If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(WABE Atlanta)   Morehouse College is under endowed   (wabe.org) divider line 33
    More: Ironic, Morehouse College, Morehouse, Dr. Wilson, historically black colleges  
•       •       •

4440 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2014 at 1:32 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-03-13 01:31:50 PM
Positive racism is still racism, subby.
 
2014-03-13 01:33:40 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: Positive racism is still racism, subby.


F*ck you, it's funny.
 
2014-03-13 01:34:38 PM
Morehouse? More like Lesshouse! Amiright???
 
2014-03-13 01:36:28 PM
Caught that on the way in on the radio.  Pretty funny ...
 
2014-03-13 01:37:23 PM
Under endowed?

Like a lot of colleges these days, they're flat busted.
(that's broke! No bread!)
 
2014-03-13 01:39:02 PM

mediad.publicbroadcasting.net

Frowns upon Farkers shenanigans

 
2014-03-13 01:40:20 PM
Morehouse and Spellman, and maybe Howard are the only historically black colleges left with any cachet.  The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.
 
2014-03-13 01:41:02 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: Positive racism is still racism, subby.



Meh. After futher review, the call is overturned. Subby gets the ball back at the original line of scrimmage.


/If I have to deal with being called a lazy criminal, at least let the ladies know that I have something to offer.
 
2014-03-13 01:43:32 PM
I decided to go to Hillman College instead.
 
2014-03-13 01:44:59 PM
Morehouse is in the Poorhouse.
 
2014-03-13 01:45:57 PM
ok, i lol'd.
 
2014-03-13 01:46:27 PM

FLMountainMan: The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.


I'm not trying to assume too much, but in the most non-accusatory manner I can muster - what is that supposed to mean?

It's unclear to me.
 
2014-03-13 01:49:17 PM
Do they admit other races or just one race?
 
2014-03-13 01:49:43 PM

Pangea: FLMountainMan: The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.

I'm not trying to assume too much, but in the most non-accusatory manner I can muster - what is that supposed to mean?

It's unclear to me.



I just decided to leave it alone. I'm not in the mood for any ridiculous justifications for bigotry, masked as logical thought.
 
2014-03-13 01:49:54 PM
What about Morehead State?
 
2014-03-13 01:53:21 PM

Day_Old_Dutchie: Under endowed?

Like a lot of colleges these days, they're flat busted.
(that's broke! No bread!)


blog.ourstage.com


Got some really funny comments in this thread.  Ray approves.
 
2014-03-13 02:08:11 PM

svanmeter: Do they admit other races or just one race?


They admit all races. In the case of state schools that are historically black, if you're another race you can get a minority scholarship. I know a couple of white people who attended Alabama State on minority scholarships. Unfortunately many of the historically black colleges have really poor academics. Morehouse and Spelman have good academic reputations but go someplace like Arkansas-Pine Bluff and you're not going to get much for your money.
 
2014-03-13 02:27:58 PM
I ain't been to Morehouse, ain't been to no house...
 
2014-03-13 02:32:29 PM

DROxINxTHExWIND: Pangea: FLMountainMan: The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.

I'm not trying to assume too much, but in the most non-accusatory manner I can muster - what is that supposed to mean?

It's unclear to me.


I just decided to leave it alone. I'm not in the mood for any ridiculous justifications for bigotry, masked as logical thought.


So I'm bigoted for not seeing why segregated schools should still exist?  No, instead let's all pine for the good ol' days, when high-achieving black kids were stuck going to an all-black school because we wouldn't want them around white coeds.
 
2014-03-13 02:35:53 PM

svanmeter: Do they admit other races or just one race?


I'm pretty sure they only admit humans. They may take time to break them into smaller subdivisions, though.
 
2014-03-13 02:41:22 PM

EngineerAU: svanmeter: Do they admit other races or just one race?

They admit all races. In the case of state schools that are historically black, if you're another race you can get a minority scholarship. I know a couple of white people who attended Alabama State on minority scholarships. Unfortunately many of the historically black colleges have really poor academics. Morehouse and Spelman have good academic reputations but go someplace like Arkansas-Pine Bluff and you're not going to get much for your money.


I don't believe all states offer minority scholarships for whites and asians at black schools.  Pretty sure Florida doesn't.  In spite of that, FAMU, in Florida, is integrating more and more.  The pharmacy school is pretty good, so it's attracting some white and asian kids.  The golf team was, at one point, all white, which caused a bit of an uproar.  The last two quarterbacks have been white, several baseball players are white, etc...
 
2014-03-13 02:47:41 PM

Pangea: FLMountainMan: The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.

I'm not trying to assume too much, but in the most non-accusatory manner I can muster - what is that supposed to mean?

