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(PennLive)   Like things like parmesan cheese, feta cheese, or even bologna? Those products might lose their names in the United States   (pennlive.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, U.S., Greek, greek yogurt, Parma, feta cheese, American Brands, Black Forest, parmesan  
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2014-03-11 09:55:06 PM  
This is easily doable:

Parmesan shall now be Parmejan.

Feta shall now be Fetuh.

Bologna shall now be Baloney.

'Cuz 'Murica, that's why.
 
2014-03-11 09:55:10 PM  

kayanlau: Easy - just append "Imitation" before every North America product name that the EU is complaining about.


That is what I was thinking. Kraft Parmesan is processed cheese stored in a plastic tube on a shelf, I think "imitation" is pretty much understood already.
 
2014-03-11 09:55:29 PM  

yukichigai: In the US I doubt anyone thinks Parmesan comes from anywhere but the US.


I bet people would say, "uhhh, it is Italian, right? Is this a trick question?"
 
2014-03-11 09:56:19 PM  

Trocadero: The feta one is especially stupid, b/c there's no one place in Greece where it's made, and it's not named for said place, unlike bourbon, tequila, or steam beer.


Bourbon can be made anywhere in the US.
 
2014-03-11 09:56:25 PM  

ClavellBCMI: Enforce your laws all you want in the EU, just don't export them here (and we will keep our laws over here... hopefully).


Sorry, we have free trade agreements.  They even supersede any US law that could be passed.  Thanks, globalization!
 
2014-03-11 09:57:49 PM  

whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.


Parmesan is not some specialty food, it's a core condiment/component of the most popular "ethnic" food in the US.
 
2014-03-11 09:58:25 PM  

doyner: If we had parmesan mozzarella or feta in this country, sure, that'd be annoying.  Seeing as we have only colored and flavored plastic in our supermarkets, I see no reason for outrage.


Bullcrap. We have feta, parmesan and mozzarella in this country. Not everything sold as them qualifies, but there's plenty up to European standards. If Bulgarians can make feta and flood the market or the French can make parmesan and sell them as such - and they do - there's no reason good reason for Americans not to use the names.
 
2014-03-11 09:58:50 PM  

Yellow Beard: any country whose arse we didn't save in ww2 can feel free to have an issue. all others should pay the bill for our saving their arses and then we can talk


The French don't get any credit for helping us out during the Revolution?
 
2014-03-11 09:59:12 PM  
USA does not import IP restrictions, it exports them.  Don't like it? Don't sign those trade agreements.

/Not from the USA
//Wish more countries would tell the USA to fark off when it comes to their own IP bullcrap
 
2014-03-11 09:59:55 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4_G7HHJ0GE

He would like a word with you on this.
 
2014-03-11 10:00:07 PM  

Trocadero: whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.

Parmesan is not some specialty food, it's a core condiment/component of the most popular "ethnic" food in the US.


Why is ethnic in quotes?
 
2014-03-11 10:00:18 PM  
WHAT ABOUT TEXAS TOAST?

/we just call it toast
 
2014-03-11 10:00:34 PM  

Apatheist: Is this the pirate community's version of "thanks, Obama"? I mean, the way you injected the Academy in there, likely intending to refer to the MPAA (neither of which would be the one sending C&Ds), and conflated copyright law with trademark law a la Dumb Starbucks...it was rather amazing.

/ 9/10


I can't feel my face, everything oozes, I can hear what my dog is thinking,...and you expect me to be a copyright lawyer?

It was an Oscar thing BTW, I reread it, snapped, and went back to bongo practice.
 
2014-03-11 10:00:45 PM  

cptjeff: Yellow Beard: any country whose arse we didn't save in ww2 can feel free to have an issue. all others should pay the bill for our saving their arses and then we can talk

Maybe the US Trade Rep should bring a bill for WWII and the Marshall plan to the next negotiation. And the Berlin Airlift, 'cuz why not?


why not indeed. we spent a fortune saving a whole lot of people and they have never kicked a dime back to us. I'd rather they just said thank you and went on their way. otherwise, perhaps we can ban the importation of every single product they are having an issue with and see if they still have a problem with naming rights.
 
2014-03-11 10:01:44 PM  

fusillade762: Yellow Beard: any country whose arse we didn't save in ww2 can feel free to have an issue. all others should pay the bill for our saving their arses and then we can talk

The French don't get any credit for helping us out during the Revolution?


smelly surrender monkeys never get credit...lol
 
2014-03-11 10:01:53 PM  

TV's Vinnie: OgreMagi: cptjeff: The EU can fark off.

The EU will ban American products in the same category if we don't go along.  For example, if California sparkling wines were labeled "Champagne" or simply said "champagne method", ALL American wines would be banned in the entire EU.

