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(PennLive)   Like things like parmesan cheese, feta cheese, or even bologna? Those products might lose their names in the United States   (pennlive.com) divider line 192
    More: Interesting, U.S., Greek, greek yogurt, Parma, feta cheese, American Brands, Black Forest, parmesan  
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192 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-03-11 10:15:25 PM  

Gunny Highway: doyner: Gunny Highway: Order it online.

[media2.giphy.com image 245x285]

It isnt possible to order cheese online?


Un-aged cheese cannot be shipped across state lines.
 
2014-03-11 10:15:28 PM  
Chill out. We already have a set of rules in the US defining what a product must be like to be sold under the name. It's called Standards of Identity for food. It already defines what qualities the product must have, like for example ice cream, mayo etc. etc. The production location could be just another quality.
 
2014-03-11 10:16:43 PM  

catzies: dprathbun: I believe Moët & Chandon tried this a couple of decades ago with 'champagne'.  It didn't work out too well with the hoi polloi, but Moët  did not surrender!  They still does not use that word on their own sparkling wines.

I'm all for it.  Stop calling stuff something that it's not just because it sounds good.

No, they use "champagne" because you can only say that if it comes from Champagne. And here's their label for proof.
[www.southernwine.com image 714x356]


Yup, definitely says "champaign".  I usually buy a bottle of the Rosé every year for New Year's...easily my favorite.
 
2014-03-11 10:16:53 PM  

meat0918: Gunny Highway: doyner: Gunny Highway: Order it online.

[media2.giphy.com image 245x285]

It isnt possible to order cheese online?

Un-aged cheese cannot be shipped across state lines.


Well, there you go. Interesting.

I wish there was a goofy Taylor Swift GIF for that.
 
2014-03-11 10:17:58 PM  

Apatheist: brap: My Oscar has a first name, it's O-S-C-A-R!
My Oscar has a second name, it's M-A-Y-E-R!

*ring!*

Hello?

Yes, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, I will immediately cease and desist on the use of your trademarked name.

GOT DAMMIT!

My processed meat discs have a first name it's the artist formerly known as O-S-C-A-R

My processed meat discs have a second name it's.....that's it, I QUIT

Is this the pirate community's version of "thanks, Obama"? I mean, the way you injected the Academy in there, likely intending to refer to the MPAA (neither of which would be the one sending C&Ds), and conflated copyright law with trademark law a la Dumb Starbucks...it was rather amazing.

/ 9/10


You do realize that AMPAS is the one that holds the trademark on the Oscar ceremony and statues, not the MPAA, and they're very persistant in protecting that trademark.
 
2014-03-11 10:18:02 PM  

vpb: It would be a good thing if they actually had to taste something like what they are called, but the whole business about having to make it in a certain place seems unreasonable.


There is nothing unreasonable about insisting that products named for a place actually be made in that place.

The worst thing about TFA is choosing to illustrate it with a can or Kraft "parmigiano". The stuff that Kraft makes bears no resemblance with actual parmigiano, their use of the name is a strong argument in favour of the EU's position.


Jim_Callahan: ...but where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world.

So, it is your belief that the US is feeding the EU ?

.
 
2014-03-11 10:19:03 PM  

Gunny Highway: meat0918: Gunny Highway: doyner: Gunny Highway: Order it online.

[media2.giphy.com image 245x285]

It isnt possible to order cheese online?

Un-aged cheese cannot be shipped across state lines.

Well, there you go. Interesting.

I wish there was a goofy Taylor Swift GIF for that.


It's a little more complex than that, but general rule is if it is made from raw milk and not aged at least 60 days (I think, Google is failing me ATM) or pasteurized, the US doesn't allow it to cross state lines.
 
2014-03-11 10:19:08 PM  

Jim_Callahan: They're not even particularly complex or even solely locally-invented staples, Bolonga is the same processed light meat that every nation in every temperate-climate region of the world has come up with at one point or another (its only slightly more specific than "sausage") and pretty much everyone in the mediterranean band and western Europe has come up with Feta variants at one point or another.


3.bp.blogspot.com

Every spacefaring race has two things in common. First, they have a food identical to what humans call "Swedish meatballs."
 
