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(JSOnline)   Just in from the Office of the Painfully Obvious: "Wisconsin study says untreated drinking water has more risk of illness"   (jsonline.com) divider line 52
    More: Obvious, Wisconsin, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, drinking water, Wisconsin study, illness, University of California at Davis, American Journal of Public Health, Environmental Health Perspectives  
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907 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Mar 2014 at 4:31 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-03-11 04:33:59 PM  
ayay.co.uk
 
2014-03-11 04:34:05 PM  
But at least it isnt fluridated. Mandrake you can start by making me a drink of grain alcohol and rain water.
 
2014-03-11 04:36:44 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-03-11 04:36:50 PM  
Ric Romero apparently on sick leave from drinking said water.
 
2014-03-11 04:38:06 PM  
Treating municipal water is not required in Wisconsin. The Legislature in 2011 rejected a proposal to require treatment. Democrats have introduced a bill in the current session that would require communities to provide disinfection. However, the measure has little likelihood of passage in the Republican-controlled Assembly and Senate.
 
2014-03-11 04:38:44 PM  
This is why I dump bleach in all of my drinking water. Clean as a whistle.
 
2014-03-11 04:38:53 PM  
Great, now big govt is gonna step in where they don't belong with regulations to ensure all those tasty chemicals are removed from our drinking water.
 
2014-03-11 04:39:13 PM  
Unfortunately, the response to this will be "We need to buy more bottled water" instead of "We need to improve the water system we already pay for".
 
2014-03-11 04:39:19 PM  

lockers: [img.fark.net image 850x595]


That's from the Onion, right? Please tell me that was drawn as lampshading satire.
 
2014-03-11 04:39:48 PM  
But the study didn't answer the important question of 'is water wet?'
 
2014-03-11 04:41:47 PM  

hardinparamedic: lockers: [img.fark.net image 850x595]

That's from the Onion, right? Please tell me that was drawn as lampshading satire.


Yeah, that's the onion.
 
2014-03-11 04:43:23 PM  

hardinparamedic: lockers: [img.fark.net image 850x595]

That's from the Onion, right? Please tell me that was drawn as lampshading satire.


It's the onion.
 
2014-03-11 04:44:18 PM  

lockers: hardinparamedic: lockers: [img.fark.net image 850x595]

That's from the Onion, right? Please tell me that was drawn as lampshading satire.

Yeah, that's the onion.


Private_Citizen: hardinparamedic: lockers: [img.fark.net image 850x595]

That's from the Onion, right? Please tell me that was drawn as lampshading satire.

It's the onion.


Phew. My faith in humanity remains somewhat above zero, then.
 
2014-03-11 04:53:37 PM  

Shadi: Treating municipal water is not required in Wisconsin. The Legislature in 2011 rejected a proposal to require treatment. Democrats have introduced a bill in the current session that would require communities to provide disinfection. However, the measure has little likelihood of passage in the Republican-controlled Assembly and Senate.



You know what's on the Republican-controlled Wisconsin State Senate's agenda for today?

1. Cutting back on early voting, doing away with it altogether on weekends, and
2. Lengthening the time period in which it's legal for lobbyists to make campaign contributions in an election year.
 
2014-03-11 04:55:09 PM  
In Wisconsin, they call making beer with the untreated water "kräusening."
 
2014-03-11 05:07:19 PM  
Yes but there's much less risk of government mind control serum.
 
2014-03-11 05:13:45 PM  
I'll take dysentery over a crystallized pineal gland!
 
2014-03-11 05:15:37 PM  
Living in Wisconsin, that is why we drink beer and not water.  It is much safer.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-03-11 05:17:32 PM  
Fun fact: "The largest waterborne disease outbreak in United States history occurred in 1993 in Milwaukee, WI when over 400,000 people became ill with diarrhea when the parasite Cryptosporidium was found in the city's drinking water supply." (CDC)

Funner fact: Milwaukee had a water treatment system, but the filters were offline for maintenance during a period of heavy rain.
 
2014-03-11 05:24:08 PM  
Says you.
nighthawknews.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-03-11 05:29:57 PM  
www.lakesuperiorstreams.org
 
2014-03-11 05:38:20 PM  
This is unacceptable. Why are we letting our drinking water become ill?

qorkfiend: Unfortunately, the response to this will be "We need to buy more bottled water" instead of "We need to improve the water system we already pay for".


Where is this sudden Fark fad coming from? You guys finally getting tired of blaming the private prison industry for all of our social ills, it's time to move on to bottled water companies?
 
