Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NYPost)   Wells Fargo quite literally wrote the manual on how to evict people from homes for which the bank didn't hold a legal mortgage   (nypost.com) divider line 32
    More: Sick, southern district, federal courts, Wells Fargo, proper authority  
•       •       •

11293 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2014 at 5:43 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

d23 [TotalFark]
2014-03-13 06:05:22 PM  
5 votes:

ZAZ: I have mentioned before some corporate antitrust training I had to go through. It taught us how to avoid creating evidence that would look bad in court. It had nothing to do with avoiding antitrust violations. Any anticompetitive policies were defined and implemented by top management, not ordinary cubicle occupants. I'm sure there is a similar division in Wells Fargo. You have the people who decide whether the company is evil, and you have other people who make sure all the paperwork describes a company that stays on the right side of the law.


Zaz, there is no point size or level of boldness that allows me to express the word "bullshiat" with the proper level of emphasis.

Many, many, many people were thrown out of their homes in an illegal way and, if they were lucky, were only paid back a few pennies on the dollar.  The fact that it was done under the guise of a corporation and "for the shareholders" doesn't excuse that fact.  And, to further emphasize the above point, the belief that they didn't cover their their tracks because of "training" and not because they knew something was underhanded is plain, unadulterated, 100%, pure-d BULLshiat.  Everyone from the CEO to the mail clerk is complicit, and the guys in the top levels should be in jail.  The fact that they aren't right now shows how much the banks own our governmental process right now.
2014-03-13 06:34:50 PM  
4 votes:
I might have a smidgeon of sympathy for the banks if they weren't routinely foreclosing on properties they don't own or have any legal title to. Their shenanigans have cost them any goodwill I might have had. Fark 'em. If they can't get their shiat together then the mortgage should be declared defunct and the current owner given full title clear and free. Attempts to create paperwork retroactively should be regarded as fraud and dealt with accordingly. Those who've been the victim of this sort of bullshiat should be compensated accordingly.
2014-03-13 05:52:47 PM  
4 votes:

fusillade762: When haven't they been?


When they were caught committing mortgage fraud.  They had to pay out several bonuses worth of cash to make the charges go away.  Never mind that if you or I committed the crime we'd be in jail.
2014-03-13 04:34:59 PM  
4 votes:
Don

ZAZ: Nothing in the article says Wells Fargo was doing anything worse than throwing out deadbeats. It is consistent with the bank acting on primarily based on MERS records and checking paperwork only when paperwork is requested. The big banks can afford lawyers who know better than to create an actually incriminating document, as opposed to one that reporters can imagine is incriminating.

I have mentioned before some corporate antitrust training I had to go through. It taught us how to avoid creating evidence that would look bad in court. It had nothing to do with avoiding antitrust violations. Any anticompetitive policies were defined and implemented by top management, not ordinary cubicle occupants. I'm sure there is a similar division in Wells Fargo. You have the people who decide whether the company is evil, and you have other people who make sure all the paperwork describes a company that stays on the right side of the law.


Don;t be so Sure.   There is a reason that Well et al cut that $25 billion settlement check to the State attorneys general over this behavior.  And I have no doubt that Wells will seek dismissal of this suit precisely on the grounds that they settlement check covered this naughtiness as well.

Having title vested in MERS itself was a violation of the law in nearly every state it was used in
2014-03-13 10:56:14 PM  
3 votes:

Tommy Moo: The article's content doesn't even justify its own headline, let alone subby's. This is nothing more than Wells Fargo documenting a method of preventing delinquent homeowners from avoiding foreclosure via a legal loophole.


Proving you actually own the mortgage before throwing someone out on the street is a legal loophole?
d23 [TotalFark]
2014-03-13 06:10:39 PM  
3 votes:

Magorn: Don;t be so Sure. There is a reason that Well et al cut that $25 billion settlement check to the State attorneys general over this behavior. And I have no doubt that Wells will seek dismissal of this suit precisely on the grounds that they settlement check covered this naughtiness as well.


