
 
2014-03-16 11:36:06 AM  
Snake soup in Vietnam. The snake tastes like fish. But the bones are like where you would expect a snake's bones to be. And of course the soup part is Vietdelicious too.
 
2014-03-16 11:41:01 AM  

Kinetic King: Last Fall, I had kangaroo meat in a Chinese restaurant in Essen, Germany.  Y'know, some of that Australian-Chinese-German fusion cuisine :)


They fooled you again. it was probably some Austrian game mammal but they called it Australian.
 
2014-03-16 11:44:14 AM  
I like bitter melon and daikon, and cook with them sometimes.

A good steak tartare is amazing.
 
2014-03-16 11:53:05 AM  

strangeluck: USAF Retired: [i14.photobucket.com image 800x599]

As erotic as that is, I'd never be able to eat food off of some strange naked lady. I guess I have too many morals, I'd keep wanting to ask her if she's okay or offer her a towel or something.

/damn this constant desire to treat all people like equals... Except that guy over there in the corner masturbating furiously, he's icky.


I think I'd be constantly worrying about how uncomfortable it must be for her to lie perfectly motionless with all sorts of sticky foodstuffs on top of her.
 
2014-03-16 12:01:10 PM  
So did anyone else get "pizza burgers" in grade school in the 80's?  Picture a thicker than average fast food patty but with a pocket inside with mozzarella and pizza sauce filling. It had to be something that was factory-made. That's what I think of whenever someone say's "pizza burger".
   
My school was small, rural and Midwestern. At that time we still had two older women cooking everything for probably 200 kids every weekday.  Mostly it was canned vegetables and processed meats with things like tater-tots and rice pudding thrown too. It wasn't great food, but it was filling and reasonably palatable for a bunch of farm kids.
 
2014-03-16 12:04:38 PM  
Fish balls on the streets of Manila.  I love the spicy vinegar.  I lived on these things during high school..
www.pepper.ph
 
2014-03-16 12:22:49 PM  
lindalouwho: Would you give us a pizza dough recipe? I've never really loved any I've tried.

For at home pizza:

4 C bread flour+another 1/8 cup for punching down later.
1 1/2 C warm water
2 t salt
1/2 t dry yeast
1 C olive oil+ a bit more for the bowl later.
1/2 t basil
1/2 t thyme

Activate yeast with warm water, and let stand 10-20 minutes. Until bubbling.

Mix flour, salt, and your dry herbs--or chopped wet if you'd rather, though go three times as much for fresh herbs to dry.  When your yeast and water are bubbling and doing their thing, slowly mix your flour mixture and add in your olive oil until smooth. You can add a teaspoon of sugar to the blend to feed your yeast more, but I'm not a fan myself. That's up to you. Once the dough is mixed--consistently pulls evenly from the sides of the bowl, smooth, and is springy and firm to the touch, set it aside with a damp cloth over and ignore it or an hour--you can transfer it out, and place in an oiled boil somewhere warm for a faster rise. After rising once, punch it down, and fold--yes, you should use a dough hook for this process--with a bit more olive oil--enough to dampen the bowl--and a sifting of flour. Again, let it rise. Like a Maya Angelou poem. About an hour or so. Punch it down again, following a teensy bit more olive oil in the bowl, and a dusting of flour over the top. You want a firm yet stretchy consistency. Yes, you should use a dough hook for the folding process. Punched down and now compliant, you can use a dough knife to cut your dough to the desired size, stretch not too thinly, and dust with a bit dry flour to prevent it sticking, and grill lightly on one side, then the other. Set it aside, and top as you will. Or store as a mass, and refrigerate, and then cut to order. I prefer to cut dough immediately, and then store, but then again, I want to lay my hands on product that is immediately useful. Your demands may not be so exacting.

You can vary the recipe up a bit, by adding in a dry cheese like Parm or Romano if you'd like--no more than a few tablespoons--but do so only at the last stage. Be aware that adding cheese to a grilled dough will make it weep a bit when you grill, which can lead to scorching, so be careful.