2014-03-11 10:19:09 PM  
Suck it, Europe.

You guys had every opportunity to protect your regional names when these products were introduced.

/having said that, I have no objection to getting rid of Kraft Parmesean cheese, that stuff is awful
 
2014-03-11 10:20:08 PM  

Gunny Highway: doyner: Gunny Highway: Order it online.

[media2.giphy.com image 245x285]

It isnt possible to order cheese online?


Sure it is.  And I get the real stuff at places mentioned here already.  Sweet Jesus, people are touchy!  I'm talking about the Made-in-the-USA industrial garbage that gets labeled with the traditional names of REAL FOOD.

All I was saying is that the yellow cardboard shavings in the green can being called something else has no impact on my life.

No wonder the rest of the world thinks we're shallow narcissists.  People get their panties all in a wad if other countries seek to protect their economic interests the way we do.
 
2014-03-11 10:20:25 PM  
itcamefromschenectady: I don't know about where you live, but I've never had any trouble finding parmigiano reggiano in the US.

It's easy to find crumbled paraffin candles that smell like toenails in American supermarkets. Finding cheeses requires a trip to a speciality shop.

/urban living ftw
 
2014-03-11 10:20:47 PM  

aerojockey: Suck it, Europe.

You guys had every opportunity to protect your regional names when these products were introduced.

/having said that, I have no objection to getting rid of Kraft Parmesean cheese, that stuff is awful


You can take my Shaky Cheese when you pry it from my cold, dead hands.

/I would, however, support a name change to Shaky Cheese.
 
2014-03-11 10:20:59 PM  

Apatheist: brap: My Oscar has a first name, it's O-S-C-A-R!
My Oscar has a second name, it's M-A-Y-E-R!

*ring!*

Hello?

Yes, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, I will immediately cease and desist on the use of your trademarked name.

GOT DAMMIT!

My processed meat discs have a first name it's the artist formerly known as O-S-C-A-R

My processed meat discs have a second name it's.....that's it, I QUIT

Is this the pirate community's version of "thanks, Obama"? I mean, the way you injected the Academy in there, likely intending to refer to the MPAA (neither of which would be the one sending C&Ds), and conflated copyright law with trademark law a la Dumb Starbucks...it was rather amazing.

/ 9/10


hmmm..i thought what he said was actually humorous.

but are you saying the Academy does not hold copyright and trademark rights for the Oscars and the statue?  are you also saying the naming right is not a trademark?

i know you are very serious about this because you said conflate.
 
2014-03-11 10:21:15 PM  

JesusJuice: It's cute that Europe thinks they have any chance whatsoever of winning this argument. The moment this issue enters the popular consciousness, every US politician will be working against the EU on this to score cheap political points.

They don't have a snowballs chance in hell.


To be fair, this is really sort of a surrender to America in this negotiation in the long run, short of the entire US population revolting over this there's a very significant chance that our negotiators won't actually give a shiat.

What the exchange is here is cheap political points for the  European side (as mentioned in my previous post, "standing up to the US" is a really good way to get ahead in regional politics in Europe), but doesn't help in Europe in any way financially, whereas the concessions we're getting in exchange... well, we're the US, if our in-exchange demands aren't actual bottom-line/market dominance things I'll eat my farkin' hat.

So you  could look at it as essentially the Euro guys being really,  really cheap to bribe.  Sort of the equivalent of dumping money into re-election funds of people giving us a good (money-wise) deal on the trade agreement.

//Unless you  actually think that US products having to change their names slightly (into something Trademarkable, coincidentally) will actually cause anyone, even Europeans, to stop buying them.  Please tell me if you do think that, because I wouldn't mind laughing even harder.
 
2014-03-11 10:22:26 PM  

doyner: All I was saying is that the yellow cardboard shavings in the green can being called something else has no impact on my life.


You have yellow shavings where you are?
 
