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(Huffington Post UK)   Forget about all those crazy theories of what happened to the missing Malaysian Airlines flight, this student knows what happened   (huffingtonpost.co.uk) divider line 181
    More: Interesting, Malaysia Airlines, Andrew Aude, aviation fuel, patrol boats, civil aviation, Gulf of Thailand, major-generals, AFP PHOTO  
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19126 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2014 at 6:45 PM (32 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-13 07:10:10 PM  

Andy Andy: antidisestablishmentarianism: I don't see how this explains the engines being on for 4 hours after communication was lost.

Autopilot?


You don`t even need autopilot to fly straight.  If your trim is set right, you can just let go of the stick and it will pretty much fly itself.
 
2014-03-13 07:10:15 PM  
Isn't there a thing where the cabin depressurizes and then the temp drops to like -80 instantly and everybody freezes to death, but the plane keeps flying? I thought something like that happened on a GulfStream a few years back. The military flew near the plane and the windows were all frosted over while the autopilot kept it going until it ran out of fuel?
 
2014-03-13 07:10:38 PM  

fusillade762: Aude also has an explanation for the ringing phones, saying: "If the plane flew over or near land, then cellular connectivity is still possible."

What ringing phones? This is the first I've heard of that. And how high do cell towers reach?


It doesn't explain the ringing phones, because that thing was supposedly taking place 2-3 days after the flight went missing.

And to bring you up to speed on it, families of the passengers were saying that when they dialed the missing people's phones, they would hear ringing for a minute before going to voice mail.  This has been explained away as basically the sound of the network looking for a phone.
 
2014-03-13 07:11:18 PM  
Airplanes are not balloons people.  They take in and lose cabin atmosphere all the time.  if there was a slow leak in the pressure vessel, an outflow valve wold just close a bit more, allowing more air out of the plane than would  normally flow out, and that would be that.
 
2014-03-13 07:11:42 PM  

Andulamb: It's a theory, like all the rest. No one will know what happened to the plane until we know what happened to the plane.


THIS.
 
2014-03-13 07:12:03 PM  

meow said the dog: No one has asked to me what has happened but it is known of me.


Meow for us Meow
 
2014-03-13 07:12:19 PM  

wxboy: It doesn't explain the ringing phones, because that thing was supposedly taking place 2-3 days after the flight went missing.

And to bring you up to speed on it, families of the passengers were saying that when they dialed the missing people's phones, they would hear ringing for a minute before going to voice mail.  This has been explained away as basically the sound of the network looking for a phone.


I can explain the ringing phones!

markbiwwa.com
 
2014-03-13 07:12:40 PM  

cfletch13: Triumph: NBC News is saying radar picked up a u-turn. So much for this theory.

It  might have made a turn.  When an aircraft gets near the maximum range of passive radar, the data becomes much less conclusive.


Yes, it seems most people don't realize that radar and radio aren't worldwide without gaps.
 
2014-03-13 07:12:43 PM  

KeithLM: So yes, four hours straight over the water at high altitude could avoid radar altogether.


So yes, four hours straight over the water at high altitude could avoid radar.
 
2014-03-13 07:12:58 PM  

FnkyTwn: Isn't there a thing where the cabin depressurizes and then the temp drops to like -80 instantly and everybody freezes to death, but the plane keeps flying? I thought something like that happened on a GulfStream a few years back. The military flew near the plane and the windows were all frosted over while the autopilot kept it going until it ran out of fuel?


(1) you will die from oxygen starvation sooner than freezing.
(2) That incident is no longer possible. The new models have sensors to detect depressurization and the AP flies the plane down to 12,000 feet.
 
2014-03-13 07:13:27 PM  
Aude also has an explanation for the ringing phones, saying: "If the plane flew over or near land, then cellular connectivity is still possible."

If his understanding of aeronautics is as bad as his understanding of cellular technology (or even just Plain Old Telephone Service), then I wouldn't hold my breath that his theory is correct. Just because a phone seems to be ringing on the caller's end doesn't mean that the device is actually ringing, or even being reached.
 
