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(Slate)   Today's first world problem is brought to you by a college instructor who is upset students call her by her first name because she isn't a professor or a doctor   (slate.com) divider line 198
    More: Dumbass, teachers, Flagler, Inside Higher Ed, Dead Poets Society, University of New South Wales, colleges, professors  
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6695 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Mar 2014 at 7:05 AM (28 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-14 12:24:22 AM
Listen, Doc. You put in a lot of work for your doctorate and I'll refer you as sic. I won't, however, respect you because of this pointless tirade. I doubt you'll call me Reverend even thoug I'm an ordained minister of a recognized church.

/Internet church.
//Friend wanted me to perform her wedding.
 
2014-03-14 12:25:50 AM
FTFA: I myself feel rankled when someone who knows full well I have an earned doctorate refers to my male peers as "Professor" or "Doctor" yet calls me "Ms. Schuman." It happens all the time, and I often hear a sneer in the "izzzzz."

Not a doctor or professor? Submitter failed reading comprehension. And what she says is very real. I have female colleagues complain that former students of mine in her classes will refer to me as Dr. _______ when talking to her and then casually address her by her first name when they damn well know that she is Dr. _______. I see it with my female colleagues and African-American colleagues of both genders all the time.

Different colleges have different cultures. I once taught at a small liberal arts college where students and professors were encouraged to be on a first name basis. I never liked it but I played ball. At the larger institutions, you walk in and tell them up front you are Dr. so and so or Prof. so and so. Any rank, whether Lecturer, Assistant, Associate or otherwise, is entitled to be addressed as "Professor" when s/he is the "Instructor of Record" and thus responsible for the class to the registrar and department.
 
2014-03-14 12:30:22 AM
i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-14 12:31:33 AM
Every TA I've ever been taught by has asked to be called by their given name
Some of my professors with Doctorates expected to be called Dr., some were ok with Professor, a couple even went by their given name
Those with Masters Degrees usually went by their given name or Professor

However, EVERY SINGLE ONE expected a respectful, professional tone when talking to them.  It wasn't what you called them, it was how you said it that mattered.
 
2014-03-14 12:52:19 AM
I don't blame Dr. Gulliver for being annoyed; I myself feel rankled when someone who knows full well I have an earned doctorate refers to my male peers as "Professor" or "Doctor" yet calls me "Ms. Schuman." It happens all the time, and I often hear a sneer in the "izzzzz."

Oh, for f*ck's sake.
 
2014-03-14 02:55:51 AM

HotWingAgenda: I don't blame Dr. Gulliver for being annoyed; I myself feel rankled when someone who knows full well I have an earned doctorate refers to my male peers as "Professor" or "Doctor" yet calls me "Ms. Schuman." It happens all the time, and I often hear a sneer in the "izzzzz."

Oh, for f*ck's sake.


Yeah, it's pathetic.  If she were fully confident in her ability to direct the course of study and energize the students through discussion, she would not need to rely on enforced verbal cues that puff her up and emphasize the inferiority of the students.
 
2014-03-14 02:59:02 AM
And worse yet, at some institutions, such as Mr. Jefferson's Universitah, there has long been a tradition of professors with doctorates going by "Mr." and "Ms."

Someone get out the fainting couch for Mizzzzzzz Schuman!  I'm sure the educators at UVa suffer so much in the respect department by not being called "professor" at one of the leading institutions of higher learning in the entire country.  I mean, it's no UC-Irvine, but you know what I mean, toots.  Holy crap, the title thing is a big deal to you because you made it that way with this weirdly repressed arrogance.  If you want your students to call you professor, make that known on day one and don't act like you're life will be ruined if they screw it up.  If they call you something else, save the hissy fit for your poor husband.
 
2014-03-14 03:00:27 AM
You're, your, whatever, I'm not a professor.  Even if I was, if you called me Mr. Vittles, I wouldn't write a column about it.
 
2014-03-14 04:05:36 AM
What's wrong with HEY F*CK HEAD?
Seriously, if your teacher is so bent out of shape by a label, might as well drop the class, they will suck as a teacher.

Professor or Teacher.
TADA

Teacher works for ALL of them.

For the TA slaves? 
Whatever - who cares.
Sucks to be them no matter what you call them.
Buy them lunch and a beer and they will love you.
 
2014-03-14 04:28:24 AM
A few months ago I started a new job at a large university and I continually have to look up email signatures or titles in our directory to get things right, and it's almost absurd because I'm not anyone's student.  However, it did lead to an amusing exchange with one of my staff members who recently got his PhD.  We've been trying to get a 1,200 node grid off the ground and the research chair who is first in line to use it spends most of his days harassing the staff about when it's going to be set up.  My lead engineer, who I'll call Thomas, has been butting heads with the chair, who I'll call Dr. Richard Antsypants.