2014-03-11 10:22:54 PM  
Look - how about some symbol you can stamp on the product so the hipsters will know it's authentic-per-EU-rules, and the EU authorities can get their price premium? Like on kosher foods, there's a little K. What sort of symbol could mark a food product as authentic-per-EU-rules? Nothing that will suggest the American product is inferior or inauthentic, just something that says the product is approved by EU trade authorities.
 
pla
2014-03-11 10:23:12 PM  
dprathbun : I'm all for it.  Stop calling stuff something that it's not just because it sounds good.

Why?  If someone else can make the sole claim-to-fame of your hometown (pathetic much?), be that Cheddar or Scotch or Mobile homes, better and cheaper than you can - Fark you and your horse.

Feta doesn't become non-Feta just because a factory in Idaho made it, no matter what your local Don* has too blather about it.

*/ Oh, and "Mafia" doesn't become "Sicilian-style organized crime" just because the Russians do it better, so suck it, wannabe dirt-farmers!
 
2014-03-11 10:23:15 PM  

Gunny Highway: doyner: All I was saying is that the yellow cardboard shavings in the green can being called something else has no impact on my life.

You have yellow shavings where you are?


Yes.  It's called "Kraft Parmesan Cheese."
 
2014-03-11 10:24:17 PM  

doyner: Gunny Highway: doyner: All I was saying is that the yellow cardboard shavings in the green can being called something else has no impact on my life.

You have yellow shavings where you are?

Yes.  It's called "Kraft Parmesan Cheese."


We call that white shavings up here.
 
2014-03-11 10:24:47 PM  

Gunny Highway: doyner: Gunny Highway: doyner: All I was saying is that the yellow cardboard shavings in the green can being called something else has no impact on my life.

You have yellow shavings where you are?

Yes.  It's called "Kraft Parmesan Cheese."

We call that white shavings up here.


Apparently they're fresher up there.
 
2014-03-11 10:25:07 PM  

JungleBoogie: Look - how about some symbol you can stamp on the product so the hipsters will know it's authentic-per-EU-rules, and the EU authorities can get their price premium? Like on kosher foods, there's a little K. What sort of symbol could mark a food product as authentic-per-EU-rules? Nothing that will suggest the American product is inferior or inauthentic, just something that says the product is approved by EU trade authorities.


Wasn't there a section in the Bible on this?
 
2014-03-11 10:25:16 PM  

doyner: Gunny Highway: doyner: Gunny Highway: Order it online.

[media2.giphy.com image 245x285]

It isnt possible to order cheese online?

Sure it is.  And I get the real stuff at places mentioned here already.  Sweet Jesus, people are touchy!  I'm talking about the Made-in-the-USA industrial garbage that gets labeled with the traditional names of REAL FOOD.

All I was saying is that the yellow cardboard shavings in the green can being called something else has no impact on my life.

No wonder the rest of the world thinks we're shallow narcissists.  People get their panties all in a wad if other countries seek to protect their economic interests the way we do.


And to be completely honest, I'm kinda fine with calling that stuff something other than Parmesan.

How about we compromise, and the stuff from Italy is called Parmigiano Reggiano with the protected logo, and the other hard cheese stuff like it is called Parmesan and is minus the logo, and Kraft can call the stuff they sell processed Italian style cheese dust
 
2014-03-11 10:26:25 PM  

Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.

Parmesan is not some specialty food, it's a core condiment/component of the most popular "ethnic" food in the US.

Why is ethnic in quotes?

B/c Italian food, especially the kinds we usually eat here, are more American than Italian. Most of it was invented in New York.

By Italian immigrants?  Based on recipes they brought over from Italy?  Or am I over simplifying?


I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.
 
2014-03-11 10:27:32 PM  
 
2014-03-11 10:28:00 PM  

Xetal: I'm okay with that... as long as Europe stops trying to copy American inventions and only buys them from America.  Inventions such as:

Airbags, Airplanes, pacemakers, electronic calculators, computers, telephones (and all future deviations thereof), digital cameras, gamma cameras, glucose meters, hard discs, GPUs, the Internet, the laser, MRI, the polio vaccine, PET scanning, the refrigerator, the solar cell (looking at YOU, Germany), the transistor, and video games.

Or maybe you should be trying harder to avoid a catastrophic economic collapse of the Euro instead of crying about cheese.


The Euro is doing fine right now and I think if you look into it you'll discover the American patents are being honoured.
 