2014-03-13 07:14:08 PM  
Wouldn't the oxygen masks drop. Kind of a hint. Maybe I should put this on. It would kind of suck if I was the only one though. WTF do I do now?
 
2014-03-13 07:15:18 PM  

WhyteRaven74: Triumph: NBC News is saying radar picked up a u-turn. So much for this theory.

Crew could've been trying to turn in reaction to some issue they had and then the decompression happened or was happening as they turned. The thing with this theory is, it's perfectly reasonable and doesn't require any sort of crazy circumstances.


It has to be something that quickly killed or incapacitated the entire crew and passengers (or else someone would have at least tried to make phone or radio contact), damaged or destroyed the electrical systems (or else the transponders would have registered on tracking systems longer), and yet not damaged the hydraulics or engines immediately (or the plane would have crashed sooner).

So that points to a rapid decompression like the Payne Stewart crash only bigger; or a swift-moving electrical fire in the cabin, killing everyone with smoke.

Which doesn't help find it.
 
2014-03-13 07:15:22 PM  

wxboy: fusillade762: Aude also has an explanation for the ringing phones, saying: "If the plane flew over or near land, then cellular connectivity is still possible."

What ringing phones? This is the first I've heard of that. And how high do cell towers reach?

It doesn't explain the ringing phones, because that thing was supposedly taking place 2-3 days after the flight went missing.

And to bring you up to speed on it, families of the passengers were saying that when they dialed the missing people's phones, they would hear ringing for a minute before going to voice mail.  This has been explained away as basically the sound of the network looking for a phone.


There was also some stuff about them appearing "Online" on some Chinese social media.

Which is also meaningless. I see friends on FB "online" all the time when they aren't.
 
2014-03-13 07:15:55 PM  

cfletch13: This happened to a Greek airliner that crashed into a mountain, if I recall correctly. Some of the pressurization switches on the flight deck was switched off during line maintenance on the ground. When the plane reached cruising altitude, the crew and passengers experienced hypoxia and the plane flew straight into the side of a mountain.


Only after the autopilot finished the run to Athens, put the aircraft into a holding pattern, and kept circling until it ran out of fuel. Which was when a flight attendant woke up and went into the cockpit, just in time for the ride into the side of a mountain.

Creepy as fark.
 
2014-03-13 07:15:59 PM  

fanbladesaresharp: fusillade762: Aude also has an explanation for the ringing phones, saying: "If the plane flew over or near land, then cellular connectivity is still possible."

What ringing phones? This is the first I've heard of that. And how high do cell towers reach?

It's already been said in related threads; that ringing you hear isn't generated by the cell phone itself. My battery can die in mine and yet it still "rings" when I call it from any other phone, cell or landline.


The reports said that the calls weren't picked up by voicemail either. At what point does that come into the cell phone equation?
 
2014-03-13 07:16:10 PM  

fluffy2097: wxboy: It doesn't explain the ringing phones, because that thing was supposedly taking place 2-3 days after the flight went missing.

And to bring you up to speed on it, families of the passengers were saying that when they dialed the missing people's phones, they would hear ringing for a minute before going to voice mail.  This has been explained away as basically the sound of the network looking for a phone.

I can explain the ringing phones!

[markbiwwa.com image 800x600]


If you cant dazzle em with brilliance......Baffle em with bullshiat
 
2014-03-13 07:16:13 PM  

BigNumber12: KeithLM: So yes, four hours straight over the water at high altitude could avoid radar altogether.

So yes, four hours straight over the water at high altitude could avoid radar.


That's not important right now.
 
2014-03-13 07:16:56 PM  

shastacola: centrifugal bumblepuppy: ABC reports that the two communication systems, ACARS and transponder, were shut down 15 minutes apart.

Sounds deliberate.

An expert on CNN is flat out saying it can't be an accident.


If he was any credible expert, he would be saying that no one can determine that at this stage.  Unfortunately, cable news channel producers and viewers like definitive answers. But there are not any... yet.
 
