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(The Federalist)   I've got a blog where I can say anything, checkmate science   (thefederalist.com ) divider line
    More: Dumbass, Giordano Bruno, global warming, first to invent, Brannon Braga, greenhouse effect, other things being equal, acid rain, pseudosciences  
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4182 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Mar 2014 at 12:35 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-14 09:22:16 PM  
Those of us who don't want tax-and-handout politics, don't want idiots who can't understand the science they're trying to dispute, but also think gold bugs are mentally ill, really need a new political party. There's no home for us in any non-lunatic group.
 
2014-03-14 09:23:55 PM  
And he missed the one thing that drives every astronomer I know up the wall - the density of objects in the asteroid belt.  It's nothing like Star Wars- it's a huge pile of empty with a couple of rocks strewn around.
 
2014-03-14 09:24:13 PM  
Subby...you're an a$$hole for making me click on that link. What a douche...the author that is.
 
2014-03-14 09:47:27 PM  

Son of Thunder: Now I know why this case sounds so familiar. Replace "Copernicus' theory" with "quantum mechanics", and I might be at least a bit sympathetic to the idea of burning Deepak Chopra at the stake.


Oh, man, that's a honeydew of a melon-scratcher right there.
 
2014-03-14 10:03:13 PM  

TheOmni: I think the biggest red flag in his first part (assuming you weren't already familiar with how the greenhouse effect is involved with Venus) is how he never explains what the greenhouse effect is, what it means, how it works, or anything like that. He has no actual substance in that section. I kind of agree that the Giordano Bruno portion of Cosmos was a bit overstated, but not a crazy big deal, and of course there shouldn't be sound in space. But the sound in space section of this article seems to be thrown in so that it could have one thing correct to try and lend credence to the rest of his absurd ramblings. And I don't even know where to begin on that last part. Does he not know how metaphors work?


Yes, i just red the tampon thread. Very fitting
 
2014-03-14 10:06:10 PM  
Son of Thunder:

And now Cosmos is not a science show? Wow. And here I thought there was a limit to the desperate spinning I'd see from the Bruno Booster Brigade. Silly me.

I'm sorry if I implied that you are defending the people who killed Bruno. I disagree with you though, the story should be told, it involves the suppression free thought and inquisitiveness, and that's a part of what the show is trying to explain.
 
2014-03-14 10:19:42 PM  
Cosmos certainly has generated a ton of rectal pain in Derpville. Must chafe twice as much with it being broadcast on a Fox network.
 
2014-03-14 10:54:13 PM  

Silly_Sot: Those of us who don't want tax-and-handout politics, don't want idiots who can't understand the science they're trying to dispute, but also think gold bugs are mentally ill, really need a new political party. There's no home for us in any non-lunatic group.


When you spout inane GOP talking points like that, you really hurt your case that you don't belong with them.
 
2014-03-14 11:02:04 PM  
Okay, so I finally got my thoughts put together on Cosmos and its relationship with religion and I've got them here.  Forgive the truncated C&P.

The story of Giorodano Bruno, as told by Cosmos, is not just a historical retelling.  It is also an allegory for our modern times.  What the religious critics - especially McDonald and his historical relativism - don't recognize is that there are still people who think this way today.  Certainly there aren't any people advocating for burning heretics at the stake, but there are still people who think the Earth is six thousand years old because they counted up all of the "begats" in the Bible.  There are people who believe that the Biblical story of the Creation should not only be taken literally, but that this interpretation should be taught in school science classes.  Believe me, I'm from Kansas, I know of what I speak.

Let me be clear.  I am a Christian.  I believe that God created the heavens and the Earth.  But I also believe that science is our best tool for exploring and understanding God's creation.  Cosmos is not opposed to Christianity, nor is it opposed to religion.  It is opposed to the kind of anti-science rhetoric that would have United States Senators and Presidential candidates trying to "teach the controversy" in school classrooms.  It is opposed to those people who would exert such a strong force in politics that they would make the Governor of Texas afraid to even speculate on the age of our planet.  It is opposed to those who would say that evolution is "just a theory" but who don't understand what exactly a scientific theory is.

There is nothing inherently anti-Christian about Cosmos.  Rather, it is trying to say to those who would deny scientific accomplishments, "Your God is too small!"  To those who would believe that they can restrict the immensity and awesomeness of our Creator to a 1200-page book (or even to a 50-page section of that book), "Your God is too small!"  Cosmos insists that, if there is a God, He is far beyond our definitions.  He is a God so omnipotent that He can merely press a button (The Big Bang) and set the world He wants in motion.