Pennies on the dollar.  No one even NEAR to being made whole.  Corporate larceny done right under the nose of politicians paid off by campaign cash.  And, to top it all off, the CEOs that so many people worship are Millionaires because of the cash that was made off came from corporate stealing.  And so many people shrug and say "it's only business" and continue to call these criminals "smart" on CNBC.
2014-03-13 04:33:18 PM  
3 votes:
2014-03-13 04:26:17 PM  
3 votes:

ZAZ: Nothing in the article says Wells Fargo was doing anything worse than throwing out deadbeats. It is consistent with the bank acting on primarily based on MERS records and checking paperwork only when paperwork is requested. The big banks can afford lawyers who know better than to create an actually incriminating document, as opposed to one that reporters can imagine is incriminating.

I have mentioned before some corporate antitrust training I had to go through. It taught us how to avoid creating evidence that would look bad in court. It had nothing to do with avoiding antitrust violations. Any anticompetitive policies were defined and implemented by top management, not ordinary cubicle occupants. I'm sure there is a similar division in Wells Fargo. You have the people who decide whether the company is evil, and you have other people who make sure all the paperwork describes a company that stays on the right side of the law.


I can't tell you how much faith in the system that gives me.
2014-03-14 01:25:09 AM  
2 votes:

pla: Look, Wells Fargo et al have attained a level of evil that threatens to depose the very Devil himself.  But TFA ain't the reason.  TFA basically describes them violating a technicality, and not (as TFS makes it sound) Wells Fargo going around evicting random people with no connection to them (spare me the random links to cleanout contractors screwing up La la la I can't hear you - Yes, mistakes happen, get over it).


Carrying water for billion dollar criminals is not going to get Paris Hilton to sleep with you.  Mistakes do not "happen".  Mistakes are made.  And when mistakes are made, the ones who made them should pay.  No, not just the convenient fly-by-night "contractors" whom the big banks employ to take the blame for their screwups and then fold up shop and reappear in another state.  They should pay, but once they're stripped of all assets down to the last paperclip, the banks should pay too.  If the banks don't like paying for their farkups, they should take responsibility for their own actions.  You know -- that personal responsibility that you right wing loons are always prattling about.

 The sheer scale of this problem makes it a borderline atrocity, but lets spare all the feelgood BS...The very Boobies in this thread already nailed it: Banks evict deadbeats.  Simple as that.  The entire situation has no moral high-ground.  Bank sucks, mortgage brokers suck, deadbeat "owners" suck, and bailing the banks out instead of lining their CEOs up against a wall sucks.  But no one deserves the least bit of sympathy (much less righteous indignation) in all that.

How about whatever person or corporation does, in fact, hold the mortgage?  Who does in fact have the right to foreclose, and to decide whether or not it is in their best interest to foreclose or cut the borrower some slack?  Who then finds their property stolen out from under them by some organized crime syndicate with a charter?  Did you useful idiots for billion dollar gansters ever think about that?
2014-03-13 08:52:08 PM  
2 votes:

ChicagoKev: d23: Many, many, many people were thrown out of their homes in an illegal way and, if they were lucky, were only paid back a few pennies on the dollar.

I call BS on this claim.

As Loren points out, there are just two cases in this thread where a bank foreclosed when the homeowner was not delinquent.   Two cases out of how many foreclosures?

Yes, you can claim that mortgages were sold and resold and securitized into tranches until the paper trail was murky and it was difficult to demonstrate that the particular bank doing the foreclosure was the "true owner" of the debt.    But was there a debt, and out of the "many many people" who were thrown out, all but two of them missed multiple mortgage payments.

If you  borrow money with a house as collateral then fail to make payments, why act shocked when you are evicted?   You can try to make this about bad paperwork, but in the end, with two exceptions, everybody in foreclosure admittedly borrowed a huge sum of money and stopped making payments.