2014-03-13 07:17:06 PM  

Perducci: Aude also has an explanation for the ringing phones, saying: "If the plane flew over or near land, then cellular connectivity is still possible."

If his understanding of aeronautics is as bad as his understanding of cellular technology (or even just Plain Old Telephone Service), then I wouldn't hold my breath that his theory is correct. Just because a phone seems to be ringing on the caller's end doesn't mean that the device is actually ringing, or even being reached.


My theory is that they are actually in a North Korean prison camp. Best Korea needed a 777.
 
2014-03-13 07:17:08 PM  

antidisestablishmentarianism: I don't see how this explains the engines being on for 4 hours after communication was lost.


Would they stay on if the plane landed/crashed onto the canopy of a forest?
 
2014-03-13 07:18:01 PM  
An electrical fire initially disables the communications so the pilot turns around to find the nearest airport.  The fire then spreads to the navigation systems....Unable to communicate and possibly unable to even see out of the cockpit due to the smoke they finally succumb to smoke inhalation after the O2 system is depleted.  They tell the passengers to try and make cell calls so they all switch them on but they are out to sea and there is no signal.  Finally the pilots and passengers pass out/die but somehow autopilot is still engaged.  The plane carries on it's merry way passing into cell coverage range full of turned on phones with dead passengers....

It runs out of fuel and crashes...

/you'd think if they were in cell phone range they'd be picked up on radar but who knows...
 
2014-03-13 07:18:18 PM  

scottydoesntknow: [i.huffpost.com image 570x238]

They probably could've picked a better photo than one that makes him look like he's one of America's Most Wanted.



That ginger was probably responsible for the whole thing.
 
2014-03-13 07:18:24 PM  
I bet he also found the Boston Bombers before the Feds did.

i.imgur.com
 
2014-03-13 07:19:14 PM  

BigNumber12: KeithLM: So yes, four hours straight over the water at high altitude could avoid radar altogether.

So yes, four hours straight over the water at high altitude could avoid radar.


www.wearysloth.com
 
2014-03-13 07:20:20 PM  

cfletch13: This happened to a Greek airliner that crashed into a mountain, if I recall correctly.  Some of the pressurization switches on the flight deck was switched off during line maintenance on the ground.  When the plane reached cruising altitude, the crew and passengers experienced hypoxia and the plane flew straight into the side of a mountain.

As of right now, that's as good as any explanation.  My question is, though... why wasn't the aircraft picked up on any other passive radar systems if it just kept flying straight


IIRC, that plane followed its last autopilot controls and eventually circled Athens waiting the for the pilots instructions until it ran out of fuel and crashed.  The Paine Stewart flight did more-or-less the same thing, flying in a straight line via autopilot (though it changed altitude) until the fuel ran out.

Presumably, even if everyone was unconscious or dead on the plane, it would have continued on to Beijing.  It should have followed its pre programmed flight path until the fuel ran out.  At the least, it should have been picked up by Vietnam on their radar and contacted.  According to the information we've been told, they never did.

Didn't we have something like this happen a dozen years or so ago with another airliner?  I seem to recall there was the crash of a Boeing 737 (Lion Air?) that was missing for a few days before anyone located the wreckage.  The pilot ended up off course or something after being lost in a storm?  Am I remembering this right?
 
2014-03-13 07:20:23 PM  

cretinbob: cfletch13: Triumph: NBC News is saying radar picked up a u-turn. So much for this theory.

It  might have made a turn.  When an aircraft gets near the maximum range of passive radar, the data becomes much less conclusive.

Yes, it seems most people don't realize that radar and radio aren't worldwide without gaps.


I hate when people assume hyper-competence.  It kills me every time I see an article or someone on Facebook saying, "How can you just lose a plane in this day and age?".  People really misunderstand how things ACTUALLY work in aviation.
 
2014-03-13 07:20:36 PM  

fusillade762: Aude also has an explanation for the ringing phones, saying: "If the plane flew over or near land, then cellular connectivity is still possible."