I understood it to mean:

1. Black students were often excluded from admission at public colleges due to racist admission policies.
2. HBCUs were created to provide these students with a good education.
3. Nevertheless, all other things being equal, black students would prefer to attend a public college over a HBCU if possible.
4. Racist admission policies are less prevalent these days.
5. Therefore, more black students are being admitted to quality public colleges, and thus do not need to attend HCBUs to get a good education.
6. HBCUs are therefore suffering from lower enrollment of quality students.
7. Lower enrollment at HBCUs is a "good thing" because it evidences decreased racism in public institutions.

Now, you can legitimately disagree with some of those fundamental assumptions (# 2 and # 3 are particularly problematic), and disagree entirely with the conclusion, but I don't read what FLMountainMan wrote as being purposefully troll-y. Just misinformed.

Also, I was marveling a bit at the number of things you would need to know to understand the joke in the headline. Imagine trying to explain it to a non-English speaking non-American.
 
2014-03-13 02:51:43 PM
Think that's bad? Morse Science High School has disappeared!
 
2014-03-13 02:51:50 PM

svanmeter: Do they admit other races or just one race?


Yeah.  That's why they're called "Historically Black Colleges" these days and not "All Black Colleges."
 
2014-03-13 03:10:00 PM
Sheeit!
(golly)
 
2014-03-13 03:16:43 PM

Uzzah: Pangea: FLMountainMan: The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.

I'm not trying to assume too much, but in the most non-accusatory manner I can muster - what is that supposed to mean?
I understood it to mean:

1. Black students were often excluded from admission at public colleges due to racist admission policies.
2. HBCUs were created to provide these students with a good education.
3. Nevertheless, all other things being equal, black students would prefer to attend a public college over a HBCU if possible.
4. Racist admission policies are less prevalent these days.
5. Therefore, more black students are being admitted to quality public colleges, and thus do not need to attend HCBUs to get a good education.
6. HBCUs are therefore suffering from lower enrollment of quality students.
7. Lower enrollment at HBCUs is a "good thing" because it evidences decreased racism in public institutions.

Now, you can legitimately disagree with some of those fundamental assumptions (# 2 and # 3 are particularly problematic), and disagree entirely with the conclusion, but I don't read what FLMountainMan wrote as being purposefully troll-y. Just misinformed.

Also, I was marveling a bit at the number of things you would need to know to understand the joke in the headline. Imagine trying to explain it to a non-English speaking non-American.


That's a good answer, and helps reorient my thinking on the subject.
 
2014-03-13 03:26:30 PM
i.chzbgr.com
 
2014-03-13 03:48:21 PM

Uzzah: Pangea: FLMountainMan: The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.

I'm not trying to assume too much, but in the most non-accusatory manner I can muster - what is that supposed to mean?
I understood it to mean:

1. Black students were often excluded from admission at public colleges due to racist admission policies.
2. HBCUs were created to provide these students with a good education.
3. Nevertheless, all other things being equal, black students would prefer to attend a public college over a HBCU if possible.
4. Racist admission policies are less prevalent these days.
5. Therefore, more black students are being admitted to quality public colleges, and thus do not need to attend HCBUs to get a good education.
6. HBCUs are therefore suffering from lower enrollment of quality students.
7. Lower enrollment at HBCUs is a "good thing" because it evidences decreased racism in public institutions.

Now, you can legitimately disagree with some of those fundamental assumptions (# 2 and # 3 are particularly problematic), and disagree entirely with the conclusion, but I don't read what FLMountainMan wrote as being purposefully troll-y. Just misinformed.


I don't see how it's misinformed, but yes, what you wrote is what I intended.  Although I'd quibble a little over #7 - I'd clarify that their is decreased racism against black students in admissions.

Actually, Florida State and FAMU provide a pretty interesting study of this.  Both located in the same city, both pull from the same geographic area.  A black male enrolled at FSU has a 70% chance of graduating in six years or less.  A black male enrolled at FAMU has around a 35% chance of graduating in six years or less. This is due to a lot of factors, but the most important one is that the average black male enrolling at FSU has a better academic profile than the average black male enrolling at FAMU and is therefore more likely to succeed in college.

Why do you think I'm misinformed?
 
2014-03-13 04:14:08 PM

FLMountainMan: Uzzah: Pangea: FLMountainMan: The rest are pretty much resigned to taking kids that couldn't get into their states' good to average schools.  Which is, all things considered, a good sign.

I'm not trying to assume too much, but in the most non-accusatory manner I can muster - what is that supposed to mean?
I understood it to mean:

1. Black students were often excluded from admission at public colleges due to racist admission policies.
2. HBCUs were created to provide these students with a good education.
3. Nevertheless, all other things being equal, black students would prefer to attend a public college over a HBCU if possible.
4. Racist admission policies are less prevalent these days.
5. Therefore, more black students are being admitted to quality public colleges, and thus do not need to attend HCBUs to get a good education.
6. HBCUs are therefore suffering from lower enrollment of quality students.
7. Lower enrollment at HBCUs is a "good thing" because it evidences decreased racism in public institutions.