Carl Sagan once said, "science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality."  There is nothing in Fox's Cosmos that denies this view.  The story of Giordano Bruno is not meant to be taken as a literal attack on the Catholic Church.  Rather it, like the Cosmic Calendar, is an allegory designed to inform us of the peril of ignoring progressive minds in favor of staid traditionalism.  Even if Bruno was a kook (which he basically was), his ideas deserved consideration.  And the religious minds of the time were unwilling to give consideration to ideas that did not fit their preconceived notions of God.  We live now in a time that is much more forgiving of different ideas, but we are still surrounded by people who are unwilling to give consideration to ideas that do not fit their preconceived notions of God.  Cosmos does not set out to ridicule these people, but rather that to make them realize that their God is just too small.
 
2014-03-14 11:27:39 PM  

Silly_Sot: Those of us who don't want tax-and-handout politics, don't want idiots who can't understand the science they're trying to dispute, but also think gold bugs are mentally ill, really need a new political party. There's no home for us in any non-lunatic group.


The important thing is that you've found a way to feel superior to both.
 
2014-03-15 03:52:25 AM  

rugman11: Okay, so I finally got my thoughts put together on Cosmos and its relationship with religion and I've got them here.  Forgive the truncated C&P.

The story of Giorodano Bruno, as told by Cosmos, is not just a historical retelling.  It is also an allegory for our modern times.  What the religious critics - especially McDonald and his historical relativism - don't recognize is that there are still people who think this way today.  Certainly there aren't any people advocating for burning heretics at the stake, but there are still people who think the Earth is six thousand years old because they counted up all of the "begats" in the Bible.  There are people who believe that the Biblical story of the Creation should not only be taken literally, but that this interpretation should be taught in school science classes.  Believe me, I'm from Kansas, I know of what I speak.

Let me be clear.  I am a Christian.  I believe that God created the heavens and the Earth.  But I also believe that science is our best tool for exploring and understanding God's creation.  Cosmos is not opposed to Christianity, nor is it opposed to religion.  It is opposed to the kind of anti-science rhetoric that would have United States Senators and Presidential candidates trying to "teach the controversy" in school classrooms.  It is opposed to those people who would exert such a strong force in politics that they would make the Governor of Texas afraid to even speculate on the age of our planet.  It is opposed to those who would say that evolution is "just a theory" but who don't understand what exactly a scientific theory is.

There is nothing inherently anti-Christian about Cosmos.  Rather, it is trying to say to those who would deny scientific accomplishments, "Your God is too small!"  To those who would believe that they can restrict the immensity and awesomeness of our Creator to a 1200-page book (or even to a 50-page section of that book), "Your God is too small!"  Cosmos insists that, if there ...


Thanks for sharing that. I for one will read and think about what you've said.
 
2014-03-15 06:36:35 AM  

Feepit: * denying the trinity
* denying the divinity of Christ
* denying Jesus as Christ
* denying the virgin birth
* denying transubstantiation
* advocating metempsychosis and the passage people's souls into animals
* advocating magic and sorcery


LOL

You gotta love the Church. I keep trying to pick out the one thing that's not like the other, but...
 
2014-03-15 03:41:57 PM  

rugman11: Okay, so I finally got my thoughts put together on Cosmos and its relationship with religion and I've got them here.  Forgive the truncated C&P.

The story of Giorodano Bruno, as told by Cosmos, is not just a historical retelling.  It is also an allegory for our modern times.  What the religious critics - especially McDonald and his historical relativism - don't recognize is that there are still people who think this way today.  Certainly there aren't any people advocating for burning heretics at the stake, but there are still people who think the Earth is six thousand years old because they counted up all of the "begats" in the Bible.  There are people who believe that the Biblical story of the Creation should not only be taken literally, but that this interpretation should be taught in school science classes.  Believe me, I'm from Kansas, I know of what I speak.

Let me be clear.  I am a Christian.  I believe that God created the heavens and the Earth.  But I also believe that science is our best tool for exploring and understanding God's creation.  Cosmos is not opposed to Christianity, nor is it opposed to religion.  It is opposed to the kind of anti-science rhetoric that would have United States Senators and Presidential candidates trying to "teach the controversy" in school classrooms.  It is opposed to those people who would exert such a strong force in politics that they would make the Governor of Texas afraid to even speculate on the age of our planet.  It is opposed to those who would say that evolution is "just a theory" but who don't understand what exactly a scientific theory is.

There is nothing inherently anti-Christian about Cosmos.  Rather, it is trying to say to those who would deny scientific accomplishments, "Your God is too small!"  To those who would believe that they can restrict the immensity and awesomeness of our Creator to a 1200-page book (or even to a 50-page section of that book), "Your God is too small!"  Cosmos insists that, if there ...


Very well put. I am not religious but I do not hold people who are in contempt. Some of the people I love most in this world are religious and I can totally understand it, I just don't feel it myself.
 
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