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(PennLive)   Like things like parmesan cheese, feta cheese, or even bologna? Those products might lose their names in the United States   (pennlive.com) divider line 20
    More: Interesting, U.S., Greek, greek yogurt, Parma, feta cheese, American Brands, Black Forest, parmesan  
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Archived thread
2014-03-11 09:26:53 PM  
2 votes:
If we had parmesan mozzarella or feta in this country, sure, that'd be annoying.  Seeing as we have only colored and flavored plastic in our supermarkets, I see no reason for outrage.
2014-03-11 09:25:12 PM  
2 votes:
So will the EU give up Manhattans, Long Island Iced Teas, Boston cream pies, Buffalo wings. Philly cheesesteaks, Key Lime pies, New York style pizzas, Mississippi Mud Pies, Monterey Jack cheese, New England clam chowder etc?
2014-03-11 10:48:43 PM  
1 votes:

miss diminutive: So will the EU give up Manhattans, Long Island Iced Teas, Boston cream pies, Buffalo wings. Philly cheesesteaks, Key Lime pies, New York style pizzas, Mississippi Mud Pies, Monterey Jack cheese, New England clam chowder etc?


Lived in Europe for a couple of years. Never ever found these on a menu, so I don't think this is a threat.
2014-03-11 10:20:47 PM  
1 votes:

aerojockey: Suck it, Europe.

You guys had every opportunity to protect your regional names when these products were introduced.

/having said that, I have no objection to getting rid of Kraft Parmesean cheese, that stuff is awful


You can take my Shaky Cheese when you pry it from my cold, dead hands.

/I would, however, support a name change to Shaky Cheese.
2014-03-11 10:10:09 PM  
1 votes:
Well, then, they have to stop ordering cheeseburgers from McDonald's with American Cheese on them. That'll teach them!
2014-03-11 10:09:34 PM  
1 votes:
Why not just put this on it if it is "real"

www.hellenicbrands.gr
2014-03-11 10:03:44 PM  
1 votes:

OgreMagi: TV's Vinnie: OgreMagi: cptjeff: The EU can fark off.

The EU will ban American products in the same category if we don't go along.  For example, if California sparkling wines were labeled "Champagne" or simply said "champagne method", ALL American wines would be banned in the entire EU.

Since when does the EU buy American Cheese or wines? Before he got croaked, Steve Irwin used to campaign & lobby Australian authorities to ban American cheeses from it's shores.

I don't know about our cheese, but California wine is quite popular in Europe.


Which may explain the REAL reason why the EU wineries are whining: to thwart the competition.
2014-03-11 10:02:12 PM  
1 votes:
How about no?

Does no work for you?
2014-03-11 09:59:12 PM  
1 votes:
USA does not import IP restrictions, it exports them.  Don't like it? Don't sign those trade agreements.

/Not from the USA
//Wish more countries would tell the USA to fark off when it comes to their own IP bullcrap
2014-03-11 09:56:25 PM  
1 votes:

ClavellBCMI: Enforce your laws all you want in the EU, just don't export them here (and we will keep our laws over here... hopefully).


Sorry, we have free trade agreements.  They even supersede any US law that could be passed.  Thanks, globalization!
2014-03-11 09:51:22 PM  
1 votes:

OgreMagi: vpb: It would be a good thing if they actually had to taste something like what they are called, but the whole business about having to make it in a certain place seems unreasonable.

When the product name was derived from the location it was created, it makes sense.  Bordeaux is only made in Bordeaux.  Champagne is only made in Champagne.  EU laws are very strict about that.  What do you think would happen if some foreign based company started to market "Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon?  California wine makers would have a shiat fit.


False equivalency.  These are food items where the name describes the qualities of the food as much or more than its place of origin.  "Napa Valley" says nothing about the wine other than where it came from.

A more accurate example was posted above: Buffalo Wings.  What if we started throwing a fit any time someone offered Buffalo Wings that weren't made in Buffalo, New York?  Or Philadelphia Cheesesteak, or New York Strip steaks, or Manhattan the drink, or Long Island Iced Tea, on and on and on.

Look, I get why brand name protection in these cases is important in Europe, because getting Parmesan cheese from Parma is quite possible.  Easy even depending on where you are.  In the US I doubt anyone thinks Parmesan comes from anywhere but the US.  The names have been taken to describe the qualities that the products have, not their place of origin, and changing that is just not going to happen.
2014-03-11 09:50:50 PM  
1 votes:

Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world


I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.
2014-03-11 09:48:36 PM  
1 votes:

dprathbun: I believe Moët & Chandon tried this a couple of decades ago with 'champagne'.  It didn't work out too well with the hoi polloi, but Moët  did not surrender!  They still does not use that word on their own sparkling wines.

I'm all for it.  Stop calling stuff something that it's not just because it sounds good.


No, they use "champagne" because you can only say that if it comes from Champagne. And here's their label for proof.
www.southernwine.com
2014-03-11 09:40:25 PM  
1 votes:
So what? They'll just add a "-style" next to the name and it's all legal again.

thriftytexan.com
2014-03-11 09:37:20 PM  
1 votes:

doyner: If we had parmesan mozzarella or feta in this country, sure, that'd be annoying.  Seeing as we have only colored and flavored plastic in our supermarkets, I see no reason for outrage.


I guess you've never shopped at Wegmans
2014-03-11 09:37:01 PM  
1 votes:
Again?

/ also, just add the word American in front of each of the products. Such as; American Bologna. They won't be able to say shiat.
2014-03-11 09:36:22 PM  
1 votes:
Enforce your laws all you want in the EU, just don't export them here (and we will keep our laws over here... hopefully).
2014-03-11 09:35:18 PM  
1 votes:

vpb: It would be a good thing if they actually had to taste something like what they are called, but the whole business about having to make it in a certain place seems unreasonable.


When the product name was derived from the location it was created, it makes sense.  Bordeaux is only made in Bordeaux.  Champagne is only made in Champagne.  EU laws are very strict about that.  What do you think would happen if some foreign based company started to market "Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon?  California wine makers would have a shiat fit.
2014-03-11 09:35:00 PM  
1 votes:
Freedom Cheese Powdery
Freedom Cheese Crumbly
Freedom Meat Slicey

Done.
2014-03-11 09:34:48 PM  
1 votes:

doyner: If we had parmesan mozzarella or feta in this country, sure, that'd be annoying.  Seeing as we have only colored and flavored plastic in our supermarkets, I see no reason for outrage.


I don't know about where you live, but I've never had any trouble finding parmigiano reggiano in the US.
 
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