Now, you can legitimately disagree with some of those fundamental assumptions (# 2 and # 3 are particularly problematic), and disagree entirely with the conclusion, but I don't read what FLMountainMan wrote as being purposefully troll-y. Just misinformed.

I don't see how it's misinformed, but yes, what you wrote is what I intended.  Although I'd quibble a little over #7 - I'd clarify that their is decreased racism against black students in admissions.

Actually, Florida State and FAMU provide a pretty interesting study of this.  Both located in the same city, both pull from the same geographic area.  A black male enrolled at FSU has a 70% chance of graduating in six years or less.  A black male enrolled at FAMU has around a 35% chance of graduating in six years or less. This is due to a lot of factors, but the most important one is that the average black male enrolling at FSU has a better academic profile than the average black male enrolling at FAMU and is ...


I'm going to guess that some people believe that you believe that HBCUs are exclusively black. There is actually one HBCU in Tennessee that has a majority white student population... So much so that some misguided white students petitioned to have the school stripped of it's HBCU status. Which is beyond stupid.

People seem to forget the H in HBCU, and how important it is to understanding the mission and culture of the universities. I graduated from an HBCU, as did both of my sisters and both of my parents. My sisters and I all attended one of the schools that our parents had attended. Like it was a tradition... to attend the same school as your parents. Have you heard of that tradition? Well, we did that. Lots of people do that. Black people included. So, for that reason many black people continue to attend HBCUs... not because they couldn't get in anywhere else. I had choices.

Like the majority of students at an HBCU, I worked my entire tenure in the university. That tends to be a matter of survival, not choice. And working while attending university has a much heavier impact on graduation rates than high school academic performance.
 
2014-03-13 04:51:53 PM

FLMountainMan: Uzzah:

2. HBCUs were created to provide these students with a good education.
3. Nevertheless, all other things being equal, black students would prefer to attend a public college over a HBCU if possible.

Now, you can legitimately disagree with some of those fundamental assumptions (# 2 and # 3 are particularly problematic), and disagree entirely with the conclusion, but I don't read what FLMountainMan wrote as being purposefully troll-y. Just misinformed.

I don't see how it's misinformed, but yes, what you wrote is what I intended.  Although I'd quibble a little over #7 - I'd clarify that their is decreased racism against black students in admissions.

Why do you think I'm misinformed?


#2 is a gross oversimplification of the history of HBCUs. Many of them started as elementary/secondary (i.e. high school) or trade schools, not as universities. It wasn't until about the 1930s or so that many of them even attempted to offer collegiate-level education (mostly intended to teach blacks to be teachers, so that they could staff segregated black schools), and it wasn't until well into the postwar era that they began to approximate traditional colleges with broad offerings in liberal arts and science education. If you only start looking at an HBCU as of, say 1970, you might conceive of it as being created in response to racism at the collegiate admissions level, but their history is a lot more complicated and nuanced than that.

#3 is the bigger issue: it's hard to make any categorical pronouncements like "black students would prefer an integrated school over an HBCU" or vice versa. There are a lot of reasons why a black student would choose an integrated school over a HBCU, and a lot of reasons why another black student might prefer the latter, even where a quality integrated school is available. Social life issues, curriculum specialization, learning styles, reputation, and about a million other things influence that decision for every potential student. If it helps, draw the analogy to religious colleges -- although quality students at those colleges could pursue the same studies at a secular college, they choose to attend a religiously-segregated institution for various personal reasons.

It may be that, at the margins, diminished racism at integrated schools is contributing somewhat to the decline in enrollment at HBCUs. But I think the majority of that decline is driven by other issues. Just as one (seemingly oblique) example, remember that HBCUs had a hugely enhanced visibility back in the '80s and early '90s, with Bill Cosby prominently wearing various HBCU sweatshirts on "The Cosby Show" and the popular spin-off, "A Different World," being set at a fictional HBCU. Since those shows went off the air, HBCUs haven't had anywhere near that kind of visibility on the national level.  Black students from California or North Dakota were often induced to investigate places like Spellman College or Bethune-Cookman after hearing Cliff Huxtable encourage his kids to go there; those same students today might not ever have those names cross their radar at all, much less with an endorsement from a cherished public figure.
 
2014-03-13 05:12:39 PM
Some of what keeps students from Morehouse is crime.  The neighborhood around the campus is really really bad.
 
2014-03-14 02:33:44 AM
BRAVO; I do not generally login, so that you should make subby feel great.
 
2014-03-14 01:18:06 PM
Yes, he may be under endowed now but in the future...

img.fark.net
 
Displayed 33 of 33 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report