What's your point? Foreclosure is basically using the other party for not fulfilling contract terms. There are specific laws and procedures for foreclosing on someone. You have to have all your t's crossed and your ducks in a row. We're the foreclosed owners wrong for not paying. Absolutely. But the bank has to go through the proper channels to foreclose. Should they be able to go to the judge without proper paperwork? "Just trust us. We don't have the proper paperwork, but we can legally take the property." Just because the debtors are deadbeats, doesn't mean you don't have to show proper cause for foreclosure. The ends don't justify the means.
pla
2014-03-13 08:47:59 PM  
2 votes:
Look, Wells Fargo et al have attained a level of evil that threatens to depose the very Devil himself.  But TFA ain't the reason.  TFA basically describes them violating a technicality, and not (as TFS makes it sound) Wells Fargo going around evicting random people with no connection to them (spare me the random links to cleanout contractors screwing up - Yes, mistakes happen, get over it).

 These evictions remove people deep under water from overpriced houses with a mortgage they never should have gotten.  If you don't pay Rent-A-Center for your couch, they take it away.  If you don't pay Chrysler your monthly car payment, they take it away.  And if you don't pay your mortgage... Can anyone spot the pattern here?  Right: They take it away.

 The sheer scale of this problem makes it a borderline atrocity, but lets spare all the feelgood BS...The very Boobies in this thread already nailed it: Banks evict deadbeats.  Simple as that.  The entire situation has no moral high-ground.  Bank sucks, mortgage brokers suck, deadbeat "owners" suck, and bailing the banks out instead of lining their CEOs up against a wall sucks.  But no one deserves the least bit of sympathy (much less righteous indignation) in all that.
m00
2014-03-13 06:58:14 PM  
2 votes:

Marcus Aurelius: They had to pay out several bonuses worth of cash to make the charges go away.


Good thing the bailout given to them by taxpayers was big enough, or they'd never be able to afford paying the Government fines for crimes they committed against those same taxpayers.
2014-03-13 05:53:40 PM  
2 votes:
How is it even allowed for a bank to just toss people out of their homes without even showing the Sheriff that they own the damn place at least? I know that the legal system is grossly biased and flawed, but COME THE F*CK ON!!!!
2014-03-13 04:54:22 PM  
2 votes:

Magorn: And I have no doubt that Wells will seek dismissal of this suit precisely on the grounds that they settlement check covered this naughtiness as well.


This issue is behind us.  The banks won.  They are free to do pretty much whatever they like.
2014-03-14 12:23:27 PM  
1 votes:

Loren: Smelly Pirate Hooker: Yeah, it's no big.

http://www.laweekly.com/2013-03-07/news/wells-fargo-typo-victim-dead -l arry-delassus/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2290983/Larry-Delassus-death -E lderly-man-lost-house-Wells-Fargo-TYPO-collapses-dies-court-fighting-b ank-years-on.html

That one is ugly but it's still not a wrongful foreclosure.

suburbanguy: What's your point? Foreclosure is basically using the other party for not fulfilling contract terms. There are specific laws and procedures for foreclosing on someone. You have to have all your t's crossed and your ducks in a row. We're the foreclosed owners wrong for not paying. Absolutely. But the bank has to go through the proper channels to foreclose. Should they be able to go to the judge without proper paperwork? "Just trust us. We don't have the proper paperwork, but we can legally take the property." Just because the debtors are deadbeats, doesn't mean you don't have to show proper cause for foreclosure. The ends don't justify the means.

The point is that they aren't trying to take property that they shouldn't be.

So far every example of an actual problem involves a failure to stop legitimate proceedings when the situation changes, not going after the wrong house in the first place.  Thus rules designed to keep them from going after the wrong property aren't going to do anything.


That's exactly why you're a farker, not a lawyer. Foreclosure procedures are in place to make sure they aren't foreclosing on the wrong person, or improperly on the right one. There are specific steps to take; you can't skip the proper steps of make up your own rules. If you own a repo company, you can't tow somebody's car without the proper authorization. You can't forge authorization or tow without it. Once we skip that step, what's to keep repo men from towing cars they aren't entitled to?