2014-03-11 10:28:13 PM  

meat0918: How about we compromise, and the stuff from Italy is called Parmigiano Reggiano with the protected logo, and the other hard cheese stuff like it is called Parmesan and is minus the logo, and Kraft can call the stuff they sell processed Italian style cheese dust


It's probably mostly cellulose anyway...
 
2014-03-11 10:28:31 PM  

capt.hollister: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.

Parmesan is not some specialty food, it's a core condiment/component of the most popular "ethnic" food in the US.

Why is ethnic in quotes?

B/c Italian food, especially the kinds we usually eat here, are more American than Italian. Most of it was invented in New York.

By Italian immigrants?  Based on recipes they brought over from Italy?  Or am I over simplifying?

I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.


Right. It's Italian American food, and has been adapted by the culture to fit local tastes.
 
2014-03-11 10:29:04 PM  

capt.hollister: I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.


Not only have we been desensitized by American products, but we've become accustomed to American ingredients.  Even if it is a first generation Italian cooking an authentic recipe, chances are it isn't going to be the same when done using the vast majority of produce here.
 
2014-03-11 10:29:41 PM  

capt.hollister:So, it is your belief that the US is feeding the EU ?

All of it?  No.

Significant parts of it?  Yes.  Pretty much all of the ex-soviet parts of the union are still running significant agricultural deficits currently being filled mostly by the US.  Primarily grains, for obvious reasons.

It's one of the primary reasons... no, it's  the reason the US is still a superpower in world politics even two decades after the cold war ended.  Sure, we've got the military thing, but no one would put up with our military shiat (and we do require a lot of leeway/tolerance to pull most of it) were we not feeding a huge chunk of the globe.

yukichigai: Every spacefaring race has two things in common. First, they have a food identical to what humans call "Swedish meatballs."


Well, in this case the varieties themselves are literally identical, both in historical terms of parallel styles and in modern terms of being literally the same product.

If you want to take a step back up the ladder and look at broader categories, though, there are some functional foods that basically everyone has in common.  The most entertaining one being the cold-meat sandwich/wrap, which I think almost literally everybody's come up with in one way or another.  Probably just 'cause it's so useful.
 
2014-03-11 10:30:05 PM  
Fine. We'll just name these things what they'd be called if the United States didn't exist. Say, what did Hitler call these things? Because that's what they'd be called! You get what I'm saying?
 
2014-03-11 10:32:10 PM  

capt.hollister: I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't. Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.


I know there is a difference (I have been there and have a tomato allergy.  Wasnt as hard as I thought it was going to be), I was was just wondering why he put quotes around the word ethnic.  The food came out of ethnic Italian neighborhoods.  Just thought it was interesting that it lost its "ethnic" label.  Not questioning the authenticity of Tony's mama's gabagool,
 
2014-03-11 10:32:28 PM  

finnished: meat0918: How about we compromise, and the stuff from Italy is called Parmigiano Reggiano with the protected logo, and the other hard cheese stuff like it is called Parmesan and is minus the logo, and Kraft can call the stuff they sell processed Italian style cheese dust

It's probably mostly cellulose anyway...


I'm still not sure how this

www.garycameron.org

Is 100% Parmesan.

//At least it is mostly Parmesan cheese
 
2014-03-11 10:32:35 PM  
Look, I'm all for enforcing accurate labeling on foods.  But, if anybody in the EU has deluded himself or herself into believing that consumers are confused about what they're getting, and that this is somehow costing "authentic" food producers money, that poor deluded person is going to have a bad time.

I'm not exactly a foodie, but here's the deal.  The difference between decent imitation Parmesan cheese produced in the USA and decent authentic Parmesan is well within the realm of variation of flavor, color and texture that one would attribute to different cheese makers, different farms, different animals, etc.  In other words, it's practically non-existent.  The same goes for practically every other regional cheese and food product that comes to mind, and that I've had an opportunity to sample.  But there's one big difference, at least in the USA, the locally produced food items tend to be noticeably cheaper and quite frankly, often times better, all things considered.