2014-03-11 05:49:55 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-03-11 05:55:33 PM  

Harvey Manfrenjensenjen: This is unacceptable. Why are we letting our drinking water become ill?

qorkfiend: Unfortunately, the response to this will be "We need to buy more bottled water" instead of "We need to improve the water system we already pay for".

Where is this sudden Fark fad coming from? You guys finally getting tired of blaming the private prison industry for all of our social ills, it's time to move on to bottled water companies?


No, they are not even remotely the cause of our woes, merely a symptom.
 
2014-03-11 05:57:44 PM  
Is it really drinking water if it's untreated?
 
2014-03-11 05:59:44 PM  

slayer199: Is it really drinking water if it's untreated?


Everyone with a residential well says, 'Ummm, yeah."
 
2014-03-11 06:01:10 PM  

HeadLever: slayer199: Is it really drinking water if it's untreated?

Everyone with a residential well says, 'Ummm, yeah."


Do water softeners count?
 
2014-03-11 06:01:24 PM  
This is why I only drink spirited drinks.
 
2014-03-11 06:04:08 PM  

HeadLever: Everyone with a residential well says, 'Ummm, yeah."


I'm not talking about water softeners, I'm talking about calling something drinking water.  If it's "safe to drink" it's drinking or potable water...otherwise it's just water.
 
2014-03-11 06:07:51 PM  

meat0918: Do water softeners count?


I don't have a water softener on my well.  Water softeners are not there to remove bacteria.  It is there to remove hardness.
 
2014-03-11 06:10:43 PM  
Wait, if it isn't fit for drinking, such as if it could make you ill, why would you call it drinking water? I wouldn't drink that shiat. Its just water then, like from the toilet. But then I grew up spoiled with water from my own well, and good filters. One good thing about the country.
 
2014-03-11 06:11:04 PM  

slayer199: I'm talking about calling something drinking water.  If it's "safe to drink" it's drinking or potable water...


Ground water is perfectly safe to drink in many parts of the country.  It is still the main way that rural homes get water in my neck of the woods.  Again water softeners are there to reduce the hardness, which has nothing to do with making water 'safe to drink'.
 
2014-03-11 06:14:33 PM  
This is why I only drink Dr Pepper. I may pass an average of two kidney stones a year, but I don't have to worry about mind-control serum OR Taco Bell-levels of explosive diarrhea. Plus, Dr Pepper is the best drink ever invented.
 
2014-03-11 06:15:34 PM  

Caffienatedjedi: Wait, if it isn't fit for drinking, such as if it could make you ill, why would you call it drinking water?


As with any water system, contamination from outside sources is the main culprit on these outbreaks.  As zaz alluded to, major rainstorms are a big issue washing things into the potable water supply. When you chlorinate your water, it can typically kill a reasonable amount of contaminates.  Unchlorinated or untreated water may still be safe for the most part, but it will not be able to handle contamination as well.

If you have a completely enclosed system like a rural house hooked up to a well, that is not a big issue.  When you have large systems or any open water, it becomes more and more likely.
 
2014-03-11 06:17:18 PM  

HeadLever: Ground water is perfectly safe to drink in many parts of the country. It is still the main way that rural homes get water in my neck of the woods. Again water softeners are there to reduce the hardness, which has nothing to do with making water 'safe to drink'.


Then it's "drinking water" is it not?  Water that's safe to drink is drinking water.  Water that isn't safe to drink is untreated water, not drinkable/potable.

The point I was making is the headline is contradictory by using the term "untreated drinking water" and adding (more or less) that it's not safe to drink.  It's either safe to drink (drinking water) or it's not and needs to be treated to be safe to drink.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drinking_water
 
2014-03-11 06:20:08 PM  

slayer199: Water that isn't safe to drink is untreated water, not drinkable/potable.


No, as you don't have to treat all water to make it potable.  Groundwater is generally perfectly fine without any treatment. For that type of water, you just pump from the well and drink.
 
2014-03-11 06:26:39 PM  

HeadLever: No, as you don't have to treat all water to make it potable. Groundwater is generally perfectly fine without any treatment. For that type of water, you just pump from the well and drink.


Ok, I probably phrased that wrong.

Water that is unsafe to drink is not potable and needs to be treated to make safe for drinking.  As you pointed out, some untreated water is potable.

Back to my point, it's not drinking water if it's unsafe to drink.
 
2014-03-11 06:49:14 PM  

slayer199: HeadLever: No, as you don't have to treat all water to make it potable. Groundwater is generally perfectly fine without any treatment. For that type of water, you just pump from the well and drink.

Ok, I probably phrased that wrong.