TLDR: This isn't 'Nam; there are rules.
2014-03-14 10:02:43 AM  
1 votes:

PunGent: BMFPitt: BofA didn't need a manual, they just winged it.

BofA, for all their other sins, seems to have been mostly guilty of buying CountryWide...which was sinning plenty on its own, mind you.

Looks like BoA is setting up to pay a pretty big penalty to the government.

/just saying


You know what a fine is called when it's a small percentage of what you're getting fined for illegally obtaining?  A business expense.
2014-03-14 09:31:44 AM  
1 votes:

pla: Look, Wells Fargo et al have attained a level of evil that threatens to depose the very Devil himself.  But TFA ain't the reason.  TFA basically describes them violating a technicality, and not (as TFS makes it sound) Wells Fargo going around evicting random people with no connection to them (spare me the random links to cleanout contractors screwing up - Yes, mistakes happen, get over it).

 These evictions remove people deep under water from overpriced houses with a mortgage they never should have gotten.  If you don't pay Rent-A-Center for your couch, they take it away.  If you don't pay Chrysler your monthly car payment, they take it away.  And if you don't pay your mortgage... Can anyone spot the pattern here?  Right: They take it away.

 The sheer scale of this problem makes it a borderline atrocity, but lets spare all the feelgood BS...The very Boobies in this thread already nailed it: Banks evict deadbeats.  Simple as that.  The entire situation has no moral high-ground.  Bank sucks, mortgage brokers suck, deadbeat "owners" suck, and bailing the banks out instead of lining their CEOs up against a wall sucks.  But no one deserves the least bit of sympathy (much less righteous indignation) in all that.


And innocent homeowners, and people who've never had a mortgage with them, and people who've never missed a payment, and people who the bank can't actually find the paperwork on so they make it up after the fact, and...

Sure, there's a lot of irresponsible deadbeats out there.

Some of them are multi-billion dollar banks.
2014-03-14 09:22:47 AM  
1 votes:

ChicagoKev: d23: Many, many, many people were thrown out of their homes in an illegal way and, if they were lucky, were only paid back a few pennies on the dollar.

I call BS on this claim.

As Loren points out, there are just two cases in this thread where a bank foreclosed when the homeowner was not delinquent.   Two cases out of how many foreclosures?

Yes, you can claim that mortgages were sold and resold and securitized into tranches until the paper trail was murky and it was difficult to demonstrate that the particular bank doing the foreclosure was the "true owner" of the debt.    But was there a debt, and out of the "many many people" who were thrown out, all but two of them missed multiple mortgage payments.

If you  borrow money with a house as collateral then fail to make payments, why act shocked when you are evicted?   You can try to make this about bad paperwork, but in the end, with two exceptions, everybody in foreclosure admittedly borrowed a huge sum of money and stopped making payments.


Also, friends of mine (not clients), WERE making their payments.  Their mortgage company just screwed up recording them.  And, bonus, also forgot to pay their property taxes, which they'd been collecting, and were supposed to pay (common in mortgages).

Their attorney was able to save their house, and their town was very forgiving about the taxes (because, get this...it wasn't an uncommon problem) but still...they'd done NOTHING wrong.

And their bank wasn't even deliberately evil...just screwed up.
2014-03-14 08:03:54 AM  
1 votes:

bunner: Don't worry.  The damage that no heat or cooling or electric power does to these properties easily be ameliorated by whatever sucker buys them to own or flip.  Granite merchants need to eat, too.


