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(Network World)   28 more facts about pi to add to the 3.14 million you already don't know   (networkworld.com) divider line 27
    More: Scary, Gene Cernan, decimals  
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3773 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Mar 2014 at 12:04 PM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-14 11:41:25 AM  
29) the formula "pi r squared" is actually used to compute the surface area of round pies, not square ones.
 
2014-03-14 12:20:40 PM  
I'm confused by the use of the scary tag
 
2014-03-14 12:21:56 PM  
Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.

π there, you are no guilty of intellectual property theft, possession of classified information, and possession of child pornography. Please report to your nearest prison.
 
2014-03-14 12:29:03 PM  

bigheadface: I'm confused by the use of the scary tag


Maybe subby is scared of math?
 
2014-03-14 12:29:53 PM  
-Many movies have been made about pi, including "Pi: Faith in Chaos," which is about a man who goes mad trying to rationalize pi.*

Freakin' Pythagoreans.
 
2014-03-14 12:31:39 PM  

syrynxx: 29) the formula "pi r squared" is actually used to compute the surface area of round pies, not square ones.


Yes, you have to use the formula "cornbread r squared"
 
2014-03-14 12:39:17 PM  

Ned Stark: Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.

π there, you are no guilty of intellectual property theft, possession of classified information, and possession of child pornography. Please report to your nearest prison.


Someone actually made a pi-based filesystem for Linux. Rather than storing the actual data on disk, it only stores the file's length and earliest position in the digits of pi. This saves a hell of a lot of space on disk, at the cost of some "minor performance problems."

/ogre-nerds.jpg
 
2014-03-14 12:50:22 PM  

Ned Stark: Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.


Not all "infinite non repeating," i.e. irrational, numbers include every finite sequence of digits.  For example, 1.H1^H001.... is irrational - there's not a repeating pattern, but it misses a lot of strings of digits.  Pi may or may not include all sequences of digits - it hasn't been proven either way.
 
2014-03-14 12:51:35 PM  

Lattices aren't Distributive: Ned Stark: Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.

Not all "infinite non repeating," i.e. irrational, numbers include every finite sequence of digits.  For example, 1.H1^H001.... is irrational - there's not a repeating pattern, but it misses a lot of strings of digits.  Pi may or may not include all sequences of digits - it hasn't been proven either way.


html ate my number - it should be 1.H1^H001.... (the string of 0s between 1s gets longer each time.)
 
2014-03-14 12:52:33 PM  

Lattices aren't Distributive: Lattices aren't Distributive: Ned Stark: Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.

Not all "infinite non repeating," i.e. irrational, numbers include every finite sequence of digits.  For example, 1.H1^H001.... is irrational - there's not a repeating pattern, but it misses a lot of strings of digits.  Pi may or may not include all sequences of digits - it hasn't been proven either way.

html ate my number - it should be 1.H1^H001.... (the string of 0s between 1s gets longer each time.)


it did it again.
1.H1^H0010000 ...
 
2014-03-14 12:53:16 PM  

Lattices aren't Distributive: Lattices aren't Distributive: Lattices aren't Distributive: Ned Stark: Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.

Not all "infinite non repeating," i.e. irrational, numbers include every finite sequence of digits.  For example, 1.H1^H001.... is irrational - there's not a repeating pattern, but it misses a lot of strings of digits.  Pi may or may not include all sequences of digits - it hasn't been proven either way.

html ate my number - it should be 1.H1^H001.... (the string of 0s between 1s gets longer each time.)

it did it again.
1.H1^H0010000 ...


for fark's sake. it shows up correct in preview.
1. 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
 
2014-03-14 01:03:50 PM  

Lattices aren't Distributive: Ned Stark: Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.

Not all "infinite non repeating," i.e. irrational, numbers include every finite sequence of digits.  For example, 1.H1^H001.... is irrational - there's not a repeating pattern, but it misses a lot of strings of digits.  Pi may or may not include all sequences of digits - it hasn't been proven either way.


You don't necessarily need to prove that it contains all possible sequences of digits of any length. For example, if you can demonstrate that it contains every possible sequence from 0 through 255, then you could build every possible file from a list of bytes.

That's how the current implementation of that pi-based filesystem I was talking about works, "to maximize performance." I'm fairly sure that this particular implementation doesn't actually wind up saving any disk space, despite my claims above. But if you were willing to accept the above "minor performance problems", which even the current implementation still has, you could do it.
 
2014-03-14 01:26:39 PM  

Lattices aren't Distributive: Lattices aren't Distributive: Lattices aren't Distributive: Lattices aren't Distributive: Ned Stark: Being an infinite non repeating number, pi contains all computer programs, documents, songs, pictures, and any other digital data that could possibly exist.

Not all "infinite non repeating," i.e. irrational, numbers include every finite sequence of digits.  For example, 1.H1^H001.... is irrational - there's not a repeating pattern, but it misses a lot of strings of digits.  Pi may or may not include all sequences of digits - it hasn't been proven either way.

html ate my number - it should be 1.H1^H001.... (the string of 0s between 1s gets longer each time.)

it did it again.
1.H1^H0010000 ...

for fark's sake. it shows up correct in preview.
1. 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1


Apparently, Fark hates math
 
2014-03-14 01:31:01 PM  
sin(pi/4) = sqrt(1/2)
 
2014-03-14 02:00:48 PM  
I am not very good at math, but I'm utterly fascinated when someone can describe it well. Pi is one of my favorite movies ever, even though I'm sure it took liberties with the math.
 