Since when does the EU buy American Cheese or wines? Before he got croaked, Steve Irwin used to campaign & lobby Australian authorities to ban American cheeses from it's shores.


Some US wines are really popular, I can't think of any wine shop or supermarket that doesn't stock New World wines but you couldn't give away the cheese.

I think it's fair to label clearly. If I'm buying Parmesan I want Parmesan, not something that's almost-but-not-quite Parmesan and I want that clear on the label. Same with any other product that is tied to a location. Roquefort tastes like it does because of the exact conditions of the caves it's aged in, that can't be duplicated elsewhere so anything else isn't Roquefort.

/got a big chunk of Gruyère in the fridge that will become best friends with some onion soup tomorrow and it's room mate, some Lanark Blue, is going into lanark blue, celeriac and walnut soda bread.
 
2014-03-11 10:02:12 PM  
How about no?

Does no work for you?
 
2014-03-11 10:02:21 PM  

fusillade762: Yellow Beard: any country whose arse we didn't save in ww2 can feel free to have an issue. all others should pay the bill for our saving their arses and then we can talk

The French don't get any credit for helping us out during the Revolution?


Okay, okay, okay.  We're even-steven with the French, so if they want to be jerks about food names, they can.  Everyone else though...
 
2014-03-11 10:02:47 PM  

Gunny Highway: Trocadero: whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.

Parmesan is not some specialty food, it's a core condiment/component of the most popular "ethnic" food in the US.

Why is ethnic in quotes?


B/c Italian food, especially the kinds we usually eat here, are more American than Italian. Most of it was invented in New York.
 
2014-03-11 10:02:52 PM  
mlkshk.com

Too many culturally deficient products out there that are destroying the reputation and value of the real deal.
 
2014-03-11 10:03:44 PM  

OgreMagi: TV's Vinnie: OgreMagi: cptjeff: The EU can fark off.

The EU will ban American products in the same category if we don't go along.  For example, if California sparkling wines were labeled "Champagne" or simply said "champagne method", ALL American wines would be banned in the entire EU.

Since when does the EU buy American Cheese or wines? Before he got croaked, Steve Irwin used to campaign & lobby Australian authorities to ban American cheeses from it's shores.

I don't know about our cheese, but California wine is quite popular in Europe.


Which may explain the REAL reason why the EU wineries are whining: to thwart the competition.
 
2014-03-11 10:04:11 PM  

Gunny Highway: yukichigai: In the US I doubt anyone thinks Parmesan comes from anywhere but the US.

I bet people would say, "uhhh, it is Italian, right? Is this a trick question?"


In the context that they hope its made by real Italians maybe.  Far too many states, California and Wisconsin being chiefest among them, have made their reputation on producing a large and varying array of cheeses.  The first thought most people will have is one of those, unless you ask specifically about a cheese purchased at a specialty store that charges a huge markup.
 
2014-03-11 10:05:17 PM  

Trocadero: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.

Parmesan is not some specialty food, it's a core condiment/component of the most popular "ethnic" food in the US.

Why is ethnic in quotes?

B/c Italian food, especially the kinds we usually eat here, are more American than Italian. Most of it was invented in New York.


By Italian immigrants?  Based on recipes they brought over from Italy?  Or am I over simplifying?
 
2014-03-11 10:06:14 PM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: In Quebec, the provincial government only wants French used in public, I heard on the radio that Italian restaurants in Montreal are being fined because they keep using the word "pasta" in their menus. Wait till they try this crap on the native tribes up north. Someone will get an arrow to the head.


This is what people end up believing when they only hear part of the story.
 
2014-03-11 10:06:32 PM  

OgreMagi: cptjeff: The EU can fark off.

The EU will ban American products in the same category if we don't go along.  For example, if California sparkling wines were labeled "Champagne" or simply said "champagne method", ALL American wines would be banned in the entire EU.


The EU would lose that trade war - badly.

Place names are cute, but a product is defined by its method and/or composition, not the first place it was made.
 
2014-03-11 10:06:52 PM  

itcamefromschenectady: I don't know about where you live, but I've never had any trouble finding parmigiano reggiano in the US.


If it's real parmigiano reggiano, the rule wouldn't apply.

Gunny Highway: A self-hating American comment in a cheese thread.

Amazing.


Oh, FFS...  Self-hating American?  More like an American who can't stand the crap our industrial food supply calls cheese.

brap: I know typing that made you feel  like some wildly well-traveled sophisticate but mozzarella doesn't travel well and thankfully, there are enough old Italians in Brooklyn that I can run out and get it the day it was made.  Of course then they break my legs for not being able to pay the principle or interest on my three-year fronted mozzarella binge but that's another story for another time.


If you're outside a major metropolitan area, fahgeddabout it.
 