My boiler quit working when it was abut 15-20 degrees outside. I called up American Homeshield, and it took them 3 days to find a company to come out. The guy they sent out didn't work on boilers, only modern furnaces, so it farked around with it for an hour and decided he couldn't do it, so they'd have to send someone else from his company out  the next day. That guy worked on it for two hours and then said he needed to order a part, collected the check and left. Day 4 I get a call from AHS saying *that* guy couldn't fix it and they were trying to find another company to come out. Apparently there was only the one company in a 50 mile radius that would still work with them. Day 6 they tell me they still can't find anyone and I could get my own company out there and get (hopefully. I'm still waiting) reembursed. Finally I get someone out, who gets it running in 30 minutes, but we discover that the water pipe to the glassed-in porch had busted a weld underneith.

Soon as AHS hears 'pipe busted' they're like "Yeah, we don't cover stuff that happens due to the weather". I tried to explain that the pipe only froze because of their failure to get someone out to my property to fix the issue for a week. (And that failure was due to everyone hating them due to their business practices). The guy told me "We are under no obligation to provide service in a timely manner" Then what the fark am I paying you for?

They also didn't want to pay for the inital service because 'frozen pipe'. I had to fight with the guy for half an hour trying to explain that turing the heat on in the house was a seperate issue from the porch. Guy says "The house is connected to that pipe, and if the pipe froze, we don't cover that" I told him that the heater guy isolated the porch from the rest of the house with the cut-off vavle. He says "We don't cover pipe isolation" "What? He just pulled a valve handle while he was diagnosing the boiler! There was no big process, just pulling the handle" "Sorry, we don't cover the valve isolation. We will only cover the diagnosis fee" "Um okay...sure." I made sure the guy didn't put "pulled valve handle' on the work sheet.

/end rant
2014-03-13 09:23:29 PM  
1 votes:

bunner: There's always somebody who would rather eat as a lap dog than starve with the rest of the prisoners.  There's always somebody who never read about Milgram.

Warren Buffet said "There is a class war.  And our class is winning."


So what leverages could we possibly have against multi-billionires?


Stop feeding them 3.99 at a time, every day, every 10 minutes whenever and wherever you can.  Leviathans are filter feeders.  And every nickel you hand them makes them fat.   And ever dollar you don't puts a wrench in their sh*t.  There is no other movement available.  There is no other revolution at hand that wont get us killed.  Vote with your wallets.  That, for now, IS the revolution.  And if it's just a tad too inconvenient, shut the f*ck up and stop whining.


Nice if they can be avoided.  Goldman, JPMC & friends, continue to work the money as product angle whenever & wherever they can.  My most recent favorite was their slipping through the regulatory needle's eye on Bank Holding Companies.  They became the silent, controlling partners of the London Metals Exchange (outside of U.S. reg. control) and, though the LEM only had a hold on 5% of the can aluminum market, were able to gouge the manufacturers that required can aluminum (soda & beer CO.s for instance) by holding up the physical product already purchased through contract (warehoused & only released if a premium was ponied up) and, when the manufacturers attempted to buy directly from aluminium metal producers, they discovered the the LEM was already offering those entities more than the can manufacturers already owed on their LEM contracts (including the premium for `storage'), an interesting hearing. the testimony of Tim Weiner, the Global Risk Manager of Commodities and Metals for MillerCoors  is a good place to start:   http://www.banking.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?FuseAction=Files.View& F ileStore_id=9b58c670-f002-42a9-b673-54e4e05e876e
Do everything to avoid their machinations - then sit back, put up your feet, pop open a cold one and they'll still be nicking you on that beer...

Gramm, Leach, Bliley gets an Enron loophole & Gramm's wife becomes an exec. at Enron.  Rep. Billy Tauzin, R LA, steered Medicare Part D through the House (no discount for you, Uncle Sam).  So, Dallas Fed. estimates that Part D added 17 trillion onto long term debt, which is 3 trillion more than unfunded portion of Social Security will be owed over the next 75yrs.  Tauzin took a million a year job as boss of big pharma's primary lobbying org., Greenspan was encouraged to invoke the 1994 HOEPA, which would have shut down the unregulated mortgage originators' and the subsequent repackaging of the rotted spawn, upstream, but Greenspan was the `sophisticate's' tool, etc.

