Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Softpedia)   Proving that technology is getting smaller and smarter like a math class full of Chinese exchange students, more than 100 new satellites to be launched into earth orbit, each one the size of a postage stamp   (news.softpedia.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, CubeSat, Chinese, satellites, Timeline of Solar System exploration, Dragon capsules, Commercial Orbital Transportation Services, ionosphere, cubic centimetres  
•       •       •

1112 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Mar 2014 at 9:58 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2014-03-13 10:20:02 AM  
img.pandawhale.com

/Sorry, had to do it, subby
 
2014-03-13 10:22:28 AM  
What is this "postage stamp" of which you speak?
 
2014-03-13 10:22:42 AM  
Just what we need, more clutter in orbit.
 
2014-03-13 10:32:46 AM  

Bluestone: Just what we need, more clutter in orbit.


Yea, didn't we have a link yesterday about how to get rid of all this junk?
 
2014-03-13 10:58:50 AM  
scriptshadow.net
 
2014-03-13 11:20:06 AM  
We're launching Chinese math students into space?
 
2014-03-13 11:25:34 AM  

Bluestone: Just what we need, more clutter in orbit.


We do seem to be heading to where Earth will have a set of rings to rival Saturn soon.
 
2014-03-13 12:40:29 PM  
So do these things have their own attitude control like real satellites do, or are they basically just débris with a transmitter rubber-banded on?
 
2014-03-13 12:53:33 PM  

abb3w: Bluestone: Just what we need, more clutter in orbit.

We do seem to be heading to where Earth will have a set of rings to rival Saturn soon.


On the bright (pun intended) side, it should cut down on global warming when half the sun-facing side of the planet can't get sunlight
 
2014-03-13 01:22:27 PM  

Bluestone: Just what we need, more clutter in orbit.



The crew of the Toybox is on it.
 
2014-03-13 01:35:04 PM  

Robo Beat: So do these things have their own attitude control like real satellites do, or are they basically just débris with a transmitter rubber-banded on?


The latter - and it's kind of a bad idea to deploy them from the space station since it means their orbits will intersect on subsequent revs.  I'm guessing that the ballistic coefficient on these things is low enough that they'll decay pretty quickly and not pose a risk for long.
 
2014-03-13 02:22:09 PM  

Lamberts Ho Man: Robo Beat: So do these things have their own attitude control like real satellites do, or are they basically just débris with a transmitter rubber-banded on?

The latter - and it's kind of a bad idea to deploy them from the space station since it means their orbits will intersect on subsequent revs.  I'm guessing that the ballistic coefficient on these things is low enough that they'll decay pretty quickly and not pose a risk for long.


Yep. Even that tool bag dropped after about 9 months. Also, the station is deploying a cubesat that will then deploy the femtosats making an intersection less likely. I'd have to say I'm not a big fan of more crap up there though.
 
2014-03-13 05:20:09 PM  
they are also dedicating the launch to the challenger crew
 
2014-03-13 07:49:14 PM  

Lamberts Ho Man: Robo Beat: So do these things have their own attitude control like real satellites do, or are they basically just débris with a transmitter rubber-banded on?

The latter - and it's kind of a bad idea to deploy them from the space station since it means their orbits will intersect on subsequent revs.  I'm guessing that the ballistic coefficient on these things is low enough that they'll decay pretty quickly and not pose a risk for long.


I'm not positive on this, but I'm fairly confident that they eject the cubesats backwards along the station's orbit, or at least with some retrograde velocity component.  That would put them in an orbit that's tangent to the station's orbit at first, but with a shorter period (so even when they do re-intersect the station's orbit, the station's not there at the time) and lower perigee.  Their lower ballistic coefficient then means that they decay faster than the station does, so the apogee quickly falls below the station's orbit and there's no collision risk.

/Not a rocket scientist.
//But I play one in KSP.
 
2014-03-13 08:58:57 PM  

Arkanaut: We're launching Chinese math students into space?


They must have evolved past the need for oxygen after spending time in Beijing
 
Displayed 15 of 15 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report