All three of us were in the data center last week troubleshooting.  I've been on a first name basis with Richard since the beginning and we're talking like we usually do.  Thomas is explaining that no one can submit jobs yet because the Qlogic cards aren't working correctly and he calls Dr. Antsypants 'Richard', at which point Richard says "I'm a doctor."  Without missing a beat, Thomas said "So am I, but it doesn't seem to help for this particular issue."

I waited for a pissing contest to break out, but Richard laughed and now everyone is on a first name basis.  Students should defer to their instructors, but outside of that relationship you have to be a real jerk to start throwing titles around.  I don't make people call me Director LSherm at work and Thomas sure as hell doesn't make anyone call him Dr. Thomas.  In a formal setting, like during first introductions?  Sure, the title is appropriate.  If you're going to be working with someone who isn't your student for an extended period of time?  Be reasonable.
 
2014-03-14 05:03:37 AM

namatad: What's wrong with HEY F*CK HEAD?


Because the moment you call your collage instructor that to your face, you'll end up hearing "I told you I wanted fries with that, asshole." for the rest of your life?
 
2014-03-14 05:27:24 AM

hardinparamedic: namatad: What's wrong with HEY F*CK HEAD?

Because the moment you call your collage instructor that to your face, you'll end up hearing "I told you I wanted fries with that, asshole." for the rest of your life?


As long as you're still paying tuition, it's nigh impossible to get kicked out of school, absent criminal activity or severe cases of cheating.
 
2014-03-14 06:16:12 AM

Lsherm: A few months ago I started a new job at a large university and I continually have to look up email signatures or titles in our directory to get things right, and it's almost absurd because I'm not anyone's student.  However, it did lead to an amusing exchange with one of my staff members who recently got his PhD.  We've been trying to get a 1,200 node grid off the ground and the research chair who is first in line to use it spends most of his days harassing the staff about when it's going to be set up.  My lead engineer, who I'll call Thomas, has been butting heads with the chair, who I'll call Dr. Richard Antsypants.

All three of us were in the data center last week troubleshooting.  I've been on a first name basis with Richard since the beginning and we're talking like we usually do.  Thomas is explaining that no one can submit jobs yet because the Qlogic cards aren't working correctly and he calls Dr. Antsypants 'Richard', at which point Richard says "I'm a doctor."  Without missing a beat, Thomas said "So am I, but it doesn't seem to help for this particular issue."

I waited for a pissing contest to break out, but Richard laughed and now everyone is on a first name basis.  Students should defer to their instructors, but outside of that relationship you have to be a real jerk to start throwing titles around.  I don't make people call me Director LSherm at work and Thomas sure as hell doesn't make anyone call him Dr. Thomas.  In a formal setting, like during first introductions?  Sure, the title is appropriate.  If you're going to be working with someone who isn't your student for an extended period of time?  Be reasonable.


I worked at a university for 8 years, and you could always tell who the insecure assholes were by how they demanded to be addressed. After one of them attempted to humiliate me by dressing me down in public for not calling him "doctor" I said "tell you what, Chuck, I'll address you as 'doctor last name' if you address me as 'mister last name' because as far as I'm concerned we're here on an equal basis."
Of course he wouldn't do that, because it was all about asserting his superiority and stroking his fragile ego.
 
2014-03-14 06:35:31 AM
Some broads don't like being called dames. Get used to it.
 
2014-03-14 07:10:56 AM
Start referring to her as "Dr.," but then deliberately get her last name wrong.

"Yes Dr. Sherbert."
"Here's my assignment Dr. Sherman."
"Sorry I was late Dr. Shortshiat."
"When's the next quiz Dr. Shoobie-doobie-doo?"
 
2014-03-14 07:13:36 AM
If you're not an MD you shouldn't be called 'doctor'. And in this day and age you shouldn't expect much respect from any student you aren't providing an assistantship to.
 
2014-03-14 07:15:03 AM
I prefer Mistress.
 
2014-03-14 07:16:14 AM
It's Herr Diplom-Ingenieur MekkaB, thank you very much.
 
2014-03-14 07:17:39 AM
look, if you can deliver a baby successfully I will call you "doctor" otherwise if you need a title you are an elitist pri*ck with a piece of paper you bought

/
 
2014-03-14 07:18:25 AM
I have an idea, from now on, let's just call everyone "Bob."

Regardless of your name, rank, position, gender, etc. Your name is now "Bob."
 
2014-03-14 07:18:41 AM
Our grad department was a very lax environment, but we had a rule for consistency (and in case some landlubber took one of our courses).

While class is in session, call your professor "Doctor (Last Name)".  Outside of that, you can be on a first-name basis if you choose.

We also had a few other rules for general professionalism and decorum:

You weren't allowed to get your professor drunk the night before an exam.

You could sleep on the couch in the classroom if you were going to be in the building all night, but you couldn't do so naked.