Only way to disrupt the game is to grass root (for) a Constitutional Amendment that requires Public Only financing of all elections, and Requires absolute transparency of all lobbying of elected/appointed officials (no meetings/trans of info that isn't posted up within 24hrs of mtg./receipt of `suggested' legislation) with mandatory 5 yr. minimum for any `lack of clarity'.
2014-03-13 08:34:42 PM  
1 votes:

d23: Many, many, many people were thrown out of their homes in an illegal way and, if they were lucky, were only paid back a few pennies on the dollar.


I call BS on this claim.

As Loren points out, there are just two cases in this thread where a bank foreclosed when the homeowner was not delinquent.   Two cases out of how many foreclosures?

Yes, you can claim that mortgages were sold and resold and securitized into tranches until the paper trail was murky and it was difficult to demonstrate that the particular bank doing the foreclosure was the "true owner" of the debt.    But was there a debt, and out of the "many many people" who were thrown out, all but two of them missed multiple mortgage payments.

If you  borrow money with a house as collateral then fail to make payments, why act shocked when you are evicted?   You can try to make this about bad paperwork, but in the end, with two exceptions, everybody in foreclosure admittedly borrowed a huge sum of money and stopped making payments.
2014-03-13 07:43:56 PM  
1 votes:
You want something other than complaints?

Open notepad.


Buy things you can afford without loans as much as possible.  Skip big ticket items you can't afford unless they are necessary to your survival.  Pay all your credit cards down to nilch and stop using them.   Maintain your home and car out of cash on hand.  Shop locally and spend the extra 2 to 4% to support something other than an 757 hangars full of Chinese crap.  Source locally.  Put your money on the counters where local owners hire local workers.  Get the lowest possible useful insurance premiums.  Stop eating at fast food restaurants.  Avoid any and all loans or credit when possible.  Get your tech, cars, clthing and household items from local resale as much as possible.  Buy gas at indie stations.  Give as littel money to the utility companies as possible.  And don't stop doing it.  When they piss and moan about "shrinking profits", do it more and then sue them class action when the rates go up and the product stays the same.


ta da.
2014-03-13 07:20:51 PM  
1 votes:

MassAsster: I'm still amazed how how many people continue to give these banks business. If you want change, stop using them!


So, if you stop feeding rabid animals, they starve?  Whooda thunk.,
2014-03-13 07:19:38 PM  
1 votes:
I'm still amazed how how many people continue to give these banks business. If you want change, stop using them!
2014-03-13 06:39:55 PM  
1 votes:

ZAZ: Nothing in the article says Wells Fargo was doing anything worse than throwing out deadbeats. It is consistent with the bank acting on primarily based on MERS records and checking paperwork only when paperwork is requested. The big banks can afford lawyers who know better than to create an actually incriminating document, as opposed to one that reporters can imagine is incriminating.


Yeah, notably missing from this whole mess are substantial cases of innocents being foreclosed on.  To date I'm aware of only one case that has stood up to scrutiny and that involved a failure to stop the foreclosure after a short sale rather than an errant foreclosure.  Everything else I've seen has either been notifications to people other than the one being foreclosed on or address errors by the cleanout companies.  Keeping focusing on making the banks jump through hoops does nothing about the cleanout companies.

Marcus Aurelius: If you don't have a mortgage, then there's nothing to worry about.

http://www.salon.com/2013/05/02/the_foreclosure_fraud_settlement_was _a _big_dud/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/16/illegal-foreclosures_n_1283 46 7.html
http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2013/06/13/2150391/wells-fargo-sold -t his-womans-house-in-foreclosure-even-though-she-paid-up/
http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?id=9246636
http://news.firedoglake.com/2012/09/07/foreclosure-fraud-chaos-banks -i llegally-break-and-enter-destroy-wrong-house-again/