2014-03-11 10:07:05 PM  

yukichigai: Gunny Highway: yukichigai: In the US I doubt anyone thinks Parmesan comes from anywhere but the US.

I bet people would say, "uhhh, it is Italian, right? Is this a trick question?"

In the context that they hope its made by real Italians maybe.  Far too many states, California and Wisconsin being chiefest among them, have made their reputation on producing a large and varying array of cheeses.  The first thought most people will have is one of those, unless you ask specifically about a cheese purchased at a specialty store that charges a huge markup.


I guess so.  I dont even really understand what you are going on about so I am just going to agree.
 
2014-03-11 10:07:47 PM  

yukichigai: Far too many states, California and Wisconsin being chiefest among them, have made their reputation on producing a large and varying array of cheeses. The first thought most people will have is one of those, unless you ask specifically about a cheese purchased at a specialty store that charges a huge markup.


If you're looking for real Parmesan you'll know to look for Parmigiano Regiano. If it comes in a little green shaker with a red label on it, you'll probably realize it's not Italian.
 
2014-03-11 10:08:00 PM  

Gunny Highway: Trocadero: Gunny Highway: Trocadero: whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.

Parmesan is not some specialty food, it's a core condiment/component of the most popular "ethnic" food in the US.

Why is ethnic in quotes?

B/c Italian food, especially the kinds we usually eat here, are more American than Italian. Most of it was invented in New York.

By Italian immigrants?  Based on recipes they brought over from Italy?  Or am I over simplifying?


you are way oversimplifying. Having been to Italy several times, I can tell you the food there bears only a passing resembalance to here
 
2014-03-11 10:08:09 PM  

vpb: It would be a good thing if they actually had to taste something like what they are called, but the whole business about having to make it in a certain place seems unreasonable.



We want China to quit counterfeiting our intellectual property, Europe's pretty much just asking for the same thing.

We already do it with wine. Things like cheese, (especially cheese, that's a big deal over there), work the same way over there. The region it's made in, where the majority of them derive their names, plays a large part in the final product.
 
2014-03-11 10:08:41 PM  
www.droidforums.net
 
2014-03-11 10:09:16 PM  

TheDeathMerchant: vpb: It would be a good thing if they actually had to taste something like what they are called, but the whole business about having to make it in a certain place seems unreasonable.


We want China to quit counterfeiting our intellectual property, Europe's pretty much just asking for the same thing.

We already do it with wine. Things like cheese, (especially cheese, that's a big deal over there), work the same way over there. The region it's made in, where the majority of them derive their names, plays a large part in the final product.


Which intellectual property are we taking, pray tell?
 
2014-03-11 10:09:34 PM  
Why not just put this on it if it is "real"

www.hellenicbrands.gr
 
2014-03-11 10:09:51 PM  

Suckmaster Burstingfoam: Btw I'm disappointed that there's as of yet been no "The British Sausage" references in this thread.


www.yes-minister.com

Apparently it's got to be called the "Emulsified High-Fat Offal Tube."
 
2014-03-11 10:10:08 PM  
I sure as fark hope the government at least demands something major in return if they agree to this.
 
2014-03-11 10:10:09 PM  
Well, then, they have to stop ordering cheeseburgers from McDonald's with American Cheese on them. That'll teach them!
 
2014-03-11 10:10:39 PM  

doyner: If you're outside a major metropolitan area, fahgeddabout it.


doyner: itcamefromschenectady: I don't know about where you live, but I've never had any trouble finding parmigiano reggiano in the US.

If it's real parmigiano reggiano, the rule wouldn't apply.

Gunny Highway: A self-hating American comment in a cheese thread.

Amazing.

Oh, FFS...  Self-hating American?  More like an American who can't stand the crap our industrial food supply calls cheese.

brap: I know typing that made you feel  like some wildly well-traveled sophisticate but mozzarella doesn't travel well and thankfully, there are enough old Italians in Brooklyn that I can run out and get it the day it was made.  Of course then they break my legs for not being able to pay the principle or interest on my three-year fronted mozzarella binge but that's another story for another time.

If you're outside a major metropolitan area, fahgeddabout it.


Order it online.
 
2014-03-11 10:10:43 PM  
My wife and I were traveling on the high speed train from Rome to Venice and sat across from two Italians who worked for the ministry that classified and enforced this type of labeling in Italy and the EU.

They were fascinated and disturbed by Olive Garden.
 
2014-03-11 10:10:49 PM  
It's cute that Europe thinks they have any chance whatsoever of winning this argument. The moment this issue enters the popular consciousness, every US politician will be working against the EU on this to score cheap political points.

They don't have a snowballs chance in hell.
 