What ringing phones? This is the first I've heard of that. And how high do cell towers reach?


all of them
 
2014-03-13 07:21:41 PM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: An electrical fire initially disables the communications so the pilot turns around to find the nearest airport.  The fire then spreads to the navigation systems....Unable to communicate and possibly unable to even see out of the cockpit due to the smoke they finally succumb to smoke inhalation after the O2 system is depleted.  They tell the passengers to try and make cell calls so they all switch them on but they are out to sea and there is no signal.  Finally the pilots and passengers pass out/die but somehow autopilot is still engaged.  The plane carries on it's merry way passing into cell coverage range full of turned on phones with dead passengers....

It runs out of fuel and crashes...

/you'd think if they were in cell phone range they'd be picked up on radar but who knows...


They would have triangulated the phones and found them in minutes.
 
2014-03-13 07:21:51 PM  

cfletch13: shastacola: centrifugal bumblepuppy: ABC reports that the two communication systems, ACARS and transponder, were shut down 15 minutes apart.

Sounds deliberate.

An expert on CNN is flat out saying it can't be an accident.

If he was any credible expert, he would be saying that no one can determine that at this stage.  Unfortunately, cable news channel producers and viewers like definitive answers. But there are not any... yet.


Actually his comment was in regard to the communication systems being shut off 15 minutes apart. He said that would be impossible. His name was John Nance,he's supposedly an aviation expert.
 
2014-03-13 07:21:57 PM  
The first actual sign of mechanical malfunction that causes a drop in Boeing stock is going to make me a happy camper.

Buy, Mortimer, buy!
 
2014-03-13 07:22:02 PM  

cfletch13: You don`t even need autopilot to fly straight. If your trim is set right, you can just let go of the stick and it will pretty much fly itself.


A lot of people don't know airliners, hell most planes, are designed so that as long as the trim is set right, if you let go of the controls the plane will fly straight and level until it runs out of fuel.
 
2014-03-13 07:24:36 PM  
It's Malaysia Airlines.  :-)  IATA code "MH" which stands for "masih hilang" which is Malay for "still missing".
 
2014-03-13 07:24:40 PM  

lindalouwho: antidisestablishmentarianism: I don't see how this explains the engines being on for 4 hours after communication was lost.

Would they stay on if the plane landed/crashed onto the canopy of a forest?


I wouldn't think so with the amount of fuel lost and eventual destruction of the systems.
 
2014-03-13 07:26:32 PM  

NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: An electrical fire initially disables the communications so the pilot turns around to find the nearest airport.  The fire then spreads to the navigation systems....Unable to communicate and possibly unable to even see out of the cockpit due to the smoke they finally succumb to smoke inhalation after the O2 system is depleted.  They tell the passengers to try and make cell calls so they all switch them on but they are out to sea and there is no signal.  Finally the pilots and passengers pass out/die but somehow autopilot is still engaged.  The plane carries on it's merry way passing into cell coverage range full of turned on phones with dead passengers....

It runs out of fuel and crashes...

/you'd think if they were in cell phone range they'd be picked up on radar but who knows...

They would have triangulated the phones and found them in minutes.


If that capacity is available in south east asia...they might not archive cell phone positions on their system
 
2014-03-13 07:27:02 PM  
Payne Stewart approves!
 
2014-03-13 07:28:10 PM  
Meh. I know why it disappeared. Broken Johnson rod. Or a Thelmen wire came loose. Case closed. Goodnight everybody!
 
2014-03-13 07:28:39 PM  
Everyone on the plane sought political asylum in Atlantis
 
2014-03-13 07:28:57 PM  

meow said the dog: No one has asked to me what has happened but it is known of me.


Don't' leave us hanging like this meow
Is it hiding in Macau?
Crashed near India? holy cow!
Swiped by terrorists,  but how?
Smashed or hidden? Tell us now!
or must we bribe your roommate sow
with cake
and pie.
 
2014-03-13 07:31:04 PM  

shastacola: cfletch13: shastacola: centrifugal bumblepuppy: ABC reports that the two communication systems, ACARS and transponder, were shut down 15 minutes apart.