You can use this process for a looser pizza dough, but if you do so, add in your salt towards the last fold. Salt helps form chains and stiffens your dough. For a grilled dough, you want a stiffer dough, so adding it in early helps the process. If you want stretched dough that you can toss and fiddle with, you want to add it in later.
 
2014-03-16 12:48:37 PM  
We eat a lot of horse here in Sicily.  I concur that the orange salad is fantastic, but I prefer it with blood oranges and spring onions.  Monkey on a stick is pretty good.
 
2014-03-16 12:54:11 PM  
My favorite weird international cuisine? Eggs boiled in the urine of pre-pubescent boys, a traditional delicacy from Dongyang, China, served from street kiosks in springtime.

inventorspot.com

/They collect the pee from area elementary schools.
//No I haven't tried it, would you??
///hot
 
2014-03-16 12:57:30 PM  

hubiestubert: lindalouwho: Would you give us a pizza dough recipe? I've never really loved any I've tried.

For at home pizza:

4 C bread flour+another 1/8 cup for punching down later.
1 1/2 C warm water
2 t salt
1/2 t dry yeast
1 C olive oil+ a bit more for the bowl later.
1/2 t basil
1/2 t thyme

Activate yeast with warm water, and let stand 10-20 minutes. Until bubbling.

Mix flour, salt, and your dry herbs--or chopped wet if you'd rather, though go three times as much for fresh herbs to dry.  When your yeast and water are bubbling and doing their thing, slowly mix your flour mixture and add in your olive oil until smooth. You can add a teaspoon of sugar to the blend to feed your yeast more, but I'm not a fan myself. That's up to you. Once the dough is mixed--consistently pulls evenly from the sides of the bowl, smooth, and is springy and firm to the touch, set it aside with a damp cloth over and ignore it or an hour--you can transfer it out, and place in an oiled boil somewhere warm for a faster rise. After rising once, punch it down, and fold--yes, you should use a dough hook for this process--with a bit more olive oil--enough to dampen the bowl--and a sifting of flour. Again, let it rise. Like a Maya Angelou poem. About an hour or so. Punch it down again, following a teensy bit more olive oil in the bowl, and a dusting of flour over the top. You want a firm yet stretchy consistency. Yes, you should use a dough hook for the folding process. Punched down and now compliant, you can use a dough knife to cut your dough to the desired size, stretch not too thinly, and dust with a bit dry flour to prevent it sticking, and grill lightly on one side, then the other. Set it aside, and top as you will. Or store as a mass, and refrigerate, and then cut to order. I prefer to cut dough immediately, and then store, but then again, I want to lay my hands on product that is immediately useful. Your demands may not be so exacting.

You can vary the recipe up a bit, by adding in a dry cheese like Parm or Romano if you'd like--no more than a few tablespoons--but do so only at the last stage. Be aware that adding cheese to a grilled dough will make it weep a bit when you grill, which can lead to scorching, so be careful.

You can use this process for a looser pizza dough, but if you do so, add in your salt towards the last fold. Salt helps form chains and stiffens your dough. For a grilled dough, you want a stiffer dough, so adding it in early helps the process. If you want stretched dough that you can toss and fiddle with, you want to add it in later.


Thank you! I cook but don't have much patience for doughs, pie crusts, and the like.
Long ago when I made my first pie crust (or tried to, I should say) I only had frozen butter on hand. Not knowing you can't do this, I melted the butter lol I could have added flour all day and wouldn't have had pie crust dough!

/csb
 
2014-03-16 01:00:50 PM  

mr_a: [for91days.com image 630x420]

Silkworm Larva- a common Korean bar snack...sort of like pretzels. They are surprisingly good with beer, if you can forget about what you are crunching on.


www.edadrian.com

You lie.  I was tricked into eating beondaegi once.  They are evil incarnate.  The smell alone will make you vomit your brains out, or at least wish you could.
 
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