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(All Africa)   An apple a day keeps the doctor away. Pathologists, not so much, especially if the apple came from Kenya   (allafrica.com) divider line 19
    More: Scary, Kenyans, Ministry of Health, food processing, infectious diseases, cherries, pathologists, mangoes, Mombasa  
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1946 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Mar 2014 at 12:41 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-14 11:04:21 AM
Thanks Obama.
 
2014-03-14 11:18:29 AM
Thanks Applebama
 
2014-03-14 12:45:57 PM
Thanks Bananabama.
 
2014-03-14 12:48:20 PM
Only in kenya.....
 
2014-03-14 12:56:09 PM
Thanks Fartapple.
 
2014-03-14 01:05:23 PM
The chemistry mumbo jumbo was so badly wrong it was painful to read. Calcium carbide magically transmutes into phosphorus and arsenic when it decomposes? Color me impressed.
 
2014-03-14 01:20:51 PM
Coal Black and De Sebbin Dwarves?
 
2014-03-14 02:06:31 PM

Antz: The chemistry mumbo jumbo was so badly wrong it was painful to read. Calcium carbide magically transmutes into phosphorus and arsenic when it decomposes? Color me impressed.


Technically produced CaC2always contains traces of Cacium phosphide, and when there is Phosphorus, there are always traces of Arsenic. Google for the first fact, try to read -and understand-  the periodic table of elements for the second one.
 
2014-03-14 02:50:02 PM
I loves me some Calcium Carbide!  BOOM!


i204.photobucket.com
 
2014-03-14 02:50:36 PM

kbronsito: Thanks Obama.


Done in one.
 
2014-03-14 02:55:29 PM
What if the POTUS is from Kenya ?
 
2014-03-14 04:28:00 PM

AltheaToldMe: I loves me some Calcium Carbide!  BOOM!


[i204.photobucket.com image 640x480]


Nice design.
I use mine in lamps.
I have had a few miner's lamps since the 70s, and use then caving.
 
2014-03-14 04:41:28 PM

vudukungfu: Nice design.
I use mine in lamps.
I have had a few miner's lamps since the 70s, and use then caving.


You know what's funny?  Ever since my dad showed me how to make a paint can go boom, I was always afraid of the lamps.  I always had it in my mind that at some point, a stoichiometric ratio would be achieved in the lamp and it would go boom like the paint can or cannon.  I'm sure I'm wrong, but never the less, acetylene is nothing to trifle with.
 
2014-03-14 04:50:39 PM

Fritriac: Antz: The chemistry mumbo jumbo was so badly wrong it was painful to read. Calcium carbide magically transmutes into phosphorus and arsenic when it decomposes? Color me impressed.

Technically produced CaC2always contains traces of Cacium phosphide, and when there is Phosphorus, there are always traces of Arsenic. Google for the first fact, try to read -and understand-  the periodic table of elements for the second one.



Well, I kinda targeted my argument to be against inaccurate fear mongering, because statements such as "Calcium carbide has been banned in many countries because of its effects including dizziness, mental confusion, vomiting. The reason for this is that acetylene deprives the brain of oxygen. This leads to a condition called hypoxia" would mean that any gas that replaces oxygen should be banned. CaC2 reacts violently with water, so there certainly isn't any unreacted carbide in the fruit to release the acetylene within the body. And acetylene has been used as an anesthetic so it's not exactly lethal. And "Calcium carbide, when broken down, also contains phosphorus and arsenic compounds." is in itself incorrect, and should rather say that the low-quality calcium carbide they use contains dangerous impurities.

However, while I obviously don't know where the calcium carbide they used comes from, at least this site recommends that phosphorus impurities in the lime used for the preparation of CaC2 should amount to no more than 0.004 % (presumably w-%), which would mean that the impurities in technical calcium carbide are mainly unreacted calcium oxide. Trace amounts of arsenic from that amount of phosphorus would be trace indeed (particularly when you consider that the human body already has 1.1 w-% of phosphorus in it). Probably the limestone used in cheap manufacturing is of lesser purity though. From what I could find regarding coke, the second ingredient, is that it is high in sulfur content, but hardly any phosphorus is present there.

Obviously I'm not defending the practice of employing calcium carbide in fruit ripening. I'm arguing against inaccurate scientific writing (as I called it, chemistry mumbo jumbo). Even if there is a genuine issue that the article is addressing, if the 'facts' require interpretation in good faith - to go from deliberately misinforming to simply ignorant - it is in my opinion not helping the cause.
 
2014-03-14 05:54:39 PM
I notice that the article doesn't exactly say how the calc carbide is used to ripen the fruits; is it sprayed on as a powder? Left sitting in water so that the acetylene does it? How exactly is the arsenic absorbed? completely? on the skin only? My wife just went to SA for a month, and I'd really like to know the answers to these questions before I call her up and say "Hey, don't eat the apples".
 
2014-03-14 06:31:31 PM

kbronsito: Thanks Obama.


s1.postimg.orgs23.postimg.org
 
2014-03-14 07:25:09 PM
Nobody tell China about this stuff.
 
2014-03-14 07:35:29 PM

Fritriac: Antz: The chemistry mumbo jumbo was so badly wrong it was painful to read. Calcium carbide magically transmutes into phosphorus and arsenic when it decomposes? Color me impressed.

Technically produced CaC2always contains traces of Cacium phosphide, and when there is Phosphorus, there are always traces of Arsenic. Google for the first fact, try to read -and understand-  the periodic table of elements for the second one.


Whether or not that's true (I'm too lazy/boozed up to look it up), it never, ever decomposes into anything containing phosphorus or arsenic. Chemistry doesn't work that way. The article was a piece of shiat, scientifically speaking.
 
2014-03-14 10:33:10 PM

kbronsito: Thanks Obama.


i1307.photobucket.com
 
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