Same goes for riding your bike in the hall after-hours.

It is completely unacceptable to use the bathroom for discussions pertaining to conspiracy.  That went double for the women's restroom.

And very related to the previous rule, professors were explicitly barred from playing Diplomacy with any student if they were on that student's thesis committee.  Especially if that student is playing as Germany or Austria.
 
2014-03-14 07:20:33 AM
"Do me a favor, could you say 'professor' instead of 'ma'am?' It's just a thing, I worked so hard to get that title, so I'd appreciate it, yes, thank you."
 
2014-03-14 07:23:38 AM

assjuice: If you're not an MD you shouldn't be called 'doctor'. And in this day and age you shouldn't expect much respect from any student you aren't providing an assistantship to.


Nope. Academics had the title "doctor" first. I'm Dr. PCoC, a physicist. The person who fondles my balls once a year (no, I'm not talking about Mrs. PCoC) is a physician.
 
2014-03-14 07:23:49 AM
I really think Slate is just trolling us. I read half the article. At that point I realized that it was discussing a group of people who need therapy for what happened to them early in life.

When a student calls me "Mister," I do not correct the student because I am focused on his or her concern or idea or question. Maybe those teachers in the article would have a better position at university if they focused on the important things.

/professor
//tenured
///you can call me Steve if you like
 
2014-03-14 07:25:05 AM
 It takes a particularly privileged individual to insist, though he   when he walks into a room (even in jeans), that respect must be earned.


You can make students call you whatever you want, but respect still has to be earned. I know a few people with the degree that I'll call them 'Doctor', that's just being civil. They still have to earn respect by their behavior.

'What's up, Knight?" may not be an acceptable term, however.
 
2014-03-14 07:25:49 AM
She sounds bossy.
 
2014-03-14 07:26:07 AM

strangeluck: I have an idea, from now on, let's just call everyone "Bob."

Regardless of your name, rank, position, gender, etc. Your name is now "Bob."


Mind if we call you "Bruce" to keep it clear?
 
2014-03-14 07:26:10 AM
Whatever, lady.

/ But you doesn't have to call me Johnson.
 
2014-03-14 07:27:41 AM

diaphoresis: I prefer Mistress.


Me too, but please don't tell Mrs. KyDave
 
2014-03-14 07:29:42 AM
You know, I don't even call my doctor "doctor." Theoretically, we're all adults. That written, presuming people are being inconsistent, that the author isn't projecting, and that she's actually being treated unfairly: that's wrong.

/I'd call the president "Mr. President," however.
//Or "Ms. President," and not even sneer.
 
2014-03-14 07:30:13 AM
She IS in fact a PhD.http://www.arts.unsw.edu.au/about-us/people/katrina-gulliver/ , and teaching a class.  She isn't a TA.  That entitles her to the honorific of "Dr".

I work around a lot of PhDs.  I have also hung around in college for a few decades past getting my bachelors degree, scoring a masters and just taking classes.  IMHO, the general rule is that in the workplace, you call a PhD "Dr" until they tell you to knock it off.  In a university setting, I tend to use "professor" to indicate someone who is actually teaching a class, as opposed to pursuing work in their field.  Professor can be extended to instructors without doctorates, some of my instructors at community colleges have masters degrees.

A small amount of courtesy won't kill you, for heavens sake.  This is a university classroom, not the effing salad bar at Wendys.
 
2014-03-14 07:32:53 AM
Any teacher with a PhD. should be addressed as Dr by students. If you have a Ph.D. and work in a regular job, expect to be Mr. or Ms.
 
2014-03-14 07:32:59 AM
Oh get over yourselves. If I'm paying tens of thousands of dollars a year to take your courses, you work for me and I'll call you what I'm comfortable calling you. Miiizzzzzz. Schumann. I'm not paying big bucks to stroke your ego.

/so glad I got out of that college town
 
2014-03-14 07:34:21 AM
I used to teach college courses as an adjunct. I have a master's but not a doctorate. And I didn't give a rat's ass what my students called me. Mostly they called me by my first name.

It's college. Everyone there is an adult.

To me, this professor sounds like someone who is so insecure that she clings to her position and her credentials as some sort of validation of her worth as a person, and regards any failure to properly recognize her position and credentials as some sort of personal affront.
 
2014-03-14 07:35:20 AM
Unavailable for comment:

3.bp.blogspot.com

sorreldrydencopywriter.co.uk
 
2014-03-14 07:35:58 AM
i am a teacher, and have many degrees. my students call me by my first name. it's cool

hey, some...how you doing?
how are you today mr. drinker?

meh
 
2014-03-14 07:36:00 AM

UNC_Samurai: strangeluck: I have an idea, from now on, let's just call everyone "Bob."

Regardless of your name, rank, position, gender, etc. Your name is now "Bob."