2014-03-11 10:11:12 PM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: In Quebec, the provincial government only wants French used in public, I heard on the radio that Italian restaurants in Montreal are being fined because they keep using the word "pasta" in their menus. Wait till they try this crap on the native tribes up north. Someone will get an arrow to the head.


Wrong meme.
 
2014-03-11 10:11:23 PM  

Gunny Highway: yukichigai: Gunny Highway: yukichigai: In the US I doubt anyone thinks Parmesan comes from anywhere but the US.

I bet people would say, "uhhh, it is Italian, right? Is this a trick question?"

In the context that they hope its made by real Italians maybe.  Far too many states, California and Wisconsin being chiefest among them, have made their reputation on producing a large and varying array of cheeses.  The first thought most people will have is one of those, unless you ask specifically about a cheese purchased at a specialty store that charges a huge markup.

I guess so.  I dont even really understand what you are going on about so I am just going to agree.


I'm saying if you find someone coming out of a US grocery store with some Parmesan cheese and ask them where it was made, 9 times out of 10 they are going to answer with something that counts as "in the US".  Almost nobody stateside thinks the Parmesan cheese available here is made in Parma, Italy.

Look, the EU can have their specific definitions for all kinds of words, like "fanny".  That doesn't mean we have to use those definitions, nor should we.
 
pla
2014-03-11 10:12:12 PM  
Dear cheese-eating surrender-monkeys...

We don't care.  You can force us (or rather, we don't care enough about your BS regional protectionism to fight over it) to label it "Bankrupt-island-nation style sheep's-milk cheese", but we will still call it "Feta".

So take your "Cheddar" and "Feta" and "Champagne", and go fark yourselves soundly to sleep, because we'll still call them what you don't want us to label them, 'kay?

/Enjoying a nice slice of Generic Northern European Style Cheese with holes in it as I write this.  Suck it, Switzerland!  You still won't get any more money from me... Happy?
 
gja
2014-03-11 10:13:03 PM  
Screw them. So very hard and with a hitching post.
Don't want to have trade relations all of a sudden?

wellbye.jpg
 
2014-03-11 10:13:13 PM  
I'm okay with that... as long as Europe stops trying to copy American inventions and only buys them from America.  Inventions such as:

Airbags, Airplanes, pacemakers, electronic calculators, computers, telephones (and all future deviations thereof), digital cameras, gamma cameras, glucose meters, hard discs, GPUs, the Internet, the laser, MRI, the polio vaccine, PET scanning, the refrigerator, the solar cell (looking at YOU, Germany), the transistor, and video games.

Or maybe you should be trying harder to avoid a catastrophic economic collapse of the Euro instead of crying about cheese.
 
2014-03-11 10:13:13 PM  

Gunny Highway: Order it online.


media2.giphy.com
 
2014-03-11 10:13:34 PM  
No no. Everyone's looking at this all wrong. This means we get to rename all this stuff after American places and American heros! It's a clean slate! To start, let's rename bologna "Fillioni" after famed Castle actor Nathan Fillion.
 
2014-03-11 10:13:45 PM  

whatshisname: Jim_Callahan: where staples are concerned the US is feeding like 80% of the world

I doubt that, but these aren't staples anyway. They're distinctive specialty foods known for their region of origin.


They're  cheese and processed meat.  The only food more common and basic than that is bread.

They're not even particularly complex or even solely locally-invented staples, Bolonga is the same processed light meat that every nation in every temperate-climate region of the world has come up with at one point or another (its only slightly more specific than "sausage") and pretty much everyone in the mediterranean band and western Europe has come up with Feta variants at one point or another.

The relevant point here, though, is that the varieties are the same product, and area of origin doesn't actually change anything about the foods in question, so trying to restrict words used to refer to the type of food for over five centuries is just arbitrarily being a dick.  But the fact that they're staples is why the US will win the argument if we really want to... their entire strategy right now is kind of to hope we don't care and will just shrug and roll with it like we did for Scotch, at which point the petty morons responsible will try to leverage it as "standing up to the US" for future elections.

// I know this because, again, Scotch.  Not even a particularly scotland-unique blend, but they raised a fuss over it, we were basically like "... a'ight, whatevs, man, fine by us" and then a couple petty asshats that had held the negotiation hostage for no damned reason whatsoever turned "standing up to the US" into a political career.
 
2014-03-11 10:13:56 PM  
No problem, EU.  "Trash Wop Meat," "Surrender Cheese" and "Balkanesque Yeast Infections" it is.
 
2014-03-11 10:13:57 PM  
Fried Bologna, Feta and Parmesan shall now be called an EU Ghetto Steak Sandwich!
 
2014-03-11 10:14:17 PM  

doyner: Gunny Highway: Order it online.

[media2.giphy.com image 245x285]


It isnt possible to order cheese online?
 
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