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(ABC)   Remember Amazon's "free shipping" for their valued 'prime' customers? Yeah, about that   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 10
    More: Interesting, Amazon  
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6183 clicks; posted to Business » on 12 Mar 2014 at 10:21 PM (31 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-12 08:35:10 PM  
4 votes:
Stephens explained that customers who were not Prime members often received a lower costs for the product and the shipping.
"But together they would roughly equal the cost Amazon is charging Prime members for so-called free shipping," he said.


Well he's right - that's what they do.  I know they do this, because for every product I purchase with Prime Amazon includes a link that says "other sellers may sell this product for less" and includes links to them.  And they always come up within a few cents of the Prime price if you add cost+shipping.

But here's the thing, if I compare the price of a Prime item to another site that isn't Amazon, the cost without shipping is usually the same.  So if I'm looking for a $60 router on Amazon Prime, any of the other 3rd party Amazon sellers might sell a combo cost+shipping that totals $60, but Best Buy or Wal Mart might charge $60+ shipping.

The last example of this I can think of was an accent lamp I ordered that was $102 on Amazon Prime.  All of the Amazon 3rd party sellers came within cents of that including shipping.  Anywhere else I looked for that lamp wouldn't deliver it for under $115 total.

So they are clearly gaming the system, but they might be gaming it to the lowest possible price anywhere.  I'm curious to see if the case goes anywhere.
2014-03-12 10:48:23 PM  
2 votes:
Shipping is never 'free'. It's just already included in the asking price. It has ALWAYS been this way.
2014-03-12 09:42:57 PM  
2 votes:

bdub77: Somewhere out there a class action lawyer's dick is getting really hard.

Or vagina. It could be a lawyer's vagina getting whatever a vagina gets when it's hard. Umm.


i1.ytimg.com
2014-03-13 07:01:54 AM  
1 votes:
Amazon prime offers free two day shipping, not standard. The price comparison she was doing includes standard shipping which is and inferior service to what is included with Prime.
2014-03-13 01:27:24 AM  
1 votes:
I've haven't paid a dime on shipping from Amazon in years and I've never paid for prime either, I just use the free super saver shipping. It's not 2 day, but if I need something that fast I'll just buy it locally.
2014-03-12 11:12:58 PM  
1 votes:
this may be one of the few class action lawsuits I would get a notice for and opt out, not because I want to pursue it on my own but because I like the service the defendant has given me.
2014-03-12 10:34:54 PM  
1 votes:
What kind of annoys me is that cables and a lot of other cheap things have turned into add-on items that require a $25 order before you can get them with Prime. I can kind of understand, but it is still vaguely annoying when I need something small and cheap like Nano-SIM adapters.
2014-03-12 09:25:47 PM  
1 votes:

NickelP: are they saying the same seller charged prime members more or just some others who didn't have prime products charged less? this seems silly if I am understanding right


They are saying that whether or not you were a Prime member, you could get the same product for the same "price+shipping" total.  And they may actually be correct, but the two day guarantee doesn't apply to non-Prime items.  As far as I can tell, that's the only real advantage.  However, as I pointed out in too many words above - that may still be the lowest total you'll spend for an item regardless if you order online.
2014-03-12 09:05:58 PM  
1 votes:
are they saying the same seller charged prime members more or just some others who didn't have prime products charged less? this seems silly if I am understanding right
2014-03-12 08:42:59 PM  
1 votes:

Lsherm: Stephens explained that customers who were not Prime members often received a lower costs for the product and the shipping.
"But together they would roughly equal the cost Amazon is charging Prime members for so-called free shipping," he said.

Well he's right - that's what they do.  I know they do this, because for every product I purchase with Prime Amazon includes a link that says "other sellers may sell this product for less" and includes links to them.  And they always come up within a few cents of the Prime price if you add cost+shipping.

But here's the thing, if I compare the price of a Prime item to another site that isn't Amazon, the cost without shipping is usually the same.  So if I'm looking for a $60 router on Amazon Prime, any of the other 3rd party Amazon sellers might sell a combo cost+shipping that totals $60, but Best Buy or Wal Mart might charge $60+ shipping.

The last example of this I can think of was an accent lamp I ordered that was $102 on Amazon Prime.  All of the Amazon 3rd party sellers came within cents of that including shipping.  Anywhere else I looked for that lamp wouldn't deliver it for under $115 total.

So they are clearly gaming the system, but they might be gaming it to the lowest possible price anywhere.  I'm curious to see if the case goes anywhere.


That's a good explanation. Also, I'd like to add the shipping you are likely to PAY for from other vendors (ultimately paying approximately the same cost as the prime item) would most likely be standard 4-5 days shipping and not 2 day.

I doing my comparison shopping, and have been satisfied with most price deals I get. And I use the streaming service and kindle book borrowing all the time, too.
 
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