So feel free to make a fuss and be pedantic about what we call it.  However, I'm really only going to point in laugh when your dreams of a financial windfall after those poor confused consumers switch all their purchases over to your product fails to materialize.  And, when you start getting cranky that you can't suddenly start padding your bed mattress in Euros, please know that your misguided and childish elitist insults of our clearly superior products is going to make my selection of wonderful domestic cheeses taste just that much better.
 
JVD
2014-03-11 10:33:19 PM  
I offer a hearty GFY to the EU.
 
pla
2014-03-11 10:33:47 PM  
Jim_Callahan : So you could look at it as essentially the Euro guys being really, really cheap to bribe.

Can I subscribe to your newsletter?   Seriously?  You've convinced me of the error of my ways.  Yes, of course you can have exclusive rights to the words scrotum cheese, if only you agree to run only Microsoft or Apple software at your company.

Pass me that sparkling wine and aged Italian-style cheese... And my dividend check!
 
2014-03-11 10:34:07 PM  

doyner: capt.hollister: I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.

Not only have we been desensitized by American products, but we've become accustomed to American ingredients.  Even if it is a first generation Italian cooking an authentic recipe, chances are it isn't going to be the same when done using the vast majority of produce here.


I dunno why, but you're really grating me the wrong way here.
 
2014-03-11 10:34:52 PM  
What about French fries, Irish stew, and Pizza is definetly an issue
 
2014-03-11 10:35:39 PM  

MrHappyRotter: Look, I'm all for enforcing accurate labeling on foods.  But, if anybody in the EU has deluded himself or herself into believing that consumers are confused about what they're getting, and that this is somehow costing "authentic" food producers money, that poor deluded person is going to have a bad time.

I'm not exactly a foodie, but here's the deal.  The difference between decent imitation Parmesan cheese produced in the USA and decent authentic Parmesan is well within the realm of variation of flavor, color and texture that one would attribute to different cheese makers, different farms, different animals, etc.  In other words, it's practically non-existent.  The same goes for practically every other regional cheese and food product that comes to mind, and that I've had an opportunity to sample.  But there's one big difference, at least in the USA, the locally produced food items tend to be noticeably cheaper and quite frankly, often times better, all things considered.

So feel free to make a fuss and be pedantic about what we call it.  However, I'm really only going to point in laugh when your dreams of a financial windfall after those poor confused consumers switch all their purchases over to your product fails to materialize.  And, when you start getting cranky that you can't suddenly start padding your bed mattress in Euros, please know that your misguided and childish elitist insults of our clearly superior products is going to make my selection of wonderful domestic cheeses taste just that much better.


LOL!
 
2014-03-11 10:35:51 PM  

doyner: itcamefromschenectady: I don't know about where you live, but I've never had any trouble finding parmigiano reggiano in the US.

If it's real parmigiano reggiano, the rule wouldn't apply.


I'm saying that parmigiano reggiano is already restricted to genuine Italian product as far as I can tell, so I don't see why "parmesan" has to be. There is a huge difference between the two but I'm already used to "parmesan" being plastic cheese and I don't see what problem it solves if we regulate it. What do we call it then, "parmesan-style"?

I'm not against some names being regulated, but I'm not convinced that we need to restrict all the ones the EU wants to.
 
2014-03-11 10:36:51 PM  
And if we don't comply? Lots of sternly worded letters?
 
2014-03-11 10:36:57 PM  

meat0918: doyner: capt.hollister: I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.

Not only have we been desensitized by American products, but we've become accustomed to American ingredients.  Even if it is a first generation Italian cooking an authentic recipe, chances are it isn't going to be the same when done using the vast majority of produce here.

I dunno why, but you're really grating me the wrong way here.


Probably because people have been making me out to be some kine of muenster here.
 
2014-03-11 10:37:23 PM  

BluVeinThrobber: What about French fries, Irish stew, and Pizza is definetly an issue


Those are recipes, not ingredients.
 
2014-03-11 10:39:10 PM  

BKITU: [static.tvgcdn.net image 300x206]

"I had to legally change my name to Ray Hard Salty Sheep Cheese."


Applause
 
2014-03-11 10:39:18 PM  

doyner: meat0918: doyner: capt.hollister: I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.