Water that is unsafe to drink is not potable and needs to be treated to make safe for drinking.  As you pointed out, some untreated water is potable.

Back to my point, it's not drinking water if it's unsafe to drink.


Every person who has ingested water has died. That doesn't seem very safe to me.
 
2014-03-11 06:52:28 PM  

Weatherkiss: Every person who has ingested water has died. That doesn't seem very safe to me.


Crap, another DHMO alarmist.

"Fatal when inhaled!" "Major component of acid rain!" "Can cause burns in gaseous form!"

Blah blah blah, ya hippie.
 
2014-03-11 06:56:21 PM  
I wonder how much money was spent to study what we already know.
 
2014-03-11 07:09:20 PM  

slayer199: Water that is unsafe to drink is not potable and needs to be treated to make safe for drinking.  As you pointed out, some untreated water is potable.


Ah, if that is you angle, then I agree.  Water that does not meet a certain criteria (generally the EPA sets those standards) will need to be treated.  Most of the time, you can get groundwater to meet those standards, while you generally need to treat surface water.
 
2014-03-11 07:22:16 PM  

HeadLever: meat0918: Do water softeners count?

I don't have a water softener on my well.  Water softeners are not there to remove bacteria.  It is there to remove hardness.


I'm feeling pedantic.

Treatment is too broad a term then.

Sanitized water would be better.

Do they still drop the disinfectant tablets or whatever down the well after drilling to clean up any introduced pathogens?
 
2014-03-11 07:23:31 PM  

meat0918: HeadLever: meat0918: Do water softeners count?

I don't have a water softener on my well.  Water softeners are not there to remove bacteria.  It is there to remove hardness.

I'm feeling pedantic.

Treatment is too broad a term then.

Sanitized potable water would be better.

Do they still drop the disinfectant tablets or whatever down the well after drilling to clean up any introduced pathogens?


FTF my pedantic ass.
 
2014-03-11 07:24:51 PM  
www.blogcdn.com
 
2014-03-11 09:27:19 PM  

HeadLever: Groundwater is generally perfectly fine without any treatment. For that type of water, you just pump from the well and drink.


http://www.epa.gov/region1/students/pdfs/gwc1.pdf
 
2014-03-11 10:18:04 PM  

HeadLever: Groundwater is generally perfectly fine without any treatment. For that type of water, you just pump from the well and drink.


http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/private/wells/disease/crypt os poridium.html
http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/private/wells/treatment.htm l

Dirt doesn't magically make pollutants & bad guys go away.

Even in 1814, mines were dumping their tailings into open pits exposed to rain runoff. In the 1850s, gold miners were dumping mercury waste into streams. Over 150 years later and you can get mercury poisoning from eating wild fish caught in some parts of California.
 
2014-03-11 10:41:37 PM  

meat0918: o they still drop the disinfectant tablets or whatever down the well after drilling to clean up any introduced pathogens?


It depends.  Groundwater that is out of the influence of surface water typically has no pathogens in it.  It is typically good to go.  Typically with groundwater, you need to be concerned about minerals more than bacteria. Here in Idaho, most of the groundwater is good to go.
 
2014-03-11 10:43:35 PM  

hardinparamedic: http://www.epa.gov/region1/students/pdfs/gwc1.pdfy


I think that you can agree that my point here is about groundwater that has not been contaminated by an outside source.  Of course that can be an issue.
 
2014-03-11 10:47:19 PM  

Shadi: Dirt doesn't magically make pollutants & bad guys go away.


True to a point.  Crypto and giardia are a problem in groundwater only when there is a surface water influence that sweeps these bacteria into the groundwater.  This is typically found in shallow wells or wells near a stream/lake.

You are correct that having groundwater is not a guarantee of its water being potable and even if it is shown to be good at the start, it needs to be tested periodically.
 
2014-03-11 10:49:41 PM  
At least 60 Wisconsin communities don't treat their water, and do no or minimal testing.
See
http://host.madison.com/news/local/health_med_fit/at-least-communiti es -in-state-don-t-treat-water-despite/article_7bb7a04c-6083-11e1-9020-00 1871e3ce6c.html
and
http://www.twincities.com/ci_20053696

"But in May, the Republican-controlled state Legislature rescinded the rule. State Rep. Eric Severson, R-Star Prairie, authored the amendment that removed the requirement and argued the DNR requirement was an unnecessary financial and bureaucratic burden on communities with already strong water standards."

Because, you know, treating water is Socialism. We need to punish people, not help them.
Water is mostly a mixer in Wisconsin anyway.
 
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