2014-03-14 03:09:39 PM  
i always preferred 22/7
 
2014-03-14 03:29:44 PM  
Every additional decimal point you find of pi makes it become a larger number, but pi as a concept is always the same number. But pi as a concept is infinitely long, so it's always infinitely larger than what we think. (???)
 
2014-03-14 03:37:57 PM  

Foxxinnia: Every additional decimal point you find of pi makes it become a larger number, but pi as a concept is always the same number. But pi as a concept is infinitely long, so it's always infinitely larger than what we think. (???)


Uh... trolling or actually not clear on this point? Pi is always exactly the same value, and actually there are formulas for calculating any digit of it, so it always remains constant. There's nothing we have left to "discover".  We don't "think" it's 3.1416, we just use that as a good-enough approximation. What you said is like telling someone that as you open a door to a house, the house you're entering gets bigger because you're seeing more of it.
 
2014-03-14 03:46:47 PM  

Millennium: Someone actually made a pi-based filesystem for Linux. Rather than storing the actual data on disk, it only stores the file's length and earliest position in the digits of pi. This saves a hell of a lot of space on disk, at the cost of some "minor performance problems."


Damn that's nerdy. I like it.
 
2014-03-14 04:02:30 PM  

lectos: syrynxx: 29) the formula "pi r squared" is actually used to compute the surface area of round pies, not square ones.

Yes, you have to use the formula "cornbread r squared"


www.mdpub.com

quantum bread is the exception
 
2014-03-14 04:02:48 PM  
Back in the days of punch card computing, a colleague of mine modified another guy's Fortran program, substituting spaces for part of the pi constant. He stuck in a comment: "I stole a piece of pi".

/csb from the Dark Ages of computing
 
2014-03-14 05:19:13 PM  

Arkanaut: Foxxinnia: Every additional decimal point you find of pi makes it become a larger number, but pi as a concept is always the same number. But pi as a concept is infinitely long, so it's always infinitely larger than what we think. (???)

Uh... trolling or actually not clear on this point? Pi is always exactly the same value, and actually there are formulas for calculating any digit of it, so it always remains constant. There's nothing we have left to "discover".  We don't "think" it's 3.1416, we just use that as a good-enough approximation. What you said is like telling someone that as you open a door to a house, the house you're entering gets bigger because you're seeing more of it.


I think what he's saying is that 3.14 is less than 3.141, so that every time you add a digit it gets slightly bigger.  It's one of those things where you don't even know where to start...convergent series or just plain "this is how you round".
 
2014-03-14 05:31:26 PM  

Millennium: Rather than storing the actual data on disk, it only stores the file's length and earliest position in the digits of pi. This saves a hell of a lot of space on disk, at the cost of some "minor performance problems."


Not really.  Let's suppose for the moment that pi is actually "normal" in base-2: that is contains all finite strings at the "expected" frequency.  Roughly speaking: the bit sequence of pi is 'random'.

Now, consider an arbitrary string (or 'file') of length N bits.  As there are 2^N strings of this length, we would expect to find this arbitrary string inside pi after around 2^N binary places.  Some length-N strings would, of course, appear before, and others after.  But on average we would expect to wait 2^N bits.

So when the encoding of a string is (N, p), where p is the position of the string inside pi, we would expect p to be of size 2^N on average.  Such a number takes N bits to store (in our pi-filesystem).  But the file itself is N bits long, so we haven't saved any space.

It is impossible to come up with a compression scheme that can compress *all* files.  This is easy to see.  There are 2^N binary strings of length N, but only 2^N -1 strings of length less than N.
 
2014-03-14 05:34:12 PM  

StrangeQ: Arkanaut: Foxxinnia: Every additional decimal point you find of pi makes it become a larger number, but pi as a concept is always the same number. But pi as a concept is infinitely long, so it's always infinitely larger than what we think. (???)

Uh... trolling or actually not clear on this point? Pi is always exactly the same value, and actually there are formulas for calculating any digit of it, so it always remains constant. There's nothing we have left to "discover".  We don't "think" it's 3.1416, we just use that as a good-enough approximation. What you said is like telling someone that as you open a door to a house, the house you're entering gets bigger because you're seeing more of it.

I think what he's saying is that 3.14 is less than 3.141, so that every time you add a digit it gets slightly bigger.  It's one of those things where you don't even know where to start...convergent series or just plain "this is how you round".


I took it as he was talking about the number of digits.
 
2014-03-14 05:35:01 PM  
Please define "ordinary font" k'thanksbye.
 
2014-03-14 09:40:57 PM  
Sweet and gentle sensitive man
With an obsessive nature and deep fascination
For numbers
And a complete infatuation with the calculation
Of PI
 
2014-03-14 11:23:28 PM  
Since March 14th is during the school year, my (now) wife and I decided on July 22nd to get married.

Same thing, only different!

/Our shower curtain has the first 10,000 digits of pi.
//I have 100 or so digits memorized.
I can't have 3.14 or so slashies to put here...
 
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