Not only have we been desensitized by American products, but we've become accustomed to American ingredients.  Even if it is a first generation Italian cooking an authentic recipe, chances are it isn't going to be the same when done using the vast majority of produce here.

I dunno why, but you're really grating me the wrong way here.

Probably because people have been making me out to be some kine of muenster here.


okay those last two exchanges were pretty funny!

/making me peckish and esurient
 
2014-03-11 10:39:47 PM  

Jim_Callahan: To be fair, this is really sort of a surrender to America in this negotiation in the long run, short of the entire US population revolting over this there's a very significant chance that our negotiators won't actually give a shiat.


You did notice that TFA was about 55 Senators getting pissed off about this? You know, the body made up of 100 people that will need 67 of them to agree in order to approve this deal?

When 55 Senators tell the negotiators "don't even farking think it", the negotiators will actually give a shiat.
 
2014-03-11 10:39:47 PM  

finnished: Chill out. We already have a set of rules in the US defining what a product must be like to be sold under the name. It's called Standards of Identity for food. It already defines what qualities the product must have, like for example ice cream, mayo etc. etc. The production location could be just another quality.


So that's why a mixture of candle wax and melted brown crayon is called "chocolate" in the USA?
 
2014-03-11 10:40:25 PM  

doyner: meat0918: doyner: capt.hollister: I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.

Not only have we been desensitized by American products, but we've become accustomed to American ingredients.  Even if it is a first generation Italian cooking an authentic recipe, chances are it isn't going to be the same when done using the vast majority of produce here.

I dunno why, but you're really grating me the wrong way here.

Probably because people have been making me out to be some kine of muenster here.


That's the whey things are around here.
 
2014-03-11 10:41:05 PM  

MrHappyRotter: Look, I'm all for enforcing accurate labeling on foods.  But, if anybody in the EU has deluded himself or herself into believing that consumers are confused about what they're getting, and that this is somehow costing "authentic" food producers money, that poor deluded person is going to have a bad time.

I'm not exactly a foodie, but here's the deal.  The difference between decent imitation Parmesan cheese produced in the USA and decent authentic Parmesan is well within the realm of variation of flavor, color and texture that one would attribute to different cheese makers, different farms, different animals, etc.  In other words, it's practically non-existent.  The same goes for practically every other regional cheese and food product that comes to mind, and that I've had an opportunity to sample.  But there's one big difference, at least in the USA, the locally produced food items tend to be noticeably cheaper and quite frankly, often times better, all things considered.

So feel free to make a fuss and be pedantic about what we call it.  However, I'm really only going to point in laugh when your dreams of a financial windfall after those poor confused consumers switch all their purchases over to your product fails to materialize.  And, when you start getting cranky that you can't suddenly start padding your bed mattress in Euros, please know that your misguided and childish elitist insults of our clearly superior products is going to make my selection of wonderful domestic cheeses taste just that much better.


You left out consistencey
 
2014-03-11 10:42:01 PM  

meat0918: doyner: meat0918: doyner: capt.hollister: I can assure you that what you think of as "Italian" food isn't.  Not even what you order in an expensive New York restaurant. Not even what you eat at your friend Tony's house prepared by his mom who is a third generation descendant of immigrants.

Not only have we been desensitized by American products, but we've become accustomed to American ingredients.  Even if it is a first generation Italian cooking an authentic recipe, chances are it isn't going to be the same when done using the vast majority of produce here.

I dunno why, but you're really grating me the wrong way here.

Probably because people have been making me out to be some kine of muenster here.

That's the whey things are around here.


This is getting mold.
 
2014-03-11 10:42:13 PM  

Jim_Callahan:  ....Bolonga is the same processed light meat that every nation in every temperate-climate region of the world has come up with at one point or another...


No. Not even close. For starters, the only Bologna in Italy is a city. "Bologna" sausage is a North American sausage somewhat  derived from mortadella which is itself a sausage originally invented in the city of Bologna, but the two final products are very different indeed. Do yourself a favour, try some very thinly sliced San Daniele mortadella. You will thank me and you might even change opinions as to the commonality of all processed light meat sausages.
 
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