Oh?  Article #1--it's about paperwork.  #2--paperwork.  #3--ok, another failed to stop.  She came up with the money at the last instant, the process didn't get stopped.  #4--they weren't actually paying although it was supposedly some sort of paperwork problem.  #5--wrong address by the cleanout guys--the very problem I'm saying is the actual issue here.
2014-03-13 06:18:05 PM  
1 votes:

ZAZ: Nothing in the article says Wells Fargo was doing anything worse than throwing out deadbeats. It is consistent with the bank acting on primarily based on MERS records and checking paperwork only when paperwork is requested. The big banks can afford lawyers who know better than to create an actually incriminating document, as opposed to one that reporters can imagine is incriminating.

I have mentioned before some corporate antitrust training I had to go through. It taught us how to avoid creating evidence that would look bad in court. It had nothing to do with avoiding antitrust violations. Any anticompetitive policies were defined and implemented by top management, not ordinary cubicle occupants. I'm sure there is a similar division in Wells Fargo. You have the people who decide whether the company is evil, and you have other people who make sure all the paperwork describes a company that stays on the right side of the law.



We know how the system is supposed to work. But suppose to and does are different.
2014-03-13 06:15:23 PM  
1 votes:
My mother runs into situations like ZAZ is in. She's a government accountant. People will ask questions about government accounting and she'll tell them all about the procedures and best practices and reasoning. Then they'll act all shocked and ask her how she can sleep at night. She says "I don't do that stuff. It's evil. I'm not saying it's morally defensible; I was answering your question."
2014-03-13 06:13:30 PM  
1 votes:

rkiller1: [www.destgulch.com image 600x327]
Fargo


All that for a little bit of money. There's more to life than a little money, you know. Don'tcha know that, Wells Fargo?
2014-03-13 06:10:43 PM  
1 votes:

ZAZ: Nothing in the article says Wells Fargo was doing anything worse than throwing out deadbeats. It is consistent with the bank acting on primarily based on MERS records and checking paperwork only when paperwork is requested. The big banks can afford lawyers who know better than to create an actually incriminating document, as opposed to one that reporters can imagine is incriminating.

I have mentioned before some corporate antitrust training I had to go through. It taught us how to avoid creating evidence that would look bad in court. It had nothing to do with avoiding antitrust violations. Any anticompetitive policies were defined and implemented by top management, not ordinary cubicle occupants. I'm sure there is a similar division in Wells Fargo. You have the people who decide whether the company is evil, and you have other people who make sure all the paperwork describes a company that stays on the right side of the law.


Way to inform that you are very much one of those people that are part of the problem.

Better to be the right hand of the devil than in his path, eh?
2014-03-13 06:05:31 PM  
1 votes:
Too big to fail.
2014-03-13 06:05:12 PM  
1 votes:

ecmoRandomNumbers: ZAZ: Nothing in the article says Wells Fargo was doing anything worse than throwing out deadbeats. It is consistent with the bank acting on primarily based on MERS records and checking paperwork only when paperwork is requested. The big banks can afford lawyers who know better than to create an actually incriminating document, as opposed to one that reporters can imagine is incriminating.

I have mentioned before some corporate antitrust training I had to go through. It taught us how to avoid creating evidence that would look bad in court. It had nothing to do with avoiding antitrust violations. Any anticompetitive policies were defined and implemented by top management, not ordinary cubicle occupants. I'm sure there is a similar division in Wells Fargo. You have the people who decide whether the company is evil, and you have other people who make sure all the paperwork describes a company that stays on the right side of the law.

I can't tell you how much faith in the system that gives me.


You shouldn't have any faith in the system. It's all just a big con from start to finish.
2014-03-13 05:59:16 PM  
1 votes:

TV's Vinnie: How is it even allowed for a bank to just toss people out of their homes without even showing the Sheriff that they own the damn place at least? I know that the legal system is grossly biased and flawed, but COME THE F*CK ON!!!!


Calm down. They're only allowed to do that to poor people.
 
Displayed 32 of 32 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report