Sounds deliberate.

An expert on CNN is flat out saying it can't be an accident.

If he was any credible expert, he would be saying that no one can determine that at this stage.  Unfortunately, cable news channel producers and viewers like definitive answers. But there are not any... yet.

Actually his comment was in regard to the communication systems being shut off 15 minutes apart. He said that would be impossible. His name was John Nance,he's supposedly an aviation expert.


Which communication system did he say?  ACARS?  And how can anyone determine if or when the transponder was shut off?  The aircraft was being picked up on primary radar from KUA all the way to the maximum range.  I haven't seen any data that shows the transponder data being picked up by another passive radar or another aircraft in one moment and gone in another.
 
2014-03-13 07:31:32 PM  

shastacola: cfletch13: shastacola: centrifugal bumblepuppy: ABC reports that the two communication systems, ACARS and transponder, were shut down 15 minutes apart.

Sounds deliberate.

An expert on CNN is flat out saying it can't be an accident.

If he was any credible expert, he would be saying that no one can determine that at this stage.  Unfortunately, cable news channel producers and viewers like definitive answers. But there are not any... yet.

Actually his comment was in regard to the communication systems being shut off 15 minutes apart. He said that would be impossible. His name was John Nance,he's supposedly an aviation expert.



Are you sure you heard him correctly? In this article, Nance suggests that the time separation between the shutdowns of the data reporting system and the transponder is an indication of a deliberate act, i.e., not an accident.
 
2014-03-13 07:32:45 PM  
cretinbob:

i just want to thank you for the payne stewart.i guess it went over everyone's head.
 
2014-03-13 07:33:10 PM  
It was probably the ball bearings. It's all about ball bearings these days.
 
2014-03-13 07:33:15 PM  
I figured it out


img.fark.net
 
2014-03-13 07:33:34 PM  
Andrew Aude, a computer science student, who "considered studying Aerospace engineering",

Stopped-reading-right-there.jpg
 
2014-03-13 07:34:02 PM  
Or, its communications systems were systematically shut down, and the plane is now in the Indian Ocean:

http://abcnews.go.com/International/malaysia-airliner-pinging-indica ti on-crashed-indian-ocean/story?id=22894802
 
2014-03-13 07:36:06 PM  

MFAWG: gilgigamesh: It's an interesting theory, and it seems to fit the facts.

I'd be interested to know if the decompression he describes would also disable the transponders. That is the part of this I find most baffling.

You ever watch those old Air Force training videos where they start removing oxygen from a room while having the test subject try to perform simple tasks?

It's possible the pilot shut the transponder off simply because he was disoriented.


I keep suggesting this and nobody listens to me. Hypoxia makes you act drunk and stupid, and you don't feel impaired at all. Maybe he shut off the transponder because he was cold.
 
2014-03-13 07:36:22 PM  
My theory is that S.P.E.C.T.R.E. is behind the disappearances and that we should all be looking for a fake volcano.
 
2014-03-13 07:36:47 PM  

Lydia_C: shastacola: cfletch13: shastacola: centrifugal bumblepuppy: ABC reports that the two communication systems, ACARS and transponder, were shut down 15 minutes apart.

Sounds deliberate.

An expert on CNN is flat out saying it can't be an accident.

If he was any credible expert, he would be saying that no one can determine that at this stage.  Unfortunately, cable news channel producers and viewers like definitive answers. But there are not any... yet.

Actually his comment was in regard to the communication systems being shut off 15 minutes apart. He said that would be impossible. His name was John Nance,he's supposedly an aviation expert.


Are you sure you heard him correctly? In this article, Nance suggests that the time separation between the shutdowns of the data reporting system and the transponder is an indication of a deliberate act, i.e., not an accident.


That's what I said,he said it can't be an accident,it was a  deliberate shutdown of the communication systems.
 
2014-03-13 07:40:18 PM  
"Wow! This is the first time I am hearing this theory!" said no one.
 
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