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(BBC-US)   Whoops, I guess she had diplomatic immunity after all   (bbc.com) divider line 15
    More: Followup, visa fraud, diplomats  
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18598 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2014 at 1:56 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Funniest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-03-13 02:03:14 PM
6 votes:
i184.photobucket.com
2014-03-13 02:06:40 PM
3 votes:

nmrsnr: AverageAmericanGuy: My understanding is that the police in America can do anything they want and resisting them is illegal. The only recourse you have is to sue them after the fact.


This is just plain false. Why do people conflate capability with authority? It's like saying "my understanding is that in America people can break into your house, beat you up, and steal your stuff. The only recourse you have is to press charges against them afterwards."


i43.tinypic.com
2014-03-13 02:05:06 PM
2 votes:

ZAZ: Suits against somebody with diplomatic immunity can not be maintained until after immunity is lost. She got temporary immunity, for one day, as a "counselor" to the UN. That day was enough to have charges temporarily dropped. She can be re-indicted now that she does not have immunity.

I am tempted to expel the UN as too much trouble, but I imagine American intelligence agencies like having all those people under surveillance.


the U.N. didn't grant her the immunity... the U.S. state department colluded with the Indian foreign ministry and used the U.N. as a cover to do what they wanted. So outrage here should be based on whether you like State more than the NY prosecutor's office on this issue. But clearly, under Obama, State showed weakness by giving into India's stupidity on this issue and emboldened Putin to take over Crimea.
2014-03-13 05:57:03 PM
1 votes:

Dr Dreidel: No, we shouldn't. Hey, I'm all for preserving dignity as much as possible, but when you're processed into a detention center, they absolutely should strip-search you to find and remove weapons and contraband, but also so that everyone knows exactly what condition you were in when you got there.


I think that, if we would just pass some laws banning weapons from jail facilities, the problem will pretty much solve itself and any sort of searches will be redundant and therefore unnecessary.
2014-03-13 03:36:51 PM
1 votes:

ZAZ: I am tempted to expel the UN as too much trouble, but I imagine American intelligence agencies like having all those people under surveillance.


We just need your go ahead Internet Bosley, we can have them all liquidated at your signal.  Was that a nod?

Stop stretching your neck in a circular motion, it's farking everything up.
2014-03-13 03:34:15 PM
1 votes:
Apparently she did not curry much favor while here.
2014-03-13 03:00:56 PM
1 votes:
I honestly dont know why this was even an issue.
The worker was not an US citizen. Why in the world would we expect an Indian citizen to pay another Indian citizen US wages just because they are in the US working as an agent of their government.
Stupid. The cost of labor is so cheap over there the person was probably happy to have a freaking job.
2014-03-13 02:55:58 PM
1 votes:

nmrsnr: liam76: nmrsnr: Police can't do whatever they want, and you are legally allowed to stop them from doing anything outside the scope of their authority

No you aren't.

If they come to your door and say "Police, let us in" you are legally allowed to say "not without a warrant" and refuse to open the door for them. That is legally stopping them from doing something outside the scope of their authority. I never said you can physically restrain them if they do enter, or open fire on them if they refuse to leave.


Oooh shifting goal-posts. Haven't seen that in a while on fark.
2014-03-13 02:52:49 PM
1 votes:
journalbd.com
I'd examine her diplomatic pouch
2014-03-13 02:34:18 PM
1 votes:

Molavian: Nana's Vibrator: Molavian: [i184.photobucket.com image 280x180]

[www.screeninsults.com image 557x262]

[i184.photobucket.com image 300x179]


2.bp.blogspot.com
2014-03-13 02:32:39 PM
1 votes:
FTFA: "This is the happiest moment of our lives. I have always maintained that this entire issue was a lie. The work done by our foreign affairs ministry is admirable," Mr Khobragade told BBC Hindi.

You DO understand that your daughter wasn't acquitted of the crime she was accused of right? The "happiest moment of your life" is the day you were able to game the system to get your evil spawn off on a technicality?

Please remember that some filthy Americans got to stare at your precious daughter's junk. Nothing your foreign affairs ministry can do about that.
2014-03-13 02:22:17 PM
1 votes:

Tax Boy: she didn't have diplomatic immunity when she allegedly committed the crime or when she was arrested.

India changed her job position immediately (like an hour before) her indictment to one that had diplomatic immunity. She subsequently left the country.

Of course, now the US government is going to declare her persona non grata and make it really difficult (if not impossible) for her to enter the US where her american husband and children are citizens. so sucks to be her i suppose.


I'm sure she's okay.  Good help is so hard to find these days, even in India
2014-03-13 02:21:12 PM
1 votes:

Nana's Vibrator: Molavian: [i184.photobucket.com image 280x180]

[www.screeninsults.com image 557x262]


i184.photobucket.com
2014-03-13 02:10:41 PM
1 votes:

Molavian: [i184.photobucket.com image 280x180]


www.screeninsults.com
2014-03-13 02:00:24 PM
1 votes:
She looks just like a manager where I worked.  What a lunatic biatch.
 
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