Mind if we call you "Bruce" to keep it clear?


We are all Bob, embrace Bob, and accept Bob into your heart.

Welcome, Bob.
 
2014-03-14 07:40:25 AM

OtherLittleGuy: Unavailable for comment:


It's a real shame they didn't work Ace into the 50th. The audio plays with her going to the Gallifreyan Academy are quasi-canon, and she would have made for an interesting character during the Time War.
 
2014-03-14 07:40:32 AM
Could just be me, but I was raised to always refer to someone by their title (if you know it, if you don't it's Mr. or Ms.), and that includes calling someone doctor ______ if they have a MD or PhD unless they ask you to address them otherwise. I had a few professors that said "you don't have to refer to me as doctor" and others that preferred to be referred to as doctor. It's up to the individual, but have respect for them and address them by their title and last name until they instruct you to do otherwise.

/dnrta
 
2014-03-14 07:42:05 AM

Cybernetic: I used to teach college courses as an adjunct. I have a master's but not a doctorate. And I didn't give a rat's ass what my students called me. Mostly they called me by my first name.

It's college. Everyone there is an adult.

To me, this professor sounds like someone who is so insecure that she clings to her position and her credentials as some sort of validation of her worth as a person, and regards any failure to properly recognize her position and credentials as some sort of personal affront.


The thing is, that's YOUR call.
 
2014-03-14 07:44:16 AM
Look if you have a Ph.D. related to your job then at work your title is Dr. Xxxxxx. Which is for formal communications, such as between student and teacher.

People in this thread who think that's pretentious will call all PhDs something else. That's Ok but it could also instantly identify you as someone who has a chip on their shoulder about degrees.
 
2014-03-14 07:47:06 AM
Unless I knew they were a Doctor, I would always refer to my instructor as "Professor". Even if they were a doctor, I still did it when they told me to call them by their first name.

Prank Call of Cthulhu: assjuice: If you're not an MD you shouldn't be called 'doctor'. And in this day and age you shouldn't expect much respect from any student you aren't providing an assistantship to.

Nope. Academics had the title "doctor" first. I'm Dr. PCoC, a physicist. The person who fondles my balls once a year (no, I'm not talking about Mrs. PCoC) is a physician.


I'm glad I reread that, because I originally read that you were "Dr. PcOC, a Psychiatrist" and was about to ask if needed to have an MD on top of a PhD to be considered a Psychiatrist.

I need more coffee.
 
2014-03-14 07:48:54 AM
Wait. Did this happen at MISTER Jefferson's university?
 
2014-03-14 07:49:35 AM
I thought Gulliver was a first name??
 
2014-03-14 07:52:25 AM

Animatronik: Look if you have a Ph.D. related to your job then at work your title is Dr. Xxxxxx. Which is for formal communications, such as between student and teacher.

People in this thread who think that's pretentious will call all PhDs something else. That's Ok but it could also instantly identify you as someone who has a chip on their shoulder about degrees.


Do I still have to call him Dr, Professor or Mr if I'm polishing his knob?

Have you ever been to a faculty party, where it becomes clear that half of them, married or not are farking their students (and the other half will openly tell you about their swingers club).
 
2014-03-14 07:53:04 AM

namatad: For the TA slaves?
Whatever - who cares.
Sucks to be them no matter what you call them.
Buy them lunch and a beer and they will love you.


I was always nice to the teaching assistants.  It doesn't hurt to have someone in your corner when trouble crops up.  Hell, I had one TA talk a hardass professor into giving me a make-up when I slept through the final exam.
 
2014-03-14 07:53:29 AM

OhioUGrad: Could just be me, but I was raised to always refer to someone by their title (if you know it, if you don't it's Mr. or Ms.), and that includes calling someone doctor ______ if they have a MD or PhD unless they ask you to address them otherwise. I had a few professors that said "you don't have to refer to me as doctor" and others that preferred to be referred to as doctor. It's up to the individual, but have respect for them and address them by their title and last name until they instruct you to do otherwise.

/dnrta


I had a Vice President at OU tell me that I could call him by his first name. I was an 18 year old freshman that just started so I had to pass since I didn't find it respectful. I had a lot of respect for the guy since he was spending his time in a Freshman intro class.
 
2014-03-14 07:53:59 AM

dryknife: She sounds bossy.


+1

She sounds derpy.
 
2014-03-14 07:55:34 AM
www.examiner.com


Dammit, Jim!
 
2014-03-14 07:56:04 AM

strangeluck: UNC_Samurai: strangeluck: I have an idea, from now on, let's just call everyone "Bob."

Regardless of your name, rank, position, gender, etc. Your name is now "Bob."

Mind if we call you "Bruce" to keep it clear?

We are all Bob, embrace Bob, and accept Bob into your heart.

Welcome, Bob.


I think you're in violation of rule six, ya